The Faith Middleton Show

Mondays through Thursdays at 3:00 and 9:00 pm. Saturdays at 12:00 pm.

For 35 years, the two-time Peabody Award-winning Faith Middleton Show has been widely recognized for fostering insightful, thought-provoking conversation. Faith offers her listeners some of the world's most fascinating people and subjects. The show, which is produced by Lori Mack and Jonathan McNicol, has been inducted into the Connecticut Magazine Hall of Fame as “Best Local Talk Show.”

The Faith Middleton Show airs Mondays through Thursdays at 3:00 and 9:00 pm. Wednesdays feature The Food Schmooze®, which also airs Saturdays at 12:00 pm. 

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We have easy recipes for Thanksgiving side dishes, including roasted lemon broccoli and twice baked crispy pecan sweet potatoes. Plus, don't miss the video of Faith using the Aw Shucks!™  oyster opening device.

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As elections are held across the U.S., raising the volume on what needs fixing in America, many Americans choose to work on helping citizens in other countries. Whether paid, or unpaid, we wonder what inspires work that says we are living now in a global village.

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When she's our guest, we encourage you to do more than read. Push the play button and hear the outstanding travel tips we get from Amy Farley, who does The Trip Doctor pages in Travel + Leisure magazine. Some of the topics we covered with her: 

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We love ideas, innovation, invention. On ICE we ask you to brainstorm with us about ideas, and we talk to innovative types about what's they're doing. On this edition of The Faith Middleton Show's On ICE, Dr. Eileen Cooper, a Fullbright Scholar, has written Holographic Mind, a book about training the brain to think in four dimensions.

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The 25th Anniversary Trees of Hope Fundraising Spectacular will be aglow with gorgeously decorated Christmas trees at the New Haven Maritime Building. The festive event, chaired by WNPR's Faith Middleton, benefits the Ronald McDonald House of Connecticut.

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Seriously? You can actually roast an entire turkey ahead of time and serve it hot at the table? Yes, says Ina, and she now does it often, including on Thanksgiving. Here's the thing… it's not only Ina's taste in flavor combinations and technique that always win us over—it's her knockout ideas. And they are as dazzling as ever in her new book, Make It Ahead. There's the do-ahead turkey and gravy, sides, and desserts—we'll get to those, but also ways to whip cream ahead, freeze things and pull them out, even make your own healthy peanut butter dog biscuits. (She says she's been trying to get her publishers to print that one for ages; this time she insisted.) 

Scenes. Conversation. Politics. What inspires artists working in their studios?

Inspiration can come from the quiet of the mind, or, as we just noticed, the spark that results in art can be set off because of world events. Connecticut artist Lula Mae Blocton explains how her work on paper was inspired by events in Newtown, Connecticut.

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Paul Bogard, the author of the paperback, The End of Night, went on a journey in search of something rare in America and Europe—true darkness. He wanted to have the jaw-dropping experience of looking up at the night sky to see uncountable stars and planets that we seldom see due to light pollution.

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Faith's motto on The Book Show is: Life is short, but it can be ever so wide.

Join Faith and her book buddies for a call-in show recommending terrific books to read in all categories. If you're in a book club, please tell us what you've read and enjoyed.

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Our Thanksgiving ideas begin with prosciutto wrapped roasted turkey and a terrific wine for around $20. Chris Prosperi made the most amazing Barolo wine beef short ribs—seriously delicious. Faith gives a recipe for acorn squash with toasted almonds, blood orange juice, olive oil, and a touch of maple syrup. And Alex Province tells us how to make The Black Cat cocktail, just in time for Halloween. 

Survivors do it. Children do it. Retirees do it, too—begin again despite what came before.

Look around and you will see people returning to college in later life to earn a degree. You'll find individuals choosing love after the shock of a lying spouse. And then there are the lives of children.

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Barking, fleas, Lyme disease, pet food, biting, housebreaking, shyness, pet insurance, animal rescue. Top flight advice from vet Dr. Todd Friedland. Don't miss his adventures with animals of all kinds.

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No surgery. No medication. No drastic measures. Just healthy jointsfor life!

In Healthy Joints for Life, leading orthopedic surgeon and former NFL player Richard Diana, M.D., applies his unique experience and training to tackle joint pain. Based on cutting-edge research that has clarified the crucial role of a molecule known as NFkB in regulating inflammation, Dr. Diana's proven eight-week program teaches you to harness the power of this research to reduce inflammation, relieve pain, and rejuvenate your joints.

