Tucker Ives


Tucker Ives produces WNPR’s talk shows, Where We Live and The Colin McEnroe Show. He produced the PRNDI award-winning episode on the world of children’s television in 2010 and his reporting on the last remaining bell factory in the country destroyed in a fire aired on NPR’s Morning Edition.

Tucker graduated from Ithaca College's Roy H. Park School of Communication in 2011 where he was a producer, reporter and host at WICB. He started off as an intern and freelancer with WNPR in the summer of 2009 and kept coming back for more until he was hired full-time in 2011.

In addition to producing Where We Live and The Colin McEnroe Show, Tucker is the producer and a substitute host for WNPR’s Morning Edition and occasionally reports for WNPR. On the side, he produces the book podcast Literary Disco.

During his Ithaca College years, Tucker was a Television-Radio major with a concentration in International Communications. He traveled to Qatar for a research project focused on the pan-Arab television network, Al Jazeera Children’s Channel. Tucker was also a producer for a documentary film on a third-party candidate running for mayor of New York City. He presented his research on obscenity regulations in the media at the National Conference for Undergraduate Research in 2011. 

Tucker grew up in Marlborough, Connecticut where he was a video production nerd at RHAM High School. He now lives in Vernon with his wife Jillian and his iPad. According to his 6th grade yearbook, Tucker initially wanted to be a professional baseball manager. He settled for merely being a fantasy baseball manager. In real life, his favorite team is the Yankees and proudly sat in the last row of the nosebleed section for Game 7 of the 2003 ALCS.

Ways to Connect

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Earlier this month, a group musicians and activists from Connecticut joined artists from around the country, who traveled to Missouri to participate in events marking the one-year anniversary of Michael Brown's death.

The "All Roads Lead to Ferguson: Black Lives Matter Tour," included musicians like The Peace Poets and Peter Yarrow of the folk group Peter, Paul and Mary.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Pedro Segarra is in the midst of a tight re-election campaign against Democratic challenger Luke Bronin. After walking out of his party’s endorsement convention, Segarra gathered enough signatures to get on the ballot for the September primary. The mayor stops by our studios to discuss his record, plans for the future of the capital city, and the close race he's in.

Chuck Miller / Creative Commons

Is General Electric really looking to leave the state? What’s Connecticut doing to try to keep them? That’s one of the stories we’re talking about on The Wheelhouse, our weekly news roundtable. Also, there's another round of musical chairs in state government and Governor Dan Malloy brings his support of Hillary Clinton to the Granite State.

Steven L. Shepard / Presidio of Monterey Public Affairs

Officials in France and the United States are celebrating the actions of three brave passengers aboard a train who thwarted an attack. Did these passengers do what you're supposed to do in that situation? This hour, we hear from a retired FBI special agent who will tell us how bystanders should respond to violence.

Office of Governor Dannel P. Malloy

The outgoing chief of staff for Governor Dannel Malloy will soon lead the state's Board of Regents for Higher Education. Mark Ojakian will officially start as interim president on September 28, taking over for Gregory Gray, who announced his resignation earlier this month.

John Phelan / Wikimedia Commons

Last week, the state Supreme Court issued its ruling on capital punishment and completely repealed it - including for those already on death row. This hour on our weekly news roundtable, The Wheelhouse we talk about the decision and answer your questions about how the state’s judicial system works with guests who will hopefully have answers.

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Earlier this summer, we spent a full hour listening to candidates for "song of the summer." Now that summer is winding down, we’re still trying to figure out the winner. Was there a song you just couldn’t get enough of recently? We talk to someone who says for the first time in a long time, there was no "Call Me Maybe," "Blurred Lines," or "California Gurls" (for better or worse).

Also, one popular retailer for music (and everything else) is under harsh criticism. The New York Times reported on the working conditions at "The Everything Store."

In the final segment, we address tall person guilt. Should they feel obligated to stand in back?

John Phelan / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Supreme Court ruled in favor of a full repeal of the state's death penalty on Thursday.

The decision comes more than three years after a repeal of the death penalty for crimes committed after the law was enacted. It means that eleven people currently on death row in the state will be spared execution.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It’s a big year for local politics in Connecticut -- and not just Hartford and Bridgeport.

This hour, we check in on the race for mayor in New London.

As we do on most weeks, we catch you up on other stories from across the state, including how to fund the $100 billion transportation overhaul, MGM's desire to get in on the Connecticut casino expansion battle, and the future of juvenile detention facilities.

Ed Schipul/flickr creative commons

Athletes have always used their elevated platform to advance products and ideas. After a game winning play, it's almost expected to hear the star thank either God, the Lord, and/or Jesus. But you won't hear that from Houston Texan running back Arian Foster. He just came out as an atheist playing football for a NFL team in the bible belt. How will that play out?

Chion Wolf

A Central Connecticut State University professor is suspended after the latest in a string of arrests. Ravi Shankar, a poetry professor, was arrested for third-degree larceny after attempting to return unpaid merchandise for store credit at a Middletown Home Depot.


