The Faith Middleton Show

On this page you will find an archive of Faith Middleton's previous programs.

As of November 5, 2015, The Faith Middleton Show became the Faith Middleton Food Schmooze®, allowing Faith to focus all her award-winning talents on her culinary passions. Faith is expanding her online presence with extensive food blogging, podcasts of her weekly show, and a more robust website at foodschmooze.org with tons of recipes, food tips, and new video demonstrations.

For radio programs after November 5, 2015 - please visit FoodSchmooze.org.

On this final edition of my daily show, now in its 36th year on WNPR, I start a new chapter as full-time host and executive producer of the expanded Faith Middleton Food Schmooze® Party. Who doesn't need a little more party?

Luisa Contreras/flickr creative commons

Guittard Chocolate Cookbook gives us a piece of heaven with its recipe for chocolate mousse pie featuring a chocolate cookie crust. We think it's a winner for Thanksgiving or anytime. Please check out our 2015 Best Ever Thanksgiving Recipe Kit… and hot tips to help you beat Thanksgiving stress—honestly, they really will…

Tyler Merbler/flickr creative commons

Sex, drugs, and rock & roll -- now there's a phrase that conjures up images and memories of the 1960s. But of course it wasn't all peace and love. The counterculture was completely intertwined with the serious challenges and changes that swept America in that decade, from civil rights and women's rights to the trauma of Vietnam and the anti-war movement. The violence, turmoil, and clashes between the generations paved the way for a surge in self-expression and creativity. We saw it through protests on college campuses, we watched it in the marches, and -- maybe most of all -- we heard it in the music that would become the common thread that wove it all together.

Quinn Dombrowski/flickr creative commons

Empathy, the ability to put yourself in someone else’s shoes to get a better understanding of what they're feeling or thinking, is a key ingredient to successful relationships. But studies show that being empathetic doesn't just improve relationships -- it reduces prejudice and racism, decreases bullying, encourages us to help others, and promotes tolerance and emotional well-being.

Alex Baker Photography

Many churches around the country are struggling with declining attendance, prompting some interesting questions and conversations. Is it the message? A sign of the times? The church’s mission? Maybe it’s past controversies. 

Glory Foods/flickr creative commons

Thanksgiving is on the way and our Food Schmooze® Recipe Kit is ready, including Barbara Kafka's Incredible Melting Potatoes… Chris Prosperi's Easy Make-Ahead Turkey and Gravy… Ina Garten's Twice-Baked Sweet Potatoes stuffed with glorious things… and mouth-watering Crispy Brussels Sprouts, Pears, Shallots, and Prosciutto, so easy a child could make them! Plus a bargain red wine, a steal at $16, and it goes with everything on your Thanksgiving table… and a delicious Pear-Basil Sour cocktail to ease you into the big day…

Potato Chips!

Oct 20, 2015
Gloria Cabada-Leman / flickr creative commons

If you like the fun, flavor, the passion of good food and conversation, party with us on this bonus edition of The Food Schmooze®. It is a call-in on that crispy, heaven-sent wafer, the potato chip.

Phalinn Ooi/flickr creative commons

Navigating our healthcare system is frustrating and time-consuming enough when you're healthy. But what if you get a serious diagnosis? You'll probably have to deal with multiple doctors' offices and their front-desk staffs, a hospital or clinic that may not be familiar, and a sudden deluge of paperwork, phone calls, and appointments. The chances for confusion and miscommunication multiply all along the chain -- and this can lead to problems ranging from annoying clerical mistakes to serious medical errors.

Phil Roeder/flickr creative commons

No surgery. No medication. No drastic measures. Just healthy jointsfor life!

In Healthy Joints for Life, leading orthopedic surgeon and former NFL player Richard Diana, M.D., applies his unique experience and training to tackle joint pain. Based on cutting-edge research that has clarified the crucial role of a molecule known as NFkB in regulating inflammation, Dr. Diana's proven eight-week program teaches you to harness the power of this research to reduce inflammation, relieve pain, and rejuvenate your joints.