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Cider-baked pork with red cabbage and apples… baked risotto with butternut squash, sage, and parmigiano… Provençal beef with olives, tomatoes, and oranges… Sunday Casseroles is among the best one-pot meal collections we've ever tried. In fact, we're going to make the lobster corn casserole for New Year's Eve. Betty Rosbottom knows how to elevate far beyond the ordinary. We just finished dining on her Venetian chicken. Mouth watering, and it's all prepared in advance of your company.

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Repair and boost the bacteria in the gut with the right food, prebiotics and probiotics, and you'll feel better and lose weight. That's the theory of Dr. Raphael Kellman of New York, author of The Microbiome Diet.

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Good Morning Paleo is a cookbook that features breakfasts the paleo way. Plus, they're gluten-free and grain-free… breakfast burritos, Portobello bacon mushroom scramble… how about lime salmon cakes with paleo sour cream?

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Repair and boost the bacteria in the gut with the right food, prebiotics and probiotics, and you'll feel better and lose weight. That's the theory of Dr. Raphael Kellman of New York, author of The Microbiome Diet.

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That was our test—could anyone tell Robert Landolphi's recipes were gluten free? None of us could, nor could anyone else who tried them. All we know is that they're delicious, and well they should be. Landolphi, head of culinary operations at UConn, says he spent 14 years perfecting these recipes after his wife was diagnosed with celiac disease.

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The paleo diet emphasizes the basics: meat, seafood, fruit, vegetables, and nuts. It's based on the foods our paleolithic ancestors ate. The diet has also been touted as the solution for food allergy relief and better health. But healthy eating shouldn't mean you have to give up flavor. 

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Real, great-tasting food. Nutritious. Quick cooking for busy people, families and new cooks. That's what we love about Dinner: The Playbook by Jenny Rosenstrach. When we told her we were entranced by her chicken parm meatballs she burst out with, "That's the single most popular thing I've ever done." But that's not the only delicious eye candy in her book, and I do mean candy. 

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Fist fights and guns in Congress… robber barons roaming the land… bombs exploding in the streets… a boisterous, snaggle-toothed press corps… this was how it was in America a decade into the 1900s, when close pals Theodore Roosevelt and William Howard Taft broke up their friendship. Happens all the time, you might say, but in this case the break-up so crippled the progressive wing of the Republican Party that Democrat Woodrow Wilson was elected president, changing the course of history.

Popular, Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Doris Kearns Goodwin tells me how the muckraking media zeroed in on corruption high and low, causing Roosevelt to enact reforms instead of handling the rich, famous and powerful with kid gloves. These are lessons for today, she says.

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On the menu… real polenta in under 15 minutes, no lie! Mouth-watering acorn squash… Alex Province's early autumn bourbon cocktail… a fantastic crisp rosé from California in our $15-and-under discovery category… and wowza spaghetti carbonara from The Farmstead Egg Guide & Cookbook.

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Whether it's you or someone you know, why can't we be prepared to take certain actions if we're diagnosed with cancer? We prepare for retirement, for funerals, for wills—isn't it wise to have as much information as possible for ourselves and people we care about, should we face the challenge?

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What makes an educated person? Is it the desire to learn? The ability to be a critical thinker in any situation? Perhaps.

For me, an educated person has the capacity to be a critical thinker—and an optimist at the same time. An educated person has developed a curious mind, thinks critically, has empathy, and an optimistic view.

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Your kitchen cabinet glows and you simply open its doors and begin talking (on Skype) with a friend or relative you can see. (Think what this means for children and grandparents, no matter they live.)

This is the idea of David Rose, an inventor and instructor at the legendary MIT Media Lab in Cambridge, Massachusetts. His new book, Enchanted Objects, is a fascinating read, because it explains how technology, human desire, design, and purpose meet up to improve our lives.

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On this week's fresh edition of The Food Schmooze: good gluten-free dishes… taco ideas… and delicious acorn squash… 

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This is the season of events, fairs, festivals, theater, museum shows, art happenings, music performances, and more. We open the phones for your tips, and we have some too.

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Paul Bogard, the author of the paperback, The End of Night, went on a journey in search of something rare in America and Europe—true darkness. He wanted to have the jaw-dropping experience of looking up at the night sky to see uncountable stars and planets that we seldom see due to light pollution.

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If you need a pick me up, join us for stories about strangers who were unexpectedly kind or generous. Call us if you were inspired to "pay it forward," or surprised to be the recipient of someone's generosity: 203-776-9677.

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Celebrate the end of summer with one of your last meals from the grill. This one's fresh and memorable, so savor every bite. I came up with what I call BLT Chicken by making a salad and adding flavors I love together—chicken, fresh corn, tomatoes and, I thought, why not—let's butter and grill the cornbread. Grilled cornbread has a crispy edge that makes me buckle in the knees, caramelized and buttery on the tongue.  

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