Here and Now

Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson

Here & Now offers a distinctive mix of hard news and rich conversation featuring interesting players from across the spectrum of arts and culture, business, technology, science and politics.

Genre: 
Composer ID: 
51deea82d76c38de3200015a|5187c93ce1c8256467c3b610

Pages

NPR Story
2:48 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Tom Perrotta Brings 'The Leftovers' To HBO

The HBO series, "The Leftovers," explores what happens on Earth for those left behind after the Rapture. It is based on Tom Perrotta's novel of the same name. Perrotta was also a producer and writer on the show. (HBO)

Originally published on Mon June 30, 2014 10:36 am

Think for a second. Say there is a rapture — a Bibilical event in which people around you

disappear.

What would you do? Wouldn’t you wonder a little, “Well, why not me?”

In Tom Perrotta‘s novel “The Leftovers,” there are hellish questions on Earth after millions are whisked off to heaven.

And now, “The Leftovers” is an HBO series. Perrotta isn’t new to having his work adapted to the screen. Previously, Perrotta’s novels “Election” and “Little Children” were adapted into Academy Award nominated films.

Read more
NPR Story
2:48 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

A Retired Satellite Gets Back To Work

This 1976 photo shows the International Sun-Earth Explorer C (ISEE-3, ICE) undergoing testing in the Goddard Space Flight Center's dynamic test chamber. (Wikimedia Commons)

After 31 years in space, ISEE-3 is finally coming home.

The International Sun-Earth Explorer 3 was a humble satellite launched in the late 1970s to monitor solar winds – until Robert Farquhar commandeered and reprogrammed it to help the United States become the first country to encounter a comet.

Now, a team of scientists have come together in an unofficial effort to awaken the sleeping spacecraft and return it to its original spot — and function — by combining old technology with new.

Read more
NPR Story
2:48 pm
Fri June 27, 2014

Ukraine Seals Economic Trade Deal With EU

In this handout photo provided by the German Government Press Office (BPA), French President Francois Hollande, Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko, and German Chancellor Angela Merkel chat at the EU summit after the signing of the EU's Association Agreement with Ukraine on June 27 in Brussels, Belgium. The landmark agreement will mean that the Ukraine will need to adhere to European values such as democracy and human rights. (Guido Bergmann/Bundesregierung via Getty Images)

Ukraine’s new president, Petro Poroshenko, has signed a historic trade and economic agreement with the European Union. This comes just seven months after former leader Viktor Yanukovych rejected a trade deal with the EU, sparking protests that toppled his government.

Read more
NPR Story
3:29 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

U.S. Advances In World Cup, Despite Loss To Germany

Germany has beaten the United States at the World Cup, but the U.S. team is still advancing.

Thomas Mueller scored his fourth goal of the tournament to lead Germany to the 1-0 win. Still, the U.S. moves on to the knockout stage despite the loss, as Portugal beat Ghana, 2-1.

Both teams knew before kickoff that a draw would see them through, but neither held back.

NPR’s Russell Lewis watched the game at Arena Pernambuco in Recife, Brazil, and joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson with details.

Read more
NPR Story
2:23 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Summer Seafood Recipes From Chef Kathy Gunst

Kathy Gunst's "Roast Summer Clams with Chorizo, Tomatoes and Basil." See recipe below. (Kathy Gunst/Here & Now)

It’s officially summer. For many people, including Here & Now’s resident chef Kathy Gunst, that means fish. And not just any fish — summer fish, including lobsters, clams and summer flounder.

As she tells host Jeremy Hobson, she’s also always thinking about sustainable fish — “seafood caught or farmed in ways that ensure a supply of seafood long into the future.” (More info on making sustainable seafood choices here.)

Read more
NPR Story
2:23 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

U.S. Advances To World Cup's 2nd Round Despite Loss

Clint Dempsey of the United States acknowledges the fans after being defeated by Germany 1-0 during the 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil group G match between the United States and Germany at Arena Pernambuco on June 26, 2014 in Recife, Brazil. (Michael Steele/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 2:22 pm

The United States reached the knockout stage of consecutive World Cups for the first time, just not the way the Americans wanted.

Germany beat the U.S. 1-0 Thursday in soggy Recife on Thomas Mueller’s 55th-minute goal to win Group G, but the Americans held onto second place when Portugal defeated Ghana 2-1 in a game played simultaneously in Brasilia.

