WNPR

Sujata Srinivasan

Reporter

Sujata reports for the WNPR News business desk. Her features range from small business, entrepreneurship, innovation and microfinance to local impact of quantitative easing and changing trendsin global markets. She’s reported from abroad for WNPR and helped develop a segment on jobs and economic recovery, part of the business coverage.

A fulltime freelancer, her work has appeared in numerous publications including the Hartford Business Journal, Forbes.com and the Indian edition of Forbes, where she’s had the honor of interviewing several Nobel Laureates in economics. She was also invited to cover the U.S. Department of State’s Global Diaspora Forum, hosted by Hillary Clinton. Previously, Sujata was the editor of the now defunct Connecticut Business Magazine, where she assigned and edited award-winning writing. She’s worked as an adjunct professor of economics; a senior editor at an investment firm; and was the interim bureau chief at CNBC-TV 18 in Chennai, India. At CNBC India, her occasional non-business reporting included the sensational kidnapping of a movie star by a sandalwood bandit.

Sujata has a master’s degree in economics from Trinity College, Hartford; a post-graduate diploma in journalism from the Times School of Journalism, New Delhi; and a bachelor’s degree in Business Administration from the University of Madras, Chennai. She is a recipient of the Jon Davidoff Scholarship for journalists from Wesleyan University.

Hunger, education, and poverty alleviation through entrepreneurship are the causes that she supports through donations and by organizing monthly food drives. A great fan of Mark Twain, she authored Twain’s biography for children, produced as a CD by Allegro Corp. Sujata and her husband enjoy scenic walks in beautiful New England, museums, theatre and travel. Favorites include watching the sunrise on Cadillac Mountain and sunset in Key West, kayaking in the Bermuda Triangle and seeing Much Ado About Nothing at Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre.

Sujata Srinivasan

A new study finds that the way teachers interact with young children while they play, can have a powerful impact on toddlers’ mathematical abilities. WNPR visits a pre-school on the campus of Eastern Connecticut State University.

This toddler is rolling a dice on a board game, trying to figure out how many spaces to get to a pig. Along the way, his teacher is constantly engaging him in “math talk.” The child was one of about 65 four and five-year-olds in a study on the importance of math education during play.

Professor Sudha Swaminathan.

Sujata Srinivasan

A new study finds that the way teachers interact with young children while they play, can have a powerful impact on toddlers’ mathematical abilities. WNPR visits a pre-school on the campus of Eastern Connecticut State University.

This toddler is rolling a dice on a board game, trying to figure out how many spaces to get to a pig. Along the way, his teacher is constantly engaging him in “math talk.” The child was one of about 65 four and five-year-olds in a study on the importance of math education during play.

Professor Sudha Swaminathan.

Sujata Srinivasan

U.S. student loan debt is at $1 trillion and growing. The average college-related debt for a graduate is now $35,000. That has some students questioning the value of a college degree. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan met some entrepreneurs who began their companies fresh out of high school.

 

Sujata Srinivasan

The great recession drove many companies to look for sales overseas. A new survey of Connecticut companies shows that half of those responding said exports helped them weather the downturn. Now, domestic markets are looking up, but those firms still want to diversify across the world. WNPR's Sujata Srinivasan reports.

 

Sujata Srinivasan

The recent growth in farmer's markets in Connecticut speaks to the increasing popularity of locally grown food. Now the state's Department of Agriculture has big plans for Connecticut-grown produce to fuel the economy and create jobs.  

Wikimedia Commons

When GE Capital announced it will no longer finance gun purchases at small firearms dealers, it predictably drew both praise and criticism. But the company’s own explanation of the move seemed to raise more questions than it answered. 

Sujata Srinivasan

Almost six months after Superstorm Sandy, some businesses are still fighting to get back on their feet. Pop’s Grocery, a 52-year-old corner store in Bridgeport, was inundated by floodwater during the storm. As part of her series on recovery after Sandy, WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan went back to visit.

Sujata Srinivasan

Almost six months after Superstorm Sandy, some businesses are still fighting to get back on their feet. Pop’s Grocery, a 52-year-old corner store in Bridgeport, was inundated by floodwater during the storm. As part of her series on recovery after Sandy, WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan went back to visit.

Sujata Srinivasan

The Connecticut Department of Labor says economic recovery is taking longer than expected because of the lingering effects of a balance sheet recession  – the most severe of its kind. Sectors saw steep reductions in their networth and consumers are still paying off personal debt. It’s a delicate environment where any negative trends could tip the apple cart, say economists at a panel discussion at the Labor Department. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports. 

