Energy
8:13 am
Mon September 23, 2013

Two Clean Energy Projects Selected for Connecticut

Credit Oregon Department of Transportation

The state of Connecticut is choosing two clean energy projects to help diversify its energy portfolio. Governor Dannel Malloy announced Friday that a solar installation planned in Sprague and Lisbon, and a wind energy farm in Maine, have signed long-term contracts with electricity distributors Connecticut Light & Power and United Illuminating. The contracts require regulatory approval, and together will provide 3.5 percent of Connecticut’s total energy load.

The Fusion Solar Center, to be located in Sprague and Lisbon, is a 20 MW AC solar photovoltaic system on land mainly owned by the Connecticut-based Fusion Paperboard Company. The project developer is HelioSage Energy, known nationally for its solar expertise.

Number Nine Wind Farm in Maine is a 250 MW land-based wind farm planned in Aroostook County. EDP Renewables North America LLC, an international leader in large-scale wind installations, is the project developer. 

The Department of Energy and Environmental Protection chose the two projects after reviewing 47 proposals. The proposals were submitted in response to legislation authorizing the state to procure energy from renewable sources.

The state hopes to obtain 20 percent of its total electric power from clean energy sources by 2020. The two projects are expected to generate 270 megawatts of energy by the end of 2016. DEEP officials said the projects' electric prices are very competitive.

“The selection of these two projects is a major milestone in implementing our Comprehensive Energy Strategy,” Malloy said. “These projects bring real benefits – cleaner power with no air emissions and improved reliability by diversifying our energy portfolio – all at a cost comparable to electricity generated from conventional power plants. This is the most significant step Connecticut has ever taken to harness the power of clean energy and this announcement is truly a historic moment in Connecticut’s energy history.”