Connecticut First
9:34 pm
Wed January 8, 2014

Malloy Makes a New Cabinet Appointment; Boughton Announces Gubernatorial Run

Jonathan Slifka.
Credit WNPR/CPTV

Governor Dannel Malloy announced an appointment Wednesday to a newly-created cabinet level position within his administration advocating on behalf of the state’s disability community.

Jonathan Slifka will be responsible for increasing outreach on behalf of the governor and executive branch agencies to people with disabilities, in order to provide policy and practical recommendations for advocacy and employment programs.

Danbury Mayor Announces Gubernatorial Bid

Danbury Mayor Mark Boughton announced he's a Republican candidate for governor. The seven-term mayor said Wednesday he's seeking his party's nomination this year because he believes Connecticut residents are not getting their fair share of the American dream. He was the Republican party's nominee for lieutenant governor in 2010.

University of New Haven Student Faces Charges

The student accused of causing the lockdown at the University of New Haven is facing federal charges. William Dong, 23, is charged with unlawful transport. Prosecutors say Dong brought a Bushmaster rifle into Connecticut in September after purchasing it in Pennsylvania. He was spotted carrying two loaded handguns on campus, triggering a lockdown at the university.

Norwalk Man Gets Two Years in Prison

Christopher Entzminger-Joyner was trying to defend himself from local gang members in South Norwalk when he shot three people. Entzminger-Joyner was subsequently picked up with a pistol while out on bond. He was sentenced on Tuesday. Entzminger-Joyner pleaded guilty in November to illegal discharge of a firearm and carrying a pistol without a permit.

Researchers Say Anti-Smoking Efforts Effective

In 1960, we were told cigarette smoking was fun and attractive. Then, in 1964, the U.S. Surgeon General released a groundbreaking report outlining the harmful effects of smoking. It was a compilation of the best scientific evidence at the time. That inspired warning labels and higher taxes on cigarettes, and smoking cessation programs. Now, 50 years later, Yale University researchers estimate that eight million lives have been saved.

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