WNPR

Tucker Ives

Digital Producer

Tucker Ives is WNPR's digital producer.

He is a former talk show producer at the station, working on Where We Live, The Colin McEnroe Show, and The Wheelhouse from 2011 to 2016.

Tucker is also a substitute host for WNPR’s Morning Edition and occasionally reports for on-air. On the side, he produces the book podcast Literary Disco.

Tucker graduated from Ithaca College's Roy H. Park School of Communications in 2011 where he majored in Television-Radio with a concentration in international communications. In college, he was a producer, reporter and host at WICB. He started off as an intern and freelancer with WNPR in the summer of 2009.

Tucker grew up in Marlborough, Connecticut where he was a video production nerd at RHAM High School. He now lives in Lebanon with his wife Jillian and gecko Greg.

Ways to Connect

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

This week, Governor Dannel Malloy was announced as the winner of the 2016 John F. Kennedy Profile in Courage Award for his response to the Syrian refugee crisis. It adds to Malloy's national popularity, despite the political struggles in Hartford.

Dex(07) / Creative Commons

The New York Yankees' opening day game was postponed until Tuesday at 1:00 pm, but some fans were still not be able to watch the game on television. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Rep. Joe Courtney joins us to talk about what he's working on in Washington, D.C. for his constituents in eastern Connecticut. One national issue hitting his district particularly hard is the heroin epidemic. What is the federal government's role in combating this problem? 

Also, the U.S. Navy announced this week that Electric Boat would be the main contractor for a new submarine program. How's the health of the rest of the defense industry in the region?

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Consumer advocate and former presidential candidate Ralph Nader doesn't like what he sees on the campaign trail this season, and said part of the problem is the media.

Adavyd / Creative Commons

In his February budget address, Gov. Dannel Malloy outlined the challenges facing the state government. "Connecticut state government must reset our expectations of what we can afford, how we provide services, and how we save for our priorities," said Malloy. "It won't be easy, and it often won't be politically popular." That last part is becoming increasingly evident.

Jamelle Bouie / Creative Commons

During his speech in Cuba, President Barack Obama described just how different this year's presidential race is from those in previous generations. "You had two Cuban Americans in the Republican Party, running against the legacy of a black man who is President, while arguing that they’re the best person to beat the Democratic nominee who will either be a woman or a Democratic Socialist," said Obama.

Adavyd / Creative Commons

Time in the legislative session is starting to run down and the list of things to do remains long. This week on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we’re joined by Capitol reporters to catch us up on what is (and isn’t) getting done. Governor Dannel Malloy is going up against labor unions and asking for concessions to help with the budget but the rank and file union members haven't authorized a renegotiation of the current contract.

Open Grid Scheduler / Flickr Creative Commons

An effort is underway to bring high-speed internet to residents across Connecticut and create competition for the existing cable and broadband companies. The CT Gig Project includes public officials who say it is needed for economic development, competition, and innovation. Opponents don't think the government should get involved in the internet business. 

The winner of NPR Music's 2016 Tiny Desk Contest, Gaelynn Lea, produced a "serpentine, earworm melody" with "tremendous heartache in her poetry," according to judge Robin Hilton. 

Chuck Kennedy / White House

It's that time of the political season when just about every Tuesday seems like a "Super Tuesday." More voters head to the polls, and on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we discuss the results, and take a look at what's ahead for both major political parties.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission / Creative Commons

New York's Indian Point nuclear facility has faced a number of recent incidents including fires, blown transformers, and most recently detection of radioactive water near the facility. This hour, an update on the situation there and in Florida where the Turkey Point nuclear facility is under scrutiny.

We also hear from WNPR’s David DesRoches, who has been following the story of PCBs in Connecticut schools and in Alabama.

Sam Petherbridge / Creative Commons

Like most of the media landscape, public television is changing. The massive hit Downton Abbey wraps up this weekend, and Sesame Street is now premiering new episodes on HBO! But behind the scenes, broadcasters are taking part in an auction to sell of parts of their over-the-air signal. Most of the population has cable so they won’t be affected, but nearly 15 percent of people watch TV with an antennae.

WNPR

The future of some presidential campaigns may be decided on Super Tuesday, further slimming the field of candidates by the time Connecticut votes next month. If you can't wait to vote, maybe you can pass the time by playing an electoral board game created by a Connecticut resident. Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse discusses the results from the Democratic and Republican parties and previews what's to come. 

Open Grid Scheduler / Flickr

An effort is underway to bring high-speed internet to residents across Connecticut and create competition for the existing cable and broadband companies. The CT Gig Project includes public officials who say it is needed for economic development, competition, and innovation. Opponents don't think the government should get involved in the internet business. 

Rik Stevens / New Hampshire Public Radio

In Nevada, Donald Trump cruised to an easy victory in the state’s caucuses. This hour, our weekly news roundtable, The Wheelhouse spends some time wondering whether the Trump juggernaut and the resurgent Hillary Clinton campaign might render our little state’s primary moot (again). 

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