Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Updated at 11:25 a.m. ET

Secretary of State John Kerry presided over a ceremony reopening the U.S. Embassy in Havana, including a flag-raising ceremony — an event that will mark the first time the Stars and Stripes have flown over a diplomatic compound there in 54 years.

Kerry, speaking before assembled dignitaries, remembered the strained history of U.S.-Cuba relations, including the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis, when the Soviet Union was discovered to be siting nuclear rockets on the island nation.

In a 24-hour marathon session, Greek lawmakers approved the draft of an 85 billion euro bailout reached earlier this week with international lenders — agreeing to many of the austerity measures that voters rejected in a referendum last month and sparking a rebellion in the ruling party ranks.

Al-Qaida leader Ayman al-Zawahiri has released an audio message pledging loyalty to the new head of the Afghan Taliban, Mullah Akhtar Mansoor, who was chosen recently to succeed Mullah Omar.

This year's El Niño is shaping up to be a whopper — potentially surpassing the one in 1997, which was the strongest on record, the National Weather Service says.

That could be good news for drought-stricken California, but not-so-good for places such as the Philippines and Indonesia, which typically experience below-normal rainfall or drought conditions during El Niños.

If you thought that professional video game competitions would be the one sport immune to a doping scandal, you'd be wrong.

Security forces in Myanmar have surrounded the headquarters of the ruling USDP and ousted its chief in the culmination of an intra-party feud less than three months before a general election.

Shwe Mann, the influential speaker of the parliament who has been considered a leading contender for the presidency, has been removed from his role as chairman of the Union Solidarity Development Party. Thein Sein, the party's president said to be behind his ouster, will take over Mann's position, according to a statement from the party.

The self-declared Islamic State has claimed responsibility for a truck bomb attack in Baghdad that has killed at least 67 people.

Reports of casualties vary. The 67 figure comes from The Associated Press, but Reuters says 76 are dead and al-Jazeera is reporting "at least 55."

NFL Football Hall of Famer and longtime sports broadcaster Frank Gifford died Sunday at his Connecticut home at age 84.

He "died suddenly this beautiful Sunday morning of natural causes," the family confirmed in a brief statement.

Receiver and running back Gifford attended the University of Southern California on a football scholarship before going pro. He played for the New York Giants in a career on the field that spanned 1952 to 1964. He made the Pro Bowl in seven of his 12 NFL seasons.

The Australian government is warning that Vegemite – the salty yeast-based spread that's an iconic staple of the national diet – is being purchased in bulk quantities to produce moonshine in rural indigenous communities where alcohol is banned.

Brewer's yeast is a key ingredient of the dark brown paste, which was first developed as a substitute for Marmite when the supply of the British-made spread in Australia was virtually cut off during World War I.

Typhoon Soudelor, fresh from causing devastation on Taiwan, has left a dozen dead and five missing in mainland China as it caused floods and mudslides even as it ground down to tropical storm status.

The storm made landfall in China's Fujian province late Saturday after causing six deaths in Taiwan and leaving hundreds of thousands there without electricity.

Japan today marked the 70 years since the dropping of the second of two U.S. atomic bombs that helped end World War II in the Pacific.

In the city of Nagasaki, where more than 70,000 people died in the bombing that came after even greater loss of life at the city of Hiroshima, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe restated his country's pledge never to allow nuclear weapons on Japanese soil.

A tense late-night standoff between sheriff's deputies and a gunman at a home in Houston ended with eight people dead, including five children, Texas authorities say. But it wasn't immediately clear how the victims died.

According to KHOU television, the incident began at about 9 p.m., when deputies were called to the home to perform a welfare check.

A year after Michael Brown, an unarmed black 18-year-old, was fatally shot by a white police officer in Ferguson, Mo., sparking weeks of often violent protests in the city, the country is still struggling to deal with the issues the shooting, and others like it, have brought to the fore.

Typhoon Soudelor — fresh from hitting Taiwan, where it left a handful dead and millions without electricity — is now ashore in mainland China, where it is expected to push inland before losing steam over the weekend.

At least six people were killed and 101 others injured when Soudelor barreled through Taiwan, according to The Associated Press. Among the dead were an 8-year-old girl and her mother, who were swept out to sea and drowned on Thursday.

Dr. Frances Oldham Kelsey, whose tireless efforts uncovered a link between the drug thalidomide and severe birth defects, has died at age 101.

In 1960, Kelsey was the new medical officer at the Food and Drug Administration when an application for FDA approval of the sedative Kevadon, the trade name of thalidomide, manufactured by drug company William S. Merrell Company of Cincinnati.

Thalidomide had already been sold to pregnant women in Europe and elsewhere as an anti-nausea drug to treat morning sickness, and Merrell wanted a license to do the same in the U.S.