Read more
NPR Story
2:01 pm
Thu June 26, 2014

Rosanne Cash Speaks Out On Music Licensing

Roseanne Cash, pictured here in January 2014 at a WFUV event in New York City, testified before the House Judiciary Committee yesterday about music licensing and illegal downloading. (Gus Philippas/WFUV)

Originally published on Thu June 26, 2014 3:49 pm

Rosanne Cash, musician and daughter of country music legend Johnny Cash, is urging Congress to do more to protect intellectual property rights in the digital age.

She testified before a House Judiciary subcommittee yesterday in support of the Respect Act, which would compensate artists for digital performances of songs recorded before 1972. Right now, there is no federal copyright protection for those recordings.

Read more
NPR Story
2:39 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Reinstated Methodist Pastor: 'I Will Never Be Silent Again On LGBTQ Issues'

Reverend Frank Schaefer says his reinstatement by the Methodist Church “brings a lot of hope” to the LGBTQ community in the Methodist Church.

Reverend Schaefer was defrocked last November for officiating his son’s same-sex wedding, after saying that he would not let Church doctrine stop him from officiating same-sex weddings in the future, if asked.

He has now been fully re-instated and assigned to a new congregation, but the decision has deepened the divide over same-sex and gender issues in the Methodist Church.

Read more
NPR Story
2:21 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

Neil Gaiman Brings A Multimedia Extravaganza To Carnegie Hall

Neil Gaiman's latest book is "The Truth is a Cave in the Black Mountains." He's pictured here on March 9, 2013. (Tim Mosenfelder/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 2:19 pm

Neil Gaiman has won a wide following with novels like “American Gods,” “The Ocean at the End of the Lane” and “Coraline,” and he’s read his works aloud numerous times.

Read more
NPR Story
2:21 pm
Wed June 25, 2014

U.S. Economic Activity Down Sharply In First Quarter

The U.S. economy has shrank at an annual rate of 2.9 percent in the first quarter of this year, according to the Commerce Department. This is the fastest rate of decline since the recession ended five years ago.

Joe Weisenthal of the Business Insider joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the forces behind the decline and what we can expect for the future.

Read more
NPR Story
3:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

An Evening With John Waters On Hitchhiking And Middle America

Film director John Waters has penned a book called "Carsick," about his cross-country hitchhiking trip. (Jason Kempin/Getty Images for EJAF)

John Waters has never been afraid of taking risks. His films have depicted everything from convicted criminals to coprophagia, and he’s often been in the news for his controversial opinions.

Read more
NPR Story
3:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Where Are We On The Housing Market?

A "sale pending" sign is pictured on a house. (Dan Moyle/Flickr)

The Commerce Department is reporting that new home sales soared in May to their highest level since the financial market crisis six years ago. That follows a report yesterday that sales of existing homes also rose sharply last month.

But even with the gains, sales of both new and existing homes are running well below what economists consider healthy. So where are we on the housing market?

Chris Low, chief economist at FTN Financial joins Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson to discuss the housing market.

Read more
NPR Story
3:58 pm
Tue June 24, 2014

Wimbledon Watch: New Faces As Women's Tennis Makes A Comeback

Sloane Stephens of the United States in action during her Ladies' Singles first round match against Maria Kirilenko of Russia on day one of the Wimbledon Lawn Tennis Championships at the All England Lawn Tennis and Croquet Club at Wimbledon on June 23, 2014 in London, England. (Steve Bardens/Getty Images)

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 4:42 pm

Sports correspondent Tom Perrotta, writes that “women’s tennis has finally found its future.” And it’s beyond the hands of Maria Sharapova, or Serena and Venus Williams.

American Sloane Stevens, 21, lost on day one of Wimbledon yesterday, but 18-year-old Taylor Townsend plays today. They’re both up-and-coming players to watch, along with 20-year-old Canadian Eugenie Bouchard, who also plays today.

Read more
NPR Story
2:59 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

The Ghostly Sound Of The Theremin

Jon Bernhardt playing the theremin in the WBUR studios. (Jesse Costa/WBUR)

Even if you’re not familiar with the musical instrument called the theremin, chances are you’ve heard its ghostly sound. The theremin is unique because of how it’s played: you make music without touching it. Theremin player Jon Bernhardt discusses the instrument and plays some music for Here & Now’s Sacha Pfeiffer.

