WNPR

Here & Now

Mondays through Thursdays 2:00 pm
  • Hosted by Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science, and politics.

Ways to Connect

President Trump is almost through his first 100 days in office. That largely symbolic marker comes on Saturday. And while he’s hit some roadblocks when it comes to high-profile issues like immigration and health care, Trump has taken aggressive steps toward fulfilling campaign promises he made on energy and the environment.

Congress is nearing an agreement on a $1 trillion spending bill to keep the government running, now that President Trump has apparently backed off his threat to cancel subsidies for low-income people to buy health insurance.

Members of the House Freedom Caucus on Wednesday approved a more conservative version of the American Health Care Act, but the bill still needs support from more moderate Republicans if it’s going to replace the Affordable Care Act.

The oil giant BP opened a gas station in the outskirts of Mexico City in March.

On the surface it doesn’t sound like much. But it also happens to be the first global retail brand to operate a fueling station in Mexico since the country began loosening restrictive energy policies that date back to the 1930s.

Here & Now‘s Peter O’Dowd takes a closer look at where the new station fits in the Mexican government’s efforts to open the country’s energy market.

President Trump proposed dramatic cuts in corporate and personal taxes Wednesday in an overhaul his administration asserts will spur national economic growth and bring jobs and prosperity to America’s middle class. But his ambitious plan is alarming lawmakers who worry it will balloon federal deficits.

NPR economics correspondent John Ydstie (@jey51) joins Here & Now‘s Robin Young to go over the details.

About 1 million Americans live in Mexico, and many of them do so illegally. But it’s much easier to navigate life in Mexico as an immigrant without proper documents than it is in the United States.

Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson explores this with two people who have firsthand experience with the differences.

Editor’s Note: Here & Now agreed not to use our guests’ last names for this conversation.

Interview Highlights

On Eddie’s immigration story and the limitations of his status

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