Education Reform
9:03 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Indiana Repeals Common Core, Connecticut Charges Ahead

Now that Common Core is repealed in Indiana, teachers who spent several years preparing for the standards don't know what to do next.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

This week, the governor of Indiana signed a bill that would repeal the implementation of the Common Core educational standards. Although there are widespread concerns about Common Core in Connecticut, state officials continue to move ahead, but at a slower pace than originally intended.

On WNPR's Where We Live, Kevin Basmadjian, Dean of Quinnipiac University's School of Education, reflected on why Indiana would reject Common Core. "What it sounds like happened in Indiana," he said, "is that it was a little bit more of a principled, or political view that the federal government should not get involved." He said Connecticut seems to be addressing the issue more pragmatically.

A Common Core Task Force set up by Governor Dannel Malloy met for the first time on Tuesday, looking at the implementation of the controversial standards. According to The Hartford Courant, co-chairman of the task force and East Hartford Surperintendent Nate Quesnel dismissed criticisms of Common Core.

From the Courant's article:

"There is one thing we are not going to focus on, and that is the validity of the adoption of Common Core," Quesnel said. "The words caution, the words 'make sure we get this right' — those are the right words. But we are not here to dispute the adoption of Common Core. That isn't what this committee is for."

In a previous statement, Basmadjian said this task force is "a terrific idea, especially if it had been formed two years ago." Students across the state are already taking tests that are tied to the standards.

On Where We Live, Colin McEnroe and CT News Junkie's Christine Stuart discussed the strangely, perhaps forced optimistic take on Common Core at this task force.

Although opponents of Common Core may be pleased that Indiana repealed the standards, teachers aren't sure what's next.