Read more
Soccer
2:59 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Win, Lose or Draw, U.S. Can Still Advance In World Cup

U.S. forward Clint Dempsey scores during a Group G football match between USA and Portugal at the Amazonia Arena in Manaus during the 2014 FIFA World Cup on June 22, 2014. (Odd Andersen/AFP/Getty Images)

There were 30 seconds left to play and the United States team was beating Portugal 2 to 1. The majority pro-American crowd of more than 40,000 at last night’s World Cup game in Brazil were ready to party, but it wasn’t to be.

Portugal scored with less than half a minute to go, and now the U.S. looks ahead to Thursday evening’s game against Germany to determine its World Cup future.

Read more
NPR Story
2:59 pm
Mon June 23, 2014

Louisville Mayor 'Not Opposed' To Minimum Wage Increase

Mayor Greg Fischer of Louisville, Kentucky says he "would support" a gradual increase in the minimum wage, but doing so "has not been a big topic of conversation in our city." (www.louisvilleky.gov)

The U.S. Conference of Mayors is wrapping up its annual meeting in Dallas, Texas. The annual conference covers urban policies ranging including climate change, education, same-sex marriage, inequality and economic growth.

Raising the minimum wage was much discussed, because Seattle recently raised its minimum wage to $15 an hour.

Read more
NPR Story
4:43 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

More Analysis Of Obama's Remarks On Iraq

President Obama laid out his plan to help Iraq today, including sending up to 300 military advisers to the country to train local military, and sending Secretary of State John Kerry to the region. But the president said several times that there would be no more U.S. combat troops in Iraq.

Here & Now’s Robin Young and Jeremy Hobson speak with Rick Klein, political director for ABC News, and Robert Scales, retired U.S. Army major general and former commandant of the U.S. Army War College.

Read more
NPR Story
4:43 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

Pro-Government Supporters Struggle After Thailand Coup

More than 100,000 Cambodians have fled Thailand in recent days. They’re apparently leaving because they fear Thailand’s new military rulers are about to crack down on migrant workers in Thailand. Many of those workers are Cambodians.

The new military rulers deny they are about to crackdown on those workers, but there’s no denying they are suppressing any resistance to their rule. This is part of the fallout from last month’s coup, which ousted the former government of Yingluck Shinawatra.

Read more
NPR Story
4:43 pm
Thu June 19, 2014

Where Oil Workers Go, The 'Sticker Bus' Follows

The Sticker Bus is a traveling sticker store that markets mainly to oilfield workers. (Mónica Ortiz Uribe)

Americans are expected to his the road in droves this summer, maybe heading to national parks or the beach. That includes Josie Goeres, who spends a lot of time on the road. She’s in New Mexico now, chasing after her customers for her very unusual day job. From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Monica Ortiz Uribe of Fronteras Desk reports.

Read more
NPR Story
3:59 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

Dick Cheney's Op-Ed And The Return Of The Neocon

Former U.S. Vice President Dick Cheney listens as his wife Lynne Cheney speaks about her book "James Madison: A Life Reconsidered" May 12, 2014 in Washington, DC. ( Win McNamee/Getty Images)

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 9:56 pm

Architects and proponents of the Iraq War are now back with criticism of President Obama’s foreign policy.

Leading the group is former Vice President Dick Cheney, who co-wrote an op-ed with his daughter Liz Cheney in today’s Wall Street Journal. The subtitle reads, “Rarely has a U.S. President been so wrong about so much at the expense of so many.”

Gideon Rose, editor of Foreign Affairs magazine, discusses what neoconservatives are saying about President Obama and Iraq with Here & Now’s Robin Young.

Read more
NPR Story
3:07 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

In 'The Rover,' Guy Pearce Takes A Bleak Road Trip

Guy Pearce is pictured in a still from “The Rover.” (A24)

The new film “The Rover” is set in Australia, 10 years after the country has collapsed and degenerated into barbarism.

English-born Australian actor Guy Pearce plays a drifter whose car is stolen and who’s determined to get it back, no matter what the cost.

Read more
NPR Story
3:07 pm
Wed June 18, 2014

American Airlines To End Most Flights To Venezuela

A man walks next to an American Airlines ticket sale office in Caracas on June 17, 2014. American Airlines announced earlier today that it will cut almost 80 percent of its weekly flights to Venezuela, on account of a USD 750 million debt that the Venezuelan government holds with them. The government of President Nicolas Maduro owes several international airlines USD 4,200 million, which made two of them close down their operations in Venezuela and others to implement deep cutbacks. (LEO RAMIREZ/AFP/Getty Images)

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 8:23 am

American Airlines is cutting nearly 80 percent of its flights between the U.S. and Venezuela starting in July, because the Venezuelan government owes it $750 million dollars in ticket revenue.

