WNPR

Ray Hardman

Host/Reporter

Ray Hardman began his broadcasting career at WFSU in Tallahassee Florida where he served at different times as a producer, Operations manager, and Morning Edition host. Ray joined the WNPR staff in 1996, as a reporter and host. He later became the Music Director for WNPR, and in 2002 he went back to his newsy roots as the host of WNPR’s Morning Edition.

From 2002 to 2009 Ray divided his time between WNPR and CPTV, first serving as a correspondent on CPTV’s news magazine Main Street. He later became the host of Main Street, and from 2005 to 2009 was the host and producer for CPTV’s Front and Center with Ray Hardman.

Ray holds degrees from St. Mary's College of Maryland and Florida State University. In his spare time, Ray fronts a garage band called The Radiation. Ray lives in West Hartford with his wife Kathleen, and their sons Benjamin and Jackson. 

Ways to Connect

Chion Wolf / WNPR

For Connecticut's 1st District Congressman John Larson, the 115th Congress has gotten off to an inauspicious start.

Arc of Farmington Valley

One of the new laws that took effect on January 1 is a measure that switches out the decades-old handicap symbol with a new dynamic logo. 

Riccardo Ghilardi / Creative Commons

In 2008, the late Carrie Fisher spent a few weeks in Hartford, performing in her one-woman show "Wishful Drinking" at Hartford Stage. 

Connecticut is the third-healthiest state in the nation, according to a new report by United Health Foundation. But it wasn't all good news for the Nutmeg State. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Dunkin' Donuts Park is on track to be completed for the Hartford Yard Goats home opener April 13, according to the insurance company charged with finishing the minor league baseball stadium.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

As expected, all seven of Connecticut's presidential electors cast their ballots for Hillary Clinton for president and Tim Kaine for vice president in a ceremony at the state Capitol on Monday.

T. Charles Erickson / Hartford Stage

Hartford Stage's adaptation of "A Christmas Carol" has become a Connecticut tradition, thanks in part to actor Bill Raymond's portrayal of the character Scrooge. But after 17 years, Raymond has said he will step away from the role after this year. 

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Five students at the Yale School of Music have been awarded a start-up grant to develop a global, online platform for musicians to explore effective approaches to practicing.

Ray Hardman / WNPR

With the Donald Trump transition team announcing new cabinet picks on a nearly daily basis, Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal wants to make sure those nominees disclose their tax returns. 

Connecticut House Democrats

Longtime Democratic state lawmaker Betty Boukus has died at the age of 73.  The Plainville state representative recently lost her bid for a 12th term in the General Assembly.  

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The documentary "Flory's Flame" gets its Connecticut premiere this Saturday at the University of Hartford.

The film explores the life of composer and performer Flory Jagoda, who is credited with preserving the traditional Sephardic music of the Balkans, an art form that was nearly wiped away by the Nazis during World War II.

Office of Governor Dannel Malloy / Creative Commons

Clearing Connecticut highways of snow and ice will be quicker and  more efficient this winter, thanks to a fleet of innovative new snow plows. 

The new plow is towed in the rear of a plow truck, which swings out mechanically, essentially doubling the plowing capability of a regular plow to two full highway lanes in a single pass.

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Legendary comic strip artist Jerry Dumas died last week in Greenwich at the age of 86. Despite a two-year battle with cancer, Dumas continued to work on comic strips like "Beetle Bailey" until just recently.

mygueart/iStock / Thinkstock

A new report from Connecticut Voices for Children shows that school arrests have decreased significantly in Connecticut. But the decline wasn't nearly as steep for black and mixed race students.

WCN 24/7 / Creative Commons

The Connecticut Police Chiefs Association hopes an interactive presentation aimed at new drivers will make routine traffic stops go a lot smoother for both the driver and law enforcement. But members of Connecticut's Racial Profiling Prohibition Advisory Board object to one component of the presentation.

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