Connecticut First
4:05 pm
Fri April 18, 2014

Legal Assistance for Low Income Families; Metro-North's Violations

Governor Dannel P Malloy appeared in New Haven Friday to discuss legislation he is proposing that will make legal services more accessible and affordable to low income families. Malloy was joined by Lt. Governor Nancy Wyman, New Haven Mayor Toni Harp, and area legal representatives at the offices of the New Haven Legal Assistance Association…along with clients who have benefited from legal aid services as he made the announcement.

Blumenthal To Examine Metro-North Violations

U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal was in Milford Friday, outlining the scope of the numerous safety violations by Metro-North commuter railways. Data requested from the Federal Railroad Administration reveals 139-safety violations and 552,000 dollars in fines since 2004: That’s five times the amount of any other commuter railway system in the country. Blumenthal says corrective action needs to be taken immediately.

Segarra to Present Hartford's Budget: With A Hole!

Connecticut’s cities and towns are putting the final touches on next year’s municipal state budgets, and on Monday, Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra will present his budget to the city council—with a bit of a hole in it. The proposed budget of 575 million is about 44 million short of the city’s projected revenue, but there is hope. Mayor Segarra was expected to visit the Capitol to ask for the state’s financial help, along with considering other cost-cutting and revenue-generating options. Once the budget is presented, the city council has until the end of May to approve it.

Police Training in Mental Health

Police officers and training in mental health: This has become a major concern in CT, especially since the Newtown shooting tragedy. WNPR has spent time with Police officers in Fairfield, which is responding to this issue by having 18 of its 107 officers trained as part of a Crisis Intervention Team. The program began about 3 years ago, and its goal is to help officers differentiate between a criminal event and a mental health event: A difference which can mean treatment, instead of jail-time. Much of their training is a week-long seminar for officers from throughout the state, sponsored by the Department of Mental health and Addiction Services and the Ct Alliance to Benefit Law Enforcement.

Are Horses 'Vicious?'

By unanimous vote, the CT House passed a bill Thursday declaring that horses are not “Inherently Vicious.” The bill is in response to a recent Supreme Court ruling that upheld an Appellate court ruling in a case of a boy being bitten by a horse in Milford back in 2006. The ruling said a horse belongs to, “a species naturally inclined to do mischief or to be vicious.” Such a legal description would put the state’s billion-dollar horse industry at risk due to increased insurance premiums and legal liabilities…The bill now moves to the state senate.