 

Living the Dream

Apr 11, 2013

Conventional career wisdom dictates that kids choose a solid profession where jobs are plentiful and paychecks are large. But certainty doesn't appeal to everyone. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan meets some young people who instead, are following their dreams.

“Dance has the ability to take you places that being, you know an accountant or working a retail job just couldn’t take you.”

Sujata Srinivasan

Specialty foods like handcrafted chocolate and gluten-free organic pasta may be pricey, but some small business owners say they’re seeing a pick up in demand. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports on how entrepreneurs in the high-end food business have pulled through the recession, priming their business for growth.

 

Despite the economic downturn, aerospace is a thriving international business. But for small manufacturers in Connecticut, it can be a challenge to plug into global markets. This summer, some of them will have a chance to show their wares at the famous Paris Air Show. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports.

Sujata Srinivasan

Europe’s economy is in trouble. Just last week, the European Commission said it believes the continent is about to see a second consecutive year of economic contraction. That could be bad news for some companies in the Nutmeg state, as WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports.

 

Sean Mack, Wikimedia Commons

Connecticut’s recovery has been marked by persistent high unemployment. But many employers are starting to complain that they can’t find the skilled workers they need. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan asks – is that because they aren’t out there, or could it be that they’re just hard to find?

Sujata Srinivasan

State officials have warned businesses and municipalities to clear roofs of snow loads to prevent possible collapse from the weight. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports.

 

Heavy rain on Monday in addition to three feet of snow over the weekend, is putting quite a bit of load on rooftops. Gov. Dannel Malloy at a press conference in Branford:

 

Sujata Srinivasan

The state unemployment rate dropped for the second month in a row in December. But the numbers have been volatile with intermittent highs and lows that sometimes don’t seem to add up. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan takes a look at why short-term figures may not always show the long-term picture. 

Sujata Srinivasan

Microfinance – or small-scale loans – has rapidly grown into an international business that connects investors with impoverished borrowers around the world. Currently, microfinance institutions (MFIs) operate in over 100 countries and fund more than 92 million borrowers, according to the Microfinance Information Exchange. For-profit firms like Stamford-based Developing World Markets (DWM) invest in MFIs in India, which in turn provide loans to poor entrepreneurs, primarily women.

Heather Brandon / WNPR

It might come as a surprise that recycled garbage makes quite an impact on the state’s economy. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan takes a look at the sweet side of trash.

The National Flood Insurance Program promises help for businesses and homeowners caught in devastating weather events like Sandy. But it’s a huge burden on taxpayers, and some critics argue that it encourages building in flood-prone areas. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports on how new rate increases for the program might affect its future.

Nearly 40% of small businesses that sustain severe flood damage in natural disasters subsequently close down. Pop’s Grocery on Main Street in Bridgeport is struggling to stay off that list.

NASA

Storms like Sandy are a huge liability for homeowners, businesses, and insurers. And one forecast say future weather-related losses will increase by up to 30% in Northeast coastal regions. Now some are asking if the insurance market could be a new lever to mitigate weather-related risks. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports on the opportunities for green insurance products.

Sujata Srinivasan

If you’re a business owner affected by Superstorm Sandy, you may be eligible for a loan from the U.S. Small Business Administration. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports from a FEMA Disaster Recovery Center in Bridgeport.

Harriet Jones

It’s time for additional hiring in some industries, as we head into the holiday season. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports on the outlook for seasonal employment this year.

Connecticut retailers are cautiously optimistic at what could be a promising holiday season. A key indicator, the Consumer Confidence Index measured by the Conference Board rose nine points this September, rebounding to levels seen earlier in February. Timothy Phelan is president of the Connecticut Retail Merchants Association.

Sujata Srinivasan

The US Federal Reserve launched a third round of quantitative easing last week, concerned about a lack of consumer and business spending. Dubbed QE3, the policy’s great for borrowers, bad for retirees on fixed income, and a mixed bag for Connecticut regional banks. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports.

Sujata Srinivasan.

Courtesy Tigerplish, Flickr Creative Commons

You’d think most entrepreneurs would follow the Facebook formula for success. Take an idea, bankroll it with venture capital, and float an initial public offering worth billions of dollars. But that’s not what every start-up wants. WNPR’s Sujata Srinivasan reports.

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