An ex-Soviet army officer turned Taliban commander has been found guilty in a federal court in Richmond, Va., on 15 counts related to a 2009 attack on Afghan and U.S. soldiers at Camp Leyza in Afghanistan's Khost province.

Irek Hamidullin, 55, is a former Soviet tank commander who stayed behind in Afghanistan after the Soviet withdrawal in the late 1980s.

Updated at 11:40 a.m. ET

Despite Thursday night's debate having solidified Donald Trump's standing as a GOP frontrunner, he's not backing off of a feud with Fox News host and debate moderator Megyn Kelly, who he calls a "lightweight" who is "highly overrated."

And this:

But wait. There's more ...

The Detroit News reports that a prominent Tea Party-inspired state representative in Michigan sought to cover up an affair with a female lawmaker by spreading a rumor about himself that he had engaged in a public sex act with a male prostitute.

Niloy Chakrabati Neel, a Bangladeshi blogger who used the pen name Niloy Neel to criticize Muslim extremism, was hacked to death by a machete-wielding gang who broke into his apartment Friday. He is the fourth such social media activist to be killed in the South Asian country so far this year.

"They entered his room on the fifth floor and shoved his friend aside and then hacked him to death," Imran H. Sarker, head of the Bangladesh Blogger and Online Activist Network, or BOAN, tells Agence France-Presse.

Updated at 9:50 a.m. ET

The U.S. economy added 215,000 jobs last month, just shy of the number forecast by economists. The unemployment rate remained unchanged at 5.3 percent.

Wages were up slightly, and the number of long-term unemployed remained the same as June.

Some might say that a trip to North Korea is like stepping back in time. Beginning next week, it will also include setting your watch back by 30 minutes.

As of Aug. 15, according to the country's official news agency KCNA, North Korea will be in a new time zone to mark the 70th anniversary of its liberation from the Japanese at the end of World War II.

Beginning in 1910, when Japan colonized Korea, Tokyo moved the peninsula's time zone ahead half an hour to match its own and "deprived Korea of even its standard time," KCNA writes.

After 16 years of honing a unique brand of political satire that has been much copied, but rarely equaled, Jon Stewart signed off for his final episode of The Daily Show with a list of guests who either helped create the jokes or were on the receiving end of them over the years.

"Guess what?" Stewart opened. "I've got big news. This is it."

The 52-year-old comic announced last winter that he would be stepping down from the Comedy Central powerhouse, with Trevor Noah set to take over the hosting duties.

The remains of two Japanese climbers, who disappeared on the Matterhorn in the Swiss Alps in 1970, have been found on a glacier at the famed mountain.

Swiss police say that DNA testing has confirmed the remains — found at an altitude of 9,200 feet on the 14,692-foot peak — are Michio Oikawa and Masayuki Kobayashi, 22 and 21, respectively, who were reported missing on Aug. 18, 1970, according to Agence France-Presse.

The crash in March of a vintage single-engine airplane piloted by actor Harrison Ford is being blamed on a malfunction in the engine, according to a report released by the National Transportation Safety Board.

The last defendant in the Bernard Madoff Ponzi scheme is going to jail three years after he pleaded guilty to helping conceal the massive fraud from regulators.

Irwin Lipkin, 77, will spend six months in prison for his role in the scheme that defrauded investors of billions of dollars in investments.

Japan marked the 70th anniversary of the devastating atomic bombing of Hiroshima in the closing days of World War II with calls to step up efforts to eliminate nuclear weapons, even as Tokyo still struggles to come to terms with its role in the conflict.

Egypt has completed a major expansion of the Suez Canal after a furious year of construction, opening the new 22-mile cut in a third of the time that was initially forecast.

The $8.5 billion expansion allows two-way traffic and deepens and widens portions of the existing channels to accommodate larger vessels. Before the new construction, about 50 vessels a day transited the 146-year-old canal linking the Red Sea to the Mediterranean.

At the stroke of midnight, tens of thousands of Indians and Bangladeshis living near the border between the two countries got their own country for the first time in 70 years.

As part of an agreement between the two nations, the fate of just under 15,000 people living in 51 Bangladeshi enclaves inside India and more than 37,000 in 111 Indian enclaves in Bangladesh has finally been determined. Most will stay where they are, but change their nationality. Some are moving, and some of them are leaving behind family members.

Close on the heels of a U.S. Supreme Court decision that granted Texas the right to refuse to issue Confederate-themed license plates, a federal judge has effectively vacated a state injunction in Virginia that kept officials there from similarly blocking such plates.

Judge Jackson L. Kiser will issue a separate written order on whether the 1,700 Confederate license plates that have already been issued can be recalled by the state.

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

A judge entered pleas of not guilty to 33 federal hate crime counts against Dylann Roof, the white suspect accused of gunning down nine parishioners at a black church in Charleston, S.C., last month.

Pages