Tucker Ives

Producer

Tucker Ives produces WNPR’s talk shows, Where We Live and The Colin McEnroe Show. He produced the PRNDI award-winning episode on the world of children’s television in 2010 and his reporting on the last remaining bell factory in the country destroyed in a fire aired on NPR’s Morning Edition.

Tucker graduated from Ithaca College's Roy H. Park School of Communication in 2011 where he was a producer, reporter and host at WICB. He started off as an intern and freelancer with WNPR in the summer of 2009 and kept coming back for more until he was hired full-time in 2011.

In addition to producing Where We Live and The Colin McEnroe Show, Tucker is the producer and a substitute host for WNPR’s Morning Edition and occasionally reports for WNPR. On the side, he produces the book podcast Literary Disco.

During his Ithaca College years, Tucker was a Television-Radio major with a concentration in International Communications. He traveled to Qatar for a research project focused on the pan-Arab television network, Al Jazeera Children’s Channel. Tucker was also a producer for a documentary film on a third-party candidate running for mayor of New York City. He presented his research on obscenity regulations in the media at the National Conference for Undergraduate Research in 2011. 

Tucker grew up in Marlborough, Connecticut where he was a video production nerd at RHAM High School. He now lives in Vernon with his wife Jillian and his iPad. According to his 6th grade yearbook, Tucker initially wanted to be a professional baseball manager. He settled for merely being a fantasy baseball manager. In real life, his favorite team is the Yankees and proudly sat in the last row of the nosebleed section for Game 7 of the 2003 ALCS.

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What if you had the ability to read the emotions, the thoughts, the concerns of your city in real time, at any time? What if you could then use that information to help your community -- to build stronger policies, and foster better relationships with those around you? 

sima dimitric / Creative Commons

A new report from the Institute of Medicine takes a closer look at end-of-life care in the U.S. The report, called "Dying in America", shines light on the quality of care available to those nearing the end of life -- offering some recommendations on how to make care more sustainable and accessible to patients and their families. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

We take certain things for granted. Like the mountains, rivers and rocks around us.

So what made Connecticut look the way it looks today? As you kayak on the Connecticut River, drive over Talcott Mountain, or swim in Long Island Sound...there are millions of years of history underneath you.

Chion Wolf/Mara Lavitt / WNPR

Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse has finally had a chance to breath after last week’s election that leaves the next four years looking a lot like the last four years in Connecticut. Our panel of reporters and analysts will close the books on the 2014 election and preview what’s to come in Governor Malloy's second term in office.

Anne Farrow

Connecticut played a big role in slavery and the Holocaust...but most of us don't know about it.

First, a powerful New London merchant and ship owner sailed his ships to West Africa and the Caribbean for more than 40 years during the late 18th century to trade in slaves whose labor lined the pockets of his most respected family.

Kevin Dooley / Creative Commons

According to a new scorecard from the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Connecticut has dropped to sixth place in the national ranking of state energy efficiency. 

Jessica Whittle / Creative Commons

One of the most basic functions of local government is to protect its citizens. We talk with a panel of local firefighters who do just that.

When a fire breaks out, many Connecticut towns have volunteer forces that go to the rescue. What draws firefighters to this profession that includes a lot more than just fighting fires? Some Connecticut firefighters are even taking it a step further, and are going out west to help fight forest fires.

Marc Brüneke / Creative Commons

A report released by the National Coalition for the Homeless last month shows a growing number of U.S. cities are making it illegal to hand out food to the homeless. Since January 2013, 21 cities have passed legislation restricting food distribution. 

Office of Mayor Finizio / Facebook

After previously saying he would not seek a second term, Democratic New London Mayor Daryl Justin Finizio has changed his mind.

Finizio made his announcement on his Facebook page Wednesday. After announcing in April he would not run for re-election, "many New Londoners came to me, at my office, at my house, on the street, urging me to reconsider and run for re-election," Finizio wrote.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy claimed victory in the race for governor early Wednesday morning, but only by a razor-thin margin. Without final results, the best call he could make was, "We're going to win this thing."

Republican challenger Tom Foley, reluctant to concede, gave a speech announcing that yeah, he probably lost. Also still unclear: results of the races for secretary of the state, comptroller, and treasurer. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's finally here. It is Election Day 2014! For the last year and a half, the field of candidates for governor has been whittled down to Dannel Malloy and Tom Foley (again). Petitioning candidates Jon Pelto and Joe Visconti have come and gone (kind of). And this year's race will go down as one of the nastiest in recent memory. But it's almost over.

The latest Quinnipiac University poll shows that Governor Dannel Malloy has a three-point lead over Republican challenger Tom Foley.

Chris Potter / Creative Commons

Governor Dannel Malloy and Republican challenger Tom Foley have repeatedly said they will not raise taxes. After dropping out of the race as a petitioning candidate, Joe Visconti said it just can't happen.

"I don't know how we can cut enough, even if the legislature agreed with it, and mothball enough programs for us not to have some form of a tax increase unless we grow completely out of it in a miracle situation," Visconti told WNPR.