Photographs copyright © 2015 by Victoria Pearson

These sensational pancakes are to-die-for… crispy edges, golden brown, and light as air... and the genius part is that you whip them up in a blender. We like them for breakfast, lunch, brunch, or dinner. They're that good. Even our pancake-hater said these are delicious. This recipe and others appear in the new book Citrus, featuring lemons, limes, oranges, grapefruit, and clementines.

jessicahtam / flickr creative commons

In its new handbook for happiness, the Mayo Clinic says new research shows that about 50 percent of our happiness rests on the deliberate decisions we make day after day. Yet we all know in this busy, demanding world, it can be difficult to step back and act with intention. The author of The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness, Dr. Amit Sood, hopes to give you skills that become habits, increasing your happiness quotient.

Natalie Maynor / flickr creative commons

Thai basil chicken… joyful chocolate almond bars… no-bake cake… sweet potato and ground turkey shepherd's pie… it's all in the new book The Science of Skinny Cookbook, produced by the scientist Dee McCaffrey, who eliminated synthetic chemicals from her diet and went from obese to slender. Now she offers the recipes that have made her plan a success…

woodleywonderworks/flickr creative commons

Dr. Mel Pohl, a medical specialist who works with chronic pain sufferers, says pain is REAL. That's his key point, and that there are ways to reclaim your life by avoiding addiction to opioids that often INCREASE pain without patients being aware of it. 

Bob Bob / flickr creative commons

In its new handbook for happiness, the Mayo Clinic says new research shows that about 50 percent of our happiness rests on the deliberate decisions we make day after day. Yet we all know in this busy, demanding world, it can be difficult to step back and act with intention. The author of The Mayo Clinic Handbook for Happiness, Dr. Amit Sood, hopes to give you skills that become habits, increasing your happiness quotient.

Dinner Solved!

Oct 6, 2015
Matthew Robinson/flickr creative commons

Food Schmooze® party guest Katie Workman, author of Dinner Solved!, tells us how to make quick lemony parmesan artichoke dip… prosciutto-wrapped shrimp with smoked paprika… mustard-maple glazed pork loin… spanish lemon-garlic pork chops… chicken in orange-honey soy sauce… and caesar roasted salmon… 

thebittenword.com/flickr creative commons

Repair and boost the bacteria in the gut with the right food, prebiotics and probiotics, and you'll feel better and lose weight. That's the theory of Dr. Raphael Kellman of New York, author of The Microbiome Diet.

Natalie Maynor / flickr creative commons

Thai basil chicken… joyful chocolate almond bars… no-bake cake… sweet potato and ground turkey shepherd's pie… it's all in the new book The Science of Skinny Cookbook, produced by the scientist Dee McCaffrey, who eliminated synthetic chemicals from her diet and went from obese to slender. Now she offers the recipes that have made her plan a success…

courtesy of Joanna Poitier

Sue Mengers was a Hollywood legend. She broke the conventional mold for women in show business and became one of the most powerful talent agents in Hollywood during the 1970s. Her client list read like a Who’s Who of the most sought-after actors in the business: Barbra Streisand, Gene Hackman, Ryan O’Neal, Diana Ross, Michael Caine, Candice Bergen, and the list goes on. Like many ambitious young women in the ‘50s, Mengers started out as a secretary for a talent agent and then climbed the ladder, a ladder that she made herself, into the top echelon of agents and talent representatives in the country. 

Tom Hopkins

His new book is just out, Jacques Pépin Heart & Soul in the Kitchen… his salmon tostadas are the fastest appetizer around… and don't miss his baked potatoes escargot—stuffed with snails, scallops or shrimp, and a drizzle of buttery garlic sauce…

University of Liverpool Faculty of Health & Life Sciences / flickr creative commons

Yale professor Paul Anastas says it isn't enough to know that environmental chemicals are making us fat and sick. Anastas directs a department that is working on redesigning chemicals in our food and many products we rely on so that they do not threaten our health.

