WNPR

Patrick Skahill

Reporter

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011. 

He writes about science for The Beaker. 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report. 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

Millstone Power Station

Governor Dannel Malloy signed a bill Tuesday that could change the way Connecticut's only nuclear power plant sells its energy.

Mamata.mulay / Creative Commons

State lawmakers have passed a bipartisan compromise budget bill. But the legislature's work on the bill may not be done yet. 

cogdogblog / Creative Commons

What goes in your recycling bin can be confusing. Now, the state is trying to clear up some confusion by putting out a new universal list. It’s part of a campaign called “What’s In. What’s Out.”

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Oily and smelly - Atlantic menhaden are one of the least sexy fish imaginable. But this humble fish, also called “bunker” or “pogie,” has deep roots off the coast of New England. 

Wikimedia Commons

What started as one scientist's hunch turned into a decade of research, which now claims a positive link between an invasive shrub called Japanese barberry and deer ticks.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Pine forests in New England could soon be at the mercy of an incredibly destructive insect. The southern pine beetle is making its way north. And a new study says climate change could speed up its migration.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Algunas universidades estatales y colegios universitarios comunitarios podrían pronto dar la bienvenida a los estudiantes desplazados por el Huracán María. Ahora el sistema del presidente ha propuesto ofrecer a esos estudiantes matrículas como si fuesen residentes del estado.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Los residentes se reunieron en una manifestación en el centro de Hartford, el miércoles, para llamar la atención sobre la actual crisis humanitaria en Puerto Rico. 

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Some state universities and community colleges could soon welcome students displaced by Hurricane Maria. Now the system’s president has proposed offering  those students in-state tuition rates.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Residents gathered at a rally in downtown Hartford Wednesday to call attention to the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico. 

Spotmatik/iStock / Thinkstock

Health insurance for thousands of children in Connecticut could soon disappear.

That’s because Congress failed to meet a September 30th deadline to renew funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Medical students are turning from the two-dimensional pages of their textbooks to the three-dimensional world of hand-held models. That’s because 3-D printing is changing the way doctors learn complex procedures, a development which could make medicine more personalized.

vichie81/iStock / Thinkstock

Talks continued Monday between health insurer Anthem and Hartford HealthCare hospitals.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Connecticut’s monarch butterflies are now making their annual migration thousands of miles south to Mexico. 

CT Senate Democrats / Creative Commons

A proposal to dramatically rework the state’s flagship environmental office is just one of many line-items packed into a complex Republican budget passed by the legislature last week.

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