Chion Wolf

This election cycle, the Connecticut Council on Freedom of Information asked candidates to sign a pledge - to oppose weakening the state’s public document disclosure law, and to require that any attempts to weaken the law be subjected to public hearings and debate.  Only 10% of those to whom this pledge was sent have actually signed it, though. 

santiagostudio.com

Latino voters are overwhelmingly more likely to support Democratic candidates than Republicans, but that has been changing in recent years. The national GOP has talked a lot about being more “inclusive”, even as voter ID laws in places like Texas seem aimed squarely at reducing the number of Latinos able to vote.

NBC Connecticut screenshot

Treasurer Denise Nappier met her Republican challenger on Wednesday night for their first and only debate before the November 4 election.

Nappier and Tim Herbst spent most of the 25 minutes attacking each other in the West Hartford studios of NBC Connecticut.

Chion Wolf

Superintendent of the Hartford Public Schools has always been a challenging job. So challenging, in fact, that few in recent years held it for very long.

In the last two decades, the district went through various restructurings, flirtations with private education companies and state interventions, and was the subject of a landmark anti-discrimination lawsuit. The last two Superintendents - Stephen Adamowski and Kristina Kishimoto worked together to transform district schools - opening up a “choice” program and reorganizing around themed academies and magnet schools.

Columbia City Blog (Flickr Creative Commons)

We're almost there. Today, it’s the final edition of our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse before next Tuesday’s election. We’ll check-in on the final dash to the finish line, from big-name campaign visitors (two Obamas and a Christie), to a state-wide bus tour for Tom Foley. Our panel of reporters and observers will fill you in on what you need to know in the last six days of the campaign. If you love political commercials, then you have six more days to soak them all in.

Raqqa Media Center

A new PBS FRONTLINE documentary explores "The Rise of ISIS." Producer and reporter Martin Smith joins us to talk about his reporting from Iraq, chronicling the conditions that allowed for the so-called Islamic State to become so powerful. He was also on the ground when U.S. airstrikes began this summer.

We also check in with Senator Chris Murphy, who has been a vocal opponent to U.S. military intervention in the crisis, and with a Syrian peace activist who is a part of the Yale World Fellows program.

Toronto Public Library

We’re just over a week away from the November 4 elections, and, so far, we’ve spent a lot of time talking politics here in our state. But what about our neighbors to the north, east, and west? 

Wavian / Creative Commons

It’s been almost two years since Hurricane Sandy tore her way through the Northeast -- leaving behind a trail of destruction throughout much of our region. 

Tim Cook / The Day

Governor Dannel Malloy and petitioning candidate Joe Visconti will meet Thursday night at 7:00 pm for a live forum hosted by NBC Connecticut. Republican nominee Tom Foley is the only candidate who will not be on stage.

Tim Cook / The Day

Gov. Dannel Malloy and Republican challenger Tom Foley may not be trying to make people like them, but they're trying to make the other guy look worse. Now, that Connecticut has the "least positive" race in the nation and the candidates remain in a dead heat in the polls. Malloy told WNPR earlier in the week that he isn't the most lovable guy. Meanwhile, reporters keep asking for Foley's state tax returns and he keeps refusing to hand them over.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse is postponed a day as Republican candidate for governor Tom Foley stops by for his final appearance on Where We Live in the 2014 campaign. We’ll catch up with him about the race, his plans, and the issues facing Connecticut.

CDC Global / Creative Commons

Last week, Pulitzer Prize-winning photojournalist Michel du Cille’s plans to speak at Syracuse University were unexpectedly halted when university officials “uninvited” du Cille -- citing concern over his recent trip to Liberia, where he’d been covering the Ebola outbreak. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

We’re in the home stretch of the 2014 race for governor. Dan Malloy stops by our studio for the hour to discuss his record, the race, and his plans if he’s re-elected. As always, we’ll take your questions for Governor Malloy in our Where We Vote series.

Chion Wolf

Earlier this year, President Barack Obama went to Poland to celebrate the 25th anniversary of democratic elections in Poland. The speech signaled a continued strong relationship between the countries - something forged by the decades of immigration from Poland to the US - a connection that created large Polish-American communities in places like New Britain, CT. 

Phil Whitehouse / Creative Commons

It’s National Boss’s Day, so today we’re diving into the world of office management. 

This hour, we talk to management expert Bruce Tulgan about his new book, The 27 Challenges Managers Face: Step-by-step Solutions to (Nearly) All of Your Management Problems. We learn about some of the challenges managers come up against in the workplace, and find out some of the best ways to handle them.

John Dankosky / WNPR

The latest Quinnipiac poll shows the race for governor is neck and neck and now some political heavy hitters are coming to Connecticut to turn the tide. This hour, it’s our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse. We’ll also discuss a big weeks of debates from the fifth congressional district, to our gubernatorial debate in New London on Thursday.

Connecticut State Democrats / Creative Commons

Connecticut Democrats have faced pressure for more transparency on State Senator Andrew Maynard's condition as election day approaches. His family released a statement on Tuesday regarding his recovery, clarifying that he is still going to be on the November ballot as an incumbent.

Maynard suffered an injury in July. There was some speculation that he might not stand for re-election in his southeastern Connecticut district. 

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