More than 25 years ago, one of the most infamous art heists in history occurred at the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston, Massachusetts. On Thursday, federal law enforcement officials released new surveillance video from the eve of the heist that shows a possible "dry run" of the theft.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

As President Barack Obama made his case for the Iran nuclear agreement at American University on Wednesday, U.S. Senator Chris Murphy took to the floor of his chamber to come out in favor of the controversial deal. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Pushing the line of ethics is nothing new in politics. That is part of the reason voters are frustrated when it continues to happen. Former Bridgeport Mayor Joe Ganim is hoping to return to his former office after a stint in prison on corruption charges. The former house Republicans chief of staff faces up to 15 months in prison for collecting kickbacks. And the Connecticut Democratic Party is trying to avoid complying with a subpoena issued by state election officials.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Internally, NPR has debated when and where it is appropriate to swear. If the President of the United States says the N-word, should it be bleeped on the radio? Can a public radio host swear on a podcast? There are lots of questions about offensive language in 2015, with so many different mediums and changing social norms.

We also discuss news that Vice President Joe Biden might be looking for a promotion to the Oval Office.

Finally, is Yelp in a "death spiral"?

Cloe Poisson / Courtesy of The Hartford Courant

After coming up short for the Democratic endorsement, Bridgeport mayoral candidate Joe Ganim is focused on the September primary. 


The mayor of Bridgeport was narrowly endorsed by local Democrats in his second re-election campaign.

Mayor Bill Finch faces a strong challenge from a former mayor, Joseph Ganim, who is making a comeback bid after serving seven years in prison for corruption while mayor of Bridgeport.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Local races across the state have caught our eye: from the crowded field running for mayor in Hartford, to the Bridgeport race pitting the incumbent versus a former mayor who went to jail for corruption when in office. This hour on our weekly news roundtable, The Wheelhouse,  we check-in on those races and more news from across the state.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

All eyes are on Congress as lawmakers debate the Iran nuclear agreement. This hour, we speak with Connecticut's 2nd district Rep. Joe Courtney. He called the tentative deal a "hopeful development" when it was first announced.

Jonas Dahlbert

In 2011, Anders Behring Breivik killed 77 people in Norway, most of them teenagers. He's serving a 21-year prison term, which can be extended. But in the meantime, he'll study political science at Oslo University from his prison cell. 

Chuck Kennedy / White House

President Barack Obama has more to say about the Iran nuclear deal.

Obama held a news conference on Wednesday to continue selling the agreement that he contends will cut off all the pathways Iran currently has to develop a nuclear weapon.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It has been a full three weeks since The Wheelhouse was last on the air due to vacations and unexpected absences. That means we have no shortage of news to talk about. This hour, our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will recap the last three (!?) weeks in news with intrepid reporters who stuck around to cover the special session and all the fallout from the budget implementer. We discuss that at-length on this week's edition of The Wheelhouse.

This week, the long-awaited sequel to Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird hits bookshelves. Since it was announced, questions were raised about Lee's involvement in the release of this book. But now the conversation has changed to the content of the book. A New York Times review reveals the much beloved character of Atticus Finch was a racist during the Brown v. Board of Education era of the 1950s.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Former Connecticut U.S. Senator Chris Dodd's name is being floated as a possible candidate to become the first U.S. ambassador to Cuba in more than half a century.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

While all the other members of Connecticut's congressional delegation voted against it, Jim Himes has been a strong supporter of "fast track" trade authority, which allows the president to negotiate with 11 other Pacific nations.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy has vetoed three pieces of education legislation, including a bill to increase the number of student seats on the University of Connecticut's Board of Trustees.

Official White House portrait of Thomas Jefferson; James Tooley, Jr. portrait of Andrew Jackson / Creative Commons

Like several other states, Connecticut's Democratic Party hosts its annual Jefferson Jackson Bailey Dinner next week. Like others, the party is also revisiting the name of this fundraiser.

The event is named after national historical figures Thomas Jefferson and Andrew Jackson. State political operative John Moran Bailey's name is added to Connecticut's dinner.

Stevie Gill / Creative Commons

If the State of Connecticut was a college student, it would be the one who crams for every exam and writes every final paper the night before. We say this, because the fiscal year starts on July 1, and a special session to finish the details of the state budget is reportedly scheduled for the last two days of June.

MGM Springfield

Governor Dannel Malloy has signed a bill setting out a multi-step process that could lead to a new tribal casino along the Connecticut border. The measure allows the tribes to request proposals from communities interested in hosting a casino.

Lee Stranahan / Creative Commons

In the wake of another mass shooting, President Barack Obama took the podium in the White House press briefing room to address reporters. The shooting in a black church brings up a "dark part" of United States history. "This is not the first time that black churches have been attacked, and we know the hatred across races and faiths pose a particular threat to our democracy and our ideals," Obama said.

This hour, we explore several threads of the post-Charleston shooting, from the symbols of racism to the use of mental health to explain tragedy.