WNPR

Patrick Skahill

Reporter

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011. 

He writes about science for The Beaker. 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He worked for two years as a print reporter at Stonebridge Press in Massachusetts where he covered crime and education and has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report. 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld and is a devoted fan of comedian Hannibal Burress.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

Shenanadoah National Park Service / Creative Commons

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is certain to change under the new administration of President Donald Trump, but just how much remains to be seen. 

Hartford has received a federal grant aimed at improving health outcomes for HIV/AIDS patients in the city.

dno1967b / Creative Commons

As natural gas gets diverted for home and other heating this winter, the head of New England's electricity grid is warning about possible future risks to the region's power.

Wikimedia Commons

Seventy-two years ago on January 27, the Nazi concentration camp at Auschwitz was liberated by Soviet troops. Now, "citizen historians" in Connecticut are examining how that and other events of the Holocaust were covered in local newspapers.

Rocpoc / Creative Commons

When you buy a container of soda, water, or beer, you pay five cents -- and if you return the bottle or can to be recycled, you get that money back. In Connecticut, the program is called “the bottle bill,” and it’s been around since 1980. But now, some are worried the whole system is on the verge of falling apart.

FuelCell Energy, Inc.

A fuel cell came online Monday in Connecticut, at Amity Regional High School in Woodbridge.

Wikimedia Commons

A Yale anthropologist and dozens of other researchers from around the world warn that about 60 percent of earth's primates are at risk of extinction. It's dire news for our closest biological relatives.

vpickering / Creative Commons

The term "epidemic" is often used to describe gun crimes in the United States, which got one Yale sociologist curious: just how contagious is it? And how does gun violence spread?

The National Drought Mitigation Center / USDA / David Miskus NOAA/NWS/NCEP/CPC

The U.S. Drought Monitor said that more precipitation, combined with low temperatures and minimal evaporation, have increased soil moisture. But the agency is still classifying drought in portions of central and northwest Connecticut as "extreme."

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The number of deaths from heroin and synthetic opioids continues to rise in New England, according to data just released by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

AllisonMatherly / Creative Commons

Lawmakers in Connecticut are identifying their environmental priorities for the upcoming legislative session, which kicks off Wednesday.

Neil Conway / Creative Commons

As U.S. Senator Jeff Sessions prepares to take command of the Department of Justice, more than two million Americans find themselves incarcerated in state or federal prisons or local jails. 

William Ouimet / CTECO (aerial imagery); USDA NRCS (LiDAR)

Earlier this fall, WNPR reported on charcoal mounds, hidden relics of the state's industrial past from back when iron was king and trees burned into charcoal to fuel furnaces. Now, scientists are using modern mapping technology to learn more about charcoal's legacy in Connecticut.

Wikimedia Commons

An environmental advocacy group claims hundreds of thousands of gallons of sewage flowed into rivers and streams in the state over several years, and it's blaming the city of Danbury.

United Congregational Church Bridgeport

A historic Christian church in Bridgeport will be reborn as a mosque following a $1 million purchase by the Bridgeport Islamic Community Center, or "BICC."

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