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The Colin McEnroe Show

Weekdays at 1:00 pm and 8:00 pm

We’re asking the people who listen to describe what it sounds like to them. Josh Dobbin, our unofficial ombudsman and possibly most prolific commenter, is taking the first crack.

“The sublime and the ridiculous are often so nearly related, that it is difficult to class them separately.”
Thomas Paine

The Colin McEnroe Show endeavors to prove Paine correct, every weekday. While the topics are unpredictable from one day to the next (previous show topics include whistling, placebos, politics, the nature of divinity, Barbra Streisand, bedbugs, human hydration, dinosaurs, unreliable narrators, ugliness, and raccoons), what is always assured is that a thoughtful, smart, and interesting exploration and conversation with amazing guests will take place about something.

Colin McEnroe is an author, playwright, professor, columnist, and blogger, who is allergic to penicillin and enjoys photographing his dog wearing hats and publishing those photos to the internet. He heads up a team that includes three inquisitive producers (see below) plus the comedy performers Chion Wolf, who doubles as the show's technical producer.

You can stream us live or subscribe on most podcasting platforms. While we are live, call us at (860) 275-7266, or email us anytime at colin@wnpr.org. We're also on Twitter @wnprcolin. To reach us in the newsroom when we're not on air, call (860) 275-7272.

Contact producers:

The executive producer is Catie Talarski. The digital editor is Heather Brandon. The technical producer is Chion Wolf.

Spiked Online / Flickr

All cults are not created equal. From the wide array of beliefs they teach, to the variety of people who are involved, cults are as different from each other as are officially recognized religions.

Vito Fun / Flickr Creative Commons

Every year, we do a Song of the Summer show. It always makes people angry. There is no evidence that it has ever made people happy. A lot of it has to do with the way we define the term.

Richard Kelland / flickr creative commons

TiVo. AdBlock. Ad-free subscription options. Cord cutting. The death of print.

There seem to be a lot of signals pointing toward the end of an industry.

Beverly and Pack / Creative Commons

In 2075, Florida and New Orleans are under water, South Carolina is under quarantine, and America is fighting a bloody and brutal Second American Civil War over the continued use of fossil fuels. This is where American War, ​a new novel by Omar El Akkad begins.

Warner Bros. Entertainment/DC Comics

"Wonder Woman" isn't just the first big-budget, blockbuster movie about a female superhero (as if that isn't enough). It also had the biggest opening weekend for a movie directed by a woman (Patty Jenkins) in film history. Oh, and it's at 92 percent on Rotten Tomatoes, which puts it squarely in the territory of "The Dark Knight," "Iron Man," and "Spider-Man 2." Our all-woman (plus Colin) Nose went to see it.

Paul Morigi / Brookings Institution

Colin, along with WNPR's John Dankosky and former FBI special agent Michael Clark, will react to the testimony of former FBI Director James Comey, at Thursday morning's hearing before the Senate Intelligence Committee. 

Treason!

Jun 7, 2017
David / Flickr

Of all the crimes defined by law, only one is mentioned in the U.S. Constitution: Treason! This distinction, however, was not meant to deter dissent, but rather to protect it. Knowing well how England had levied the charge against those whose voices they found subversive, our founders sought to ensure the citizens of their newly formed nation would always be free to disagree with the government.

Tree & J Hensdill / Flickr

The stereotypes around homeschooling have existed for decades. Since the modern homeschooling movement began in the late 20th century, those who favored this educational approach have largely been perceived as white, anti-establishment, radically Christian, and ultra-conservative.

Gabriel Kronisch / Creative Commons

My dream donut is smothered in vanilla frosting, rolled in toasted coconut and filled with lemon cream...mmm donuts.  

Donuts have been part of peoples lives for more than a thousand years -  in ceremony, in houses of worship, even police precincts.  Donuts mean different things to different people but bring different people together as one. Some credit donuts for helping American troops win WWI. We'll tell you that story. But first, tell us yours. 

The Bei Posti / Creative Commons

Seven people were killed and more than forty were injured in the third attack in London in a few months time. If you're like writer Yascha Mounk, you may have reacted not with the shock and disorientation you would expect to feel in response to a barbaric and random act of violence, but the calm clarity of someone who has seen this before and is resigned to see it again.

Chion Wolf / WNPR (file photo)

Hello. Hello? Anybody home? Think, McFly, think!

Oh, wait. Not that Biff. This BIFF: The Berkshire International Film Festival.

Douglas Fernandes / Creative Commons

There's a set of steps and a big stone fireplace sitting in the middle of the woods where I used to walk my dog. I can envision the family living in the house that was part of the neighborhood that got washed away when the Farmington River overflowed its banks in 1955.  My exploration led me to the origin of those steps. 

Frank Grace / Flickr

The eugenics movement of the early 20th century is a dark chapter in our nation's history. And while we may think of it as a practice we've long since abandoned, the truth is a bit more complicated.

Derek Σωκράτης Finch / flickr creative commons

So, it turns out the world didn't end last week. Or the week before that. Or the week before that.

And while it might seem like the events of the last year or so are the disease, maybe they're really just the symptoms; maybe they're really just signs of the dystopia around us.

But, then: Which dystopia?

Hartford Stage

The current production at Hartford Stage is a "grand, crisp and well-tailored yet ultimately unsettling" version of George Bernard Shaw's caustic comedy/drama, "Heartbreak House." The Nose went to see it and weighs in this hour.

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