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The Colin McEnroe Show

Weekdays at 1:00 pm and 8:00 pm

We’re asking the people who listen to describe what it sounds like to them. Josh Dobbin, our unofficial ombudsman and possibly most prolific commenter, is taking the first crack.

“The sublime and the ridiculous are often so nearly related, that it is difficult to class them separately.”
Thomas Paine

The Colin McEnroe Show endeavors to prove Paine correct, every weekday. While the topics are unpredictable from one day to the next (previous show topics include whistling, placebos, politics, the nature of divinity, Barbra Streisand, bedbugs, human hydration, dinosaurs, unreliable narrators, ugliness, and raccoons), what is always assured is that a thoughtful, smart, and interesting exploration and conversation with amazing guests will take place about something.

Colin McEnroe is an author, playwright, professor, columnist, and blogger, who is allergic to penicillin and enjoys photographing his dog wearing hats and publishing those photos to the internet. He heads up a team that includes three inquisitive producers (see below) plus the comedy performer Chion Wolf, who doubles as the show's technical producer.

You can stream us live or subscribe on most podcasting platforms. While we are live, call us at (860) 275-7266, or email us anytime at colin@wnpr.org. We're also on Twitter @wnprcolin. To reach us in the newsroom when we're not on air, call (860) 275-7272.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Fibonacci Blue / Creative Commons

Cultural leaders are beating a hasty retreat from President Trump. 

Japanexperterna.se / flickr creative commons

Actually, it's The Atlantic that wonders "Have Smartphones Destroyed a Generation?" And, of course, the answer is, in a word: No. But then, high school kids are less interested in driving than they used to be. Or something. So there's almost a mental health crisis. Or something. The Nose gets into it.

Daniel Orts / Flickr

Since the earliest humans gazed up at the sky, eclipses have been a common occurrence. But only in recent centuries have we come to understood the science behind them. Prior to that, eclipses were regarded as everything from Viking sky wolves to Korean fire-dogs, to African versions of a celestial reconciliation.

NASA's Earth Observatory / Creative Commons

Guam came into America's consciousness this past week as the war of words between President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong Un threatened the island of Guam with nuclear annihilation. The rhetoric has since cooled but America is more aware of how little they really know about Guam or how much the legacy of war is part of their daily life. 

Bernard Goldbach / Creative Commons

The American Psychological Association says the 2016 presidential election was a major source of stress for a majority of Americans regardless of political affiliation. 

DACA / Creative Commons

Hundreds of followers of the white nationalist movement came to Charlottesville over the weekend to protest the planned removal of a statue of Robert E. Lee. The City Council voted to remove it from a park whose name they changed from Lee Park to Emancipation Park.

Annapurna Productions, LLC

Mark Boal is a journalist who has written for Rolling Stone and Playboy and who partnered with Serial on the podcast's second season. Kathryn Bigelow is the director behind movies like Point Blank and Strange Days. As writer and director, Boal and Bigelow have collaborated on three films.

Wikimedia Commons

Native Americans have been getting forced off their land for a long time. Thomas Jefferson forced them from their ancestral home in 1804 after he signed the Louisiana Purchase and promised they shall know the United States as only "friends and benefactors." 

An Ode To Ink

Aug 9, 2017
Zach Reeder / Flickr

From ancient scrolls to modern toner cartridges, ink (in one form or another) has been around for millennia. And while we may take it for granted now, it was for much of that time a precious and coveted substance.

James Baker / flickr creative commons

Where have all the guitar heroes gone? Where has all the guitar music gone? Where have all the guitar sales gone?

Are rumors of the electric guitar's death exaggerated or no?

wikimedia

Attorney General Jeff Sessions said Friday the Justice Department will aggressively pursue the leaking of classified information that undermines national security. This announcement was made following the release by the Washington Post of transcripts between Trump and leaders from Mexico and Australia. 

Netflix

Netflix has marketed its new series "Ozark" as " 'Breaking Bad' plus Jason Bateman," which might make you picture... a funnier version of "Breaking Bad"? "Ozark" is not a funnier version of "Breaking Bad." If anything, it's a bleaker version of "Breaking Bad." And maybe even a more bingeable version of "Breaking Bad"? The Nose might just have an answer to that question.

Femunity / flickr creative commons

As the men of Apollo 11 returned home to ticker tape parades, the women who made their journey possible worked quietly behind the scenes. Since its founding in 1958, NASA has been heavily reliant on the skills of such women, many of whom have gone unrecognized for their bravery and hard work.

Logan Prochaska / Creative Commons
Jonathan McNicol / WNPR

Matt Iannazzo was a baseball star at Norwalk High School, pitching them to an FCIAC title in 2007. At the University of Pittsburgh, he was an All-Conference pitcher. Out of college, Iannazzo signed with the Chicago Cubs and played two seasons near the bottom of their organization. Then he pitched for the Bridgeport Bluefish in the independent Atlantic League of Professional Baseball.

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