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Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

President Trump is taking a dog-eared page from the unofficial White House manual: When things are bad at home, go abroad.

With his domestic agenda seemingly stalled and indictments this week from special counsel Robert Mueller's office, the president will set off for Asia, where he no doubt hopes to shift the focus from Russia to North Korea.

It will be Trump's first trip to Asia as president — with a brief stop in Hawaii before heading to Japan, South Korea, China, Vietnam and the Philippines that wraps up on Nov. 14.

Updated at 5:10 a.m. ET

Hillary Clinton's campaign gained significant control over the Democratic National Committee's finances and strategy more than a year before the election in exchange for helping the party retire lingering debt from the 2012 presidential campaign, according to a new book by a former party chairwoman.

Updated at 2:25 p.m. ET

Updated at 10:12 a.m. ET

Ousted Catalan leader Carles Puigdemont has ignored a court order to return to Spain to face charges of sedition, though several other ministers of his deposed government did appear in court for questioning Thursday.

Updated at 9:03 a.m. ET

A day after the deadly terrorist attack in New York City that killed at least eight people, President Trump said suspect Sayfullo Saipov should get the death penalty and that he would consider sending Saipov to Guantanamo Bay even though he has already been charged in civilian court.

Updated at 11:58 a.m. ET

Editor's note: This story includes explicit language describing alleged sexual assaults.

Actor Dustin Hoffman and director Brett Ratner are the latest Hollywood figures to be accused of sexual misconduct.

Myanmar leader Aung San Suu Kyi, who has been heavily criticized for failing to stop ongoing violence against the country's Rohingya minority in western Rakhine state, visited the region for the first time since attacks there triggered a refugee crisis.

Suu Kyi arrived in the state capital of Sittwe before heading north, where many Rohingya villages are located, the government reported.

Lawmakers in Catalonia have declared independence from Spain in a historic vote that prompted protests and celebration.

The government in Madrid, vowing to halt any would-be secession, has authorized the Spanish prime minister to take over direct rule of the previously semi-autonomous region. Prime Minister Mariano Rajoy says he's dissolving the regional government, with new elections to be held on Dec. 21, The Associated Press reports.

It was the late summer of 1962.

The previous year, the U.S. invasion of the Bay of Pigs, meant to topple the communist regime of Fidel Castro, had been an embarrassing failure.

The administration of President John F. Kennedy had turned instead to a Plan B to destabilize Cuba and hopefully take down Castro: Operation Mongoose.

Was the Soviet Union involved in the 1963 assassination of President John F. Kennedy?

Given Cold War tensions and the fact that shooter Lee Harvey Oswald had defected to the Soviet Union and lived there in the years leading up to the assassination, it's a question that has long intrigued even the mildly conspiracy-minded.

Some 2,800 documents released by order of President Trump on Thursday provide some possible insights into how the assassination was viewed inside the Soviet Union.

A U.N. watchdog agency is blaming the Syrian government for a sarin gas attack on a rebel-held area of the country that killed more than 90 people in April.

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, which confirmed in June that the agent used sarin, now says it is sure that the attack in Khan Sheikhoun in the northern province of Idlib was carried out by the Syrian government of President Bashar al-Assad.

The ambush of a patrol in Niger this month that resulted in the deaths of four U.S. Army soldiers is believed to have been a "set up" in which their location was exposed by villagers who tipped off ISIS-affiliated militants, a U.S. official tells NPR.

NPR Pentagon correspondent Tom Bowman reports that the official, who spoke on condition of anonymity, says when the patrol of U.S. and Niger troops stopped in a village near the border with Mali to get water, locals there gave them "the cold stare."

Final preparations were underway in Thailand for the cremation of the revered late King Bhumibol Adulyadej, who died a year ago at the age of 88. Mourners, dressed in black, watched the elaborate sendoff for the man who was, at the time of his death, the world's longest-reigning monarch.

UPDATED at 6:40 a.m. ET

An arrest warrant has been issued for former Pakistani Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif after he failed to appear in court to face allegations of corruption.

Sharif, who was ousted in July and pleaded not guilty to the charges last week, failed to appear in court and was slapped with a so-called "bailable arrest warrant." The former premier was on a religious pilgrimage in Saudi Arabia at the time of Thursday's hearing, Pakistani media reports.

Updated at 8 p.m. ET

Immigrant advocates are protesting the Border Patrol's apprehension this week of a 10-year-old girl with cerebral palsy in the country illegally, after she was operated on at a Texas hospital.

Federal immigration officers intercepted the child as she and an adult cousin, who is a U.S. citizen, were in an ambulance being transferred between two hospitals so that she could receive emergency gallbladder surgery.

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