WNPR

Tucker Ives

Digital Producer

Tucker Ives is WNPR's digital producer.

He is a former talk show producer at the station, working on Where We Live, The Colin McEnroe Show, and The Wheelhouse from 2011 to 2016.

Tucker is also a substitute host for WNPR’s Morning Edition and occasionally reports for on-air. On the side, he produces the book podcast Literary Disco.

Tucker graduated from Ithaca College's Roy H. Park School of Communications in 2011 where he majored in Television-Radio with a concentration in international communications. In college, he was a producer, reporter and host at WICB. He started off as an intern and freelancer with WNPR in the summer of 2009.

Tucker grew up in Marlborough, Connecticut where he was a video production nerd at RHAM High School. He now lives in Lebanon with his wife Jillian and gecko Greg.

Ways to Connect

Lennart Tange / Creative Commons

If you're allergic to it, you might be cursing pollen in between sneezes right now. But the process of pollination is essential to plant, animal, and human life. All sorts of insects and animals can be pollinators including bats, bees, moths, butterflies, birds, and even lemurs!

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

The Wheelhouse is moving out of its parents' house (on Where We Live) and is now its own, independent person ...er ...radio show! John and Colin are back with a new edition of our weekly news roundtable after a week away.

After a couple rough and tumble legislative sessions, several lawmakers are not seeking re-election this year, including House Speaker Brendan Sharkey. In the Year of Trump, can Republicans win control of a legislative chamber in Hartford?

Alberto Cairo / ProPublica

A few years ago,  a public outcry forced schools to re-examine their use of seclusion and restraints among students. This hour, we have a conversation with the Office of the Child Advocate about the use of restraints and seclusion in schools. We also hear from a parent of a developmentally disabled student about the challenges she faces in her child’s public school education.

Gloda/iStock / Thinkstock

There's a debate in West Hartford over plans by a for-profit company to open an educational academy for Chinese students in town. The plan would include sending some students to the public high schools.

What are the pros and cons in allowing international students into our public schools at a time when districts face declining enrollment and budget constraints? Is this a creative way to fund public schools or is it detrimental to their mission? 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The state legislature heads into overtime to discuss (and hopefully pass) a budget that was partially unveiled nearly a week after the regular session ended.

This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will discuss how things operated during this legislative session. We also recap the Democratic and Republican state conventions where (eventually) all reporters were credentialed to cover the proceedings if they wanted to. But this has us thinking about the press and the 2016 election overall this year. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Ten years ago, Democratic political newcomer Ned Lamont launched a bid to unseat his party’s incumbent U.S. senator. He defeated Joe Lieberman in the primary and brought national political attention to Connecticut. But 2006 was also the year that our show launched. This hour, we look back at that campaign with Lamont and talk about what has happened in the state and country since then. 

Krissy Venosdale / Creative Commons

In his State of the State address, Governor Dan Malloy asked legislators not to wait until the last day of the session to pass a budget. At the time, lawmakers gave him a standing ovation. Flash forward a few months to the waning hours of the regular session, and what still needs to be passed? The state budget.

Nuclear Regulatory Commission / Flickr Creative Commons

New York's Indian Point nuclear facility has faced a number of recent incidents including fires, blown transformers, and most recently detection of radioactive water near the facility. This hour, an update on the situation there and in Florida where the Turkey Point nuclear facility is under scrutiny.

We also hear from WNPR’s David DesRoches, who has been following the story of PCBs in Connecticut schools and in Alabama.

WNPR

As presidential candidates crisscross the United States, they have to learn how to win in open primaries, closed primaries, and caucuses. If they want their party's nomination, they need support from average voters and the more high-profile superdelegates. Candidates also must navigate the unique and varying rules of each state's contest. We haven't even gotten to the general election and the electoral college rules!

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The current legislative impasse over the state budget is less between political parties and more between branches of government. Gov. Dannel Malloy received plenty of criticism from members of his own party after releasing his revised budget proposal that makes widespread cuts to services and aid. Connecticut also hasn't completely put the lid on this year's budget.

This hour, we're joined in-studio by the governor to share his views on what's happening in the state capitol and how these debates can be resolved.

Tucker Ives / WNPR

Just a few weeks ago, Connecticut started to write-off its importance in the presidential nomination process. But then Bernie Sanders picked up steam and Donald Trump's campaign faltered. With less than a week before Connecticut residents cast their ballots, the candidates are making public stops across the state. Trump was in Hartford last week, and Hillary Clinton and John Kasich have visits scheduled this week.

Illustration by Mary Lou Cooke for WNPR / Photos by Robert H. Goun and Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Connecticut Democrats and Republicans vote for their party's nominee next week and a new Quinnipiac University poll shows Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump with statewide leads.

Tucker Ives / WNPR

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump tailored his stump speech for the economic problems facing the state of Connecticut. He spoke to roughly 6,000 to 7,000 people at the Hartford Convention Center Friday night. Those who made it inside were met by thousands of protesters when they left.

Heather Brandon and Mary Lou Cooke digital illustration / Chion Wolf photo / Gerald R. Ford Presidential Museum photo / WNPR / Creative Commons

As a sitting governor running for re-election in 2014, Dannel Malloy gave himself a nickname on Where We Live.

"You don't have to love me," said Malloy. "I'm a porcupine." The public is being reminded of Malloy's prickly side as he moves forwards with state employee layoffs. This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse discusses the jobs cuts and what impact they will have on the state's residents.

Robert Markowitz and Bill Stafford / NASA Robonaut Lab

The U.S. and world economies were revolutionized by globalization and later by the digital revolution. What's coming next? This hour, we sit down with someone who has an idea of what's to come. Alec Ross served as Senior Advisor for Innovation to then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton. He tells us how emerging fields like robotics and genomics are changing the way we live and work.

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