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Here & Now

Mondays through Thursdays 2:00 pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science, and politics.

Ways to Connect

President Trump proposed dramatic cuts in corporate and personal taxes Wednesday in an overhaul his administration asserts will spur national economic growth and bring jobs and prosperity to America’s middle class. But his ambitious plan is alarming lawmakers who worry it will balloon federal deficits.

NPR economics correspondent John Ydstie (@jey51) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to go over the details.

About 1 million Americans live in Mexico, and many of them do so illegally. But it’s much easier to navigate life in Mexico as an immigrant without proper documents than it is in the United States.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson explores this with two people who have firsthand experience with the differences.

Editor’s Note: Here & Now agreed not to use our guests’ last names for this conversation.

Interview Highlights

On Eddie’s immigration story and the limitations of his status

Grant Sabatier was a college graduate, living with his parents, too broke to buy a burrito, when he decided that he was going to make $1 million by age 30. He says the first thing he needed to do was change his mindset to one of saving — which he refers to as “paying yourself first.”

He’s now a successful blogger and digital strategist who offers six steps to wealth, which include side jobs, stock market investment, lifestyle changes and daily saving goals.

In a series of full-page newspaper advertisements in The New York Times, The Washington Post and The San Francisco Chronicle, Silicon Valley investor Doug Derwin published an open letter calling on Elon Musk to sever ties with the Trump administration.

Musk, CEO of SpaceX and Tesla, sits on the White House Strategic and Policy Forum and has responded to critics before, saying that to leave the board over political differences “would be wrong.”

When kids don’t brush their teeth, they risk more than just cavities. Experts say tooth decay can affect a child’s diet, their ability to concentrate and do well in school and their self-esteem.

Overall, children’s oral health is getting better. But poor kids aren’t improving as much. Take San Francisco’s Chinatown, a neighborhood with the highest rate of childhood tooth decay in the city.

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