WNPR

Ray Hardman

Host/Reporter

Ray Hardman began his broadcasting career at WFSU in Tallahassee Florida where he served at different times as a producer, Operations manager, and Morning Edition host. Ray joined the WNPR staff in 1996, as a reporter and host. He later became the Music Director for WNPR, and in 2002 he went back to his newsy roots as the host of WNPR’s Morning Edition.

From 2002 to 2009 Ray divided his time between WNPR and CPTV, first serving as a correspondent on CPTV’s news magazine Main Street. He later became the host of Main Street, and from 2005 to 2009 was the host and producer for CPTV’s Front and Center with Ray Hardman.

Ray holds degrees from St. Mary's College of Maryland and Florida State University. In his spare time, Ray fronts a garage band called The Radiation. Ray lives in West Hartford with his wife Kathleen, and their sons Benjamin and Jackson. 

Ways to Connect

WCN 24/7 / Creative Commons

Connecticut's anti-racial profiling law requires police officers to record the details of every traffic stop they initiate -- things like the time of day the stop occurred, the reason for the stop, and the race of the stopped driver. 

Jonathan Lewis / Creative Commons

The Hartford Archdiocese has announced big changes for its churches. 

Yale University

Yale University is making the transition from Calhoun College to Grace Murray Hopper College. Although the name change won't be official until July 1, changes are underway at the residential college, including a plan to replace a number of stained glass windows to better reflect the legacy of Grace Hopper.

Dru Bloomfield / Creative Commons

Multiple coyote sightings in New London have put residents there on edge. They report coyotes following them on daytime walks with family pets and small children, showing no apparent fear of humans. 

Steve Lyon / Creative Commons

An audit by the Connecticut Racial Profiling Prohibition Project showed that the Hartford Police Department neglected to report thousands of traffic stops last year as was required by law.

Pages