Patrick McGarvey/flickr creative commons

Think about what it's like to ride that super-fast, double-looped, mountain-high roller coaster. Hyper-focused, you study the rickety bones of the structure while waiting your turn. You hear the clattering of the cars as they climb to the highest peak, and then watch as they plunge toward the ground with their loads of screaming passengers. Eventually the cars glide back to the starting position and it’s your turn. 

The '60s, Through the Notebook of a Rock Critic

Sep 24, 2015
Danny Birchall/flickr creative commons

Sex, drugs, and rock & roll -- now there's a phrase that conjures up images and memories of the 1960s. But of course it wasn't all peace and love. The counterculture was completely intertwined with the serious challenges and changes that swept America in that decade, from civil rights and women's rights to the trauma of Vietnam and the anti-war movement. The violence, turmoil, and clashes between the generations paved the way for a surge in self-expression and creativity. We saw it through protests on college campuses, we watched it in the marches, and -- maybe most of all -- we heard it in the music that would become the common thread that wove it all together.

John Herschell/flickr creative commons

Jacques Pépin's apple galette using store-bought pizza dough… the cinnamon toast cocktail from Anthony DeSerio… oven-roasted cranberry compote from Fine Cooking… Ina's parsnip and pear gratin… the easy, dry-brined turkey with extra-crispy skin… and, don't throw away that turkey carcass -- it's really tasty...

William Warby / flickr creative commons

A man named Billy Williams became a legend during World War II, but not only for his heroic actions; Williams, stationed in Burma, became an elephant "whisperer." The book Elephant Company describes the man's exceptional ability to understand the elephants around him, and the stunning ability of the elephants to understand and communicate with him, in return.

GollyGforce/flickr creative commons

There’s no doubt, being a parent is challenging. Some of those challenges have always existed, some are new to the 21st century. We worry about the health of our children. And if we’re lucky enough to have healthy children, we worry about their successes in life. Today, the pressure on parents and children to succeed has escalated dramatically. 

Andrew Filer/flickr creative commons

Katha Pollitt, is best known for her column in The Nation, where her work has appeared since 1980. She's a feminist, a keen observer of American culture, and the author of two books of poetry and four essay collections. One of those essays, “Learning to Drive,” appeared in The New Yorker 13 years ago, and has recently been adapted into a film starring Patricia Clarkson and Sir Ben Kingsley. 

We dive into hot topics about wine tasting behavior and the prediction that restaurants will stop using humans up front in favor of full automation… it's close to ready — the new modernist Mohegan Sun “molecular gastronomy” bar and restaurant, Sticks and Stones… the best cheap chef’s knife… an aged rum old fashioned named “Peg Leg” by Anthony DeSerio… how to create a meal using restaurant leftovers by Alex Province… and the new hit, HooDoo Brown Barbeque in Ridgefield, Conn.

Kalle Gustafsson/flickr creative commons

This hour, Faith and long-time contributor Bruce Clements discuss how we think and feel about physical touch.

Ben Stanfield/flickr creative commons

The ability to perform under pressure is one of the differences between good athletes and extraordinary athletes. We find the same thing in everyday life as we take exams, give speeches, or perform solos: For some, these pressures can be daunting, while others take them in stride. Imagine having to pilot a damaged plane, or make life-and-death decisions in an emergency room, or fight in combat. Why do some people seem to perform well under pressure while others choke? According to psychologist and author Hendrie Weisinger, nobody performs better under pressure. Regardless of the task, pressure diminishes our judgment, decision-making, and performance.

GotCredit/flickr creative commons

Gone are the days of graduating from college, paying your dues with a few entry-level positions, and landing a 30-year career with a big corporation, complete with retirement benefits.

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