American is the largest foreign airline serving Venezuela, and it’s just the latest carrier to suspend most or all flights to the country.

The carrier is also scrapping all direct flights to Venezuela from New York, Dallas and San Juan, Puerto Rico, and will only fly there from Miami.

Read more
NPR Story
2:58 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Are Room Service And Hotel Mini Bars Becoming Obsolete?

Mini bar included at The Standard Hotel in Los Angeles. (adamjackson1984/Flickr)

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 12:02 pm

The New York Hilton has modified its traditional room service model and has moved to a delivery system after the company has seen less and less room service orders at the hotel.

Hilton has not implemented this across the all of its hotels, as it says different markets have different demands.

But what about mini bars? Are the goodies in hotel room mini fridges as popular as they once were, and are they a profitable business model?

Read more
Emergency Care
2:58 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Some Paramedics Doing Less Transport, More Treatment At Scene

Speeding to a house call? Training paramedics to do more treatment at the scene can be pricey, critics say.
iStockphoto

Originally published on Thu June 19, 2014 7:42 am

It's being called the house call of the future: Ambulance crews rush when you call 911, but instead of taking you to the emergency room, they treat you at home.

Read more
NPR Story
2:58 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Startup Aims To Score With World Cup

Boston startup Dashbell is capitalizing on the crowds gathering in Brazil. (Nelson Antoine/AP)

The World Cup finals kicked off yesterday in Brazil. For the roughly 70,000 Brazilian immigrants in Massachusetts, the opening match between the host nation and Croatia was a reason to leave work early.

But one Boston startup is looking to the World Cup for more work.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, Curt Nickisch of WBUR has the story of a small company using the global competition to prove its worth on a bigger stage.

Read more
NPR Story
2:58 pm
Tue June 17, 2014

Ariz. Mayor Worries About New Wave Of Child Migrants

A child on the Mexican side of the U.S.-Mexico border fence looks into Arizona during a special 'Mass on the Border' on April 1, 2014 in Nogales, Arizona. (John Moore/Getty Images)

Vice President Joe Biden heads to Guatemala this week to meet with leaders of Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador about the wave of unaccompanied children coming across the U.S. Mexico border from those Central American countries.

Border patrol agents are finding children as young as 4, with notes pinned on their clothing with instructions on how to contact relatives in the U.S.

Read more
NPR Story
2:27 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

The Rowing Team That Stunned Hitler And The World

In 1936, an American rowing team from the University of Washington stunned first the elite American rowing squads by qualifying for the Berlin Olympics, and then the rest of the world by winning the gold medal in front of a crowd that included Adolf Hitler and Joseph Goebbels.

Read more
NPR Story
2:27 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Building Tiny Human Organs With 3-D Printing

Dr. Sangeeta Bhatia with students in the lab at MIT. (MIT)

Originally published on Sat June 21, 2014 8:12 am

Dr. Sangeeta Bhatia has big ideas about her work with tiny organs. Using 3-D printing and human cells, she’s created a miniature human livers in her lab at MIT that can be used for testing drugs.

Dr. Bhatia is part of a bio-engineering revolution that is transforming the field of medicine. She tells Here & Now’s host Jeremy Hobson that her goal is to scale up the size of the micro-liver so it can be used as an alternative to human-to-human liver transplants.

Read more
NPR Story
2:27 pm
Mon June 16, 2014

Amazon To Jump Into Smartphone Business

The giant online retailer Amazon is expanding its horizons and introducing a smartphone that could top all others on the market.

Amazon is set to introduce a smartphone with 3-D features this Wednesday at a media event in Seattle. Ina Fried, a senior editor at Re/Code, tells Here & Now’s Jeremy Hobson how Amazon may stand out from the crowded pack.

Read more
NPR Story
2:56 pm
Fri June 13, 2014

In Connecticut, The Charles W. Morgan Sails Again

After months of preparation, the oldest wooden whaling ship in the world, the Charles W. Morgan, began her 38th voyage as she is towed down the Mystic River on her way to New London. (Brad Clift/WNPR)

The only wooden whaling ship in the world, the Charles W. Morgan, has just emerged from a painstaking five-year restoration, and is about to depart on its 38th voyage into the waters of the Atlantic.

But instead of hunting whales, today, the Morgan is all about saving them.

From the Here & Now Contributors Network, WNPR’S J Holt has the story.

Read more

Pages