WNPR

Ray Hardman

Host/Reporter

Ray Hardman began his broadcasting career at WFSU in Tallahassee Florida where he served at different times as a producer, Operations manager, and Morning Edition host. Ray joined the WNPR staff in 1996, as a reporter and host. He later became the Music Director for WNPR, and in 2002 he went back to his newsy roots as the host of WNPR’s Morning Edition.

From 2002 to 2009 Ray divided his time between WNPR and CPTV, first serving as a correspondent on CPTV’s news magazine Main Street. He later became the host of Main Street, and from 2005 to 2009 was the host and producer for CPTV’s Front and Center with Ray Hardman.

Ray holds degrees from St. Mary's College of Maryland and Florida State University. In his spare time, Ray fronts a garage band called The Radiation. Ray lives in West Hartford with his wife Kathleen, and their sons Benjamin and Jackson. 

Ways to Connect

Chion Wolf

A Group of Yale Undergraduates who participated in Yale's Rainforest expedition and Laboratory course have found an organism that can break down plastic, holding the promise of significantly reducing waste in the world's landfills. Their paper was published in the journal Applied and  Environmental Microbiology.

Joining us by phone is one of those students, and one of the lead authors of the paper, Jon Russell.

Photo by Mark Walz (Flickr)

The Podunk Bluegrass Music Festival gets underway in East Hartford and runs through the weekend. Some of the best Bluegrass acts in the country will perform this weekend. What started 16 years ago as a small get together of local bluegrass musicians and fans has become one of the biggest Bluegrass festivals in the US.

Joining us by phone is C. Roger Moss, director of East Hartford's department of parks and recreation which organizes the event

Journalist and New Haven native Clare Gillis testified before the Senate Judiciary Committee yesterday on a measure that would ensure that the U.S. lives up to its obligations under the Vienna Convention on Consular relations. Earlier this year Gillis was captured and detained in Libya by pro-Qaddafi forces.

She joins us by phone to discuss her situation and what can be done in the future.

Photo by Jurvetson (Flickr)

When the space shuttle Atlantis lifted off on its final mission earlier this month, it brought along a little bit of Hartford with it. A group of eighth graders from the Annie Fisher STEM Magnet School in Hartford's North End wanted to measure the effect of microgravity on Tomato growth, so they wrote a proposal and it was accepted.

We talk to principal Melony Brady about her students' project.

WNPR

In the wake of the failed labor concessions agreement between Governor Dannel Malloy and state labor unions, state agencies are feeling the crunch. The Office of the Chief public defender has to cut about 7.5 percent of their overall budget, which some believe will hinder the states poorest from getting proper legal counsel, and will make it difficult for public defenders to honor their constitutional obligations.

We are joined by Mike Lawlor, undersecretary for criminal justice planning.

Federal lawmakers spent the weekend working on ways to break the standstill in budget talks. While there is still hope that lawmakers can come up with a package of spending cuts and taxes, including President Obama's $4 trillion so called grand bargain, with an August 2 deadline quickly approaching, a simple raise of the debt limit, as proposed by Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell will be the more likely outcome.

Here to talk about reaction from Connecticut's congressional delegation is the Connecticut Mirror's Washington correspondent Deirdre Shesgreen.

Chion Wolf, WNPR

Deficit cutting negotiations with President Obama and Congressional leaders continued yesterday with no apparent progress.  Time is running short to raise the government's debt limit.  We talk to Congressman John Larson about the impasse.

The Science of Song

Jun 10, 2011
Horia Varlan, Creative Commons

A series of tornadoes ripped through the Springfield, Massachusetts area yesterday afternoon, tearing off roots, uprooting trees, scattering debris and leaving at least four dead.  We talked to WNPR's Nancy Cohen who was live at the scene. 

Courtesy of Cloe Poisson, Hartford Courant

DC Central Kitchen, Creative Commons

The Connecticut Health Investigative Team or C-HIT has uncovered that many school cafeterias in Connecticut are not getting regular inspections as required by law.  Some schools, who were cited for various health infractions, did not even get a follow-up inspection to ensure they had resolved their health issue.  We talked to C-HIT reporter and co-founder, Lisa Chedekel about the story.

Electric Cars Power Up

May 5, 2011
JM Rosenfeld, Creative Commons

Earlier this week Connecticut Light & Power Co launched the "Plug My Ride'' campaign to increase awareness of electric and hybrid vehicles in the state.  This also kicked off a research project that aims to understand how an influx of electric vehicles in the near future will affect the region's power grid.   

We spoke with Watson Collins, the electric vehicles project manager for parent company Northeast Utilities, about the company's plans to install up to 30 charging stations by the end of the year.

Children of Bassac

Apr 15, 2011
Long Chean

This Sunday at 7pm, Hartford's Watkinson School host a performance of traditional Cambodian dance by the dance troupe, The Children of Bassac, Joining us by phone to talk about the troupe, and the performance is Phloeun Prim.

Visit: http://www.marioninstitute.org/blog/2011/03/children-bassac-us-tour-schedule

For a schedule of the group's upcoming performances.
For more infomation please contact info@cambodianlivingarts.org

Week of the Young Child

Apr 12, 2011
Pawel Loj, Creative Commons

This week has been designated The Week of the Young Child by the National association for the Education of Young Children, Joining us by phone is Maggie Adair, executive director of the Connecticut Early Childhood Alliance.

New Britain Busway

Apr 5, 2011

Governor Dannel Malloy has given his stamp of approval on construction of a New Britain to Hartford busway. The busway will travel along a 9.6 mile route of abandoned railroad bed, easing congestion on Interstate 84. Opponents and Supporters of the project met late last month with the Governor to offer their opinion on this controversial project.  One of those opponents is University of Connecticut Civil Engineering professor, Norman Garrick.

Pages