WNPR

Ray Hardman

Host/Reporter

Ray Hardman began his broadcasting career at WFSU in Tallahassee Florida where he served at different times as a producer, Operations manager, and Morning Edition host. Ray joined the WNPR staff in 1996, as a reporter and host. He later became the Music Director for WNPR, and in 2002 he went back to his newsy roots as the host of WNPR’s Morning Edition.

From 2002 to 2009 Ray divided his time between WNPR and CPTV, first serving as a correspondent on CPTV’s news magazine Main Street. He later became the host of Main Street, and from 2005 to 2009 was the host and producer for CPTV’s Front and Center with Ray Hardman.

Ray holds degrees from St. Mary's College of Maryland and Florida State University. In his spare time, Ray fronts a garage band called The Radiation. Ray lives in West Hartford with his wife Kathleen, and their sons Benjamin and Jackson. 

Ways to Connect

T. Charles Erickson / Hartford Stage

Hartford Stage's adaptation of "A Christmas Carol" has become a Connecticut tradition, thanks in part to actor Bill Raymond's portrayal of the character Scrooge. But after 17 years, Raymond has said he will step away from the role after this year. 

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Five students at the Yale School of Music have been awarded a start-up grant to develop a global, online platform for musicians to explore effective approaches to practicing.

Ray Hardman / WNPR

With the Donald Trump transition team announcing new cabinet picks on a nearly daily basis, Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal wants to make sure those nominees disclose their tax returns. 

Connecticut House Democrats

Longtime Democratic state lawmaker Betty Boukus has died at the age of 73.  The Plainville state representative recently lost her bid for a 12th term in the General Assembly.  

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The documentary "Flory's Flame" gets its Connecticut premiere this Saturday at the University of Hartford.

The film explores the life of composer and performer Flory Jagoda, who is credited with preserving the traditional Sephardic music of the Balkans, an art form that was nearly wiped away by the Nazis during World War II.

Office of Governor Dannel Malloy / Creative Commons

Clearing Connecticut highways of snow and ice will be quicker and  more efficient this winter, thanks to a fleet of innovative new snow plows. 

The new plow is towed in the rear of a plow truck, which swings out mechanically, essentially doubling the plowing capability of a regular plow to two full highway lanes in a single pass.

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Legendary comic strip artist Jerry Dumas died last week in Greenwich at the age of 86. Despite a two-year battle with cancer, Dumas continued to work on comic strips like "Beetle Bailey" until just recently.

mygueart/iStock / Thinkstock

A new report from Connecticut Voices for Children shows that school arrests have decreased significantly in Connecticut. But the decline wasn't nearly as steep for black and mixed race students.

WCN 24/7 / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Police Chiefs Association hopes an interactive presentation aimed at new drivers will make routine traffic stops go a lot smoother for both the driver and law enforcement. But members of Connecticut's Racial Profiling Prohibition Advisory Board object to one component of the presentation.

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South African classical guitarist Derek Gripper is obsessed with the lilting and intricate music of the West African instrument known as the kora. Gripper, who performs this Friday night at Wesleyan University, has translated many kora compositions for guitar.

This year, politicians and political action committees have spent millions of dollars connecting Republican candidates to Donald Trump, and Democrats to the policies of Governor Dannel Malloy.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

A Connecticut man is suing the Boy Scouts of America, claiming he was sexually abused by a Boy Scout leader in the 1990s.

The chair of the state Republican Party said a Democratic candidate has violated state election law by invoking the name and image of Donald Trump in a political ad.

Ray Hardman / WNPR

When the famous Austrian pianist Paul Wittgenstein lost his right arm in World War I, composers lined up to write works for the pianist featuring the left hand only. One of those works, Maurice Ravel's "Piano Concerto for the Left Hand," will be performed this Sunday by the West Hartford Symphony Orchestra. The soloist for that performance lost the use of his right hand in an unthinkable family tragedy.

Long Wharf Theater

Long Wharf Theater in New Haven is participating in a unique national collaboration that looks at the issue of police brutality and the Black Lives Matter Movement.

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