WNPR

Patrick Skahill

Reporter

Patrick Skahill is a reporter at WNPR. He covers science with an emphasis on health care and the environment. Prior to becoming a reporter, he was the founding producer of WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show, which began in 2009 and won a PRNDI award in 2011. 

He writes about science for The Beaker. 

Patrick's reporting has appeared on NPR's Morning Edition, Here & Now, and All Things Considered. He worked for two years as a print reporter at Stonebridge Press in Massachusetts where he covered crime and education and has also reported for the Marketplace Morning Report. 

A graduate of Villanova University, Patrick holds a bachelor's degree in history with a concentration in Arab & Islamic Studies and a minor in Classical Studies. He holds a master's degree in Social Sciences from the University of Chicago. He knows way too much about Seinfeld.

He can be reached by phone at 860-275-7297 or by email: pskahill@wnpr.org.

Flickr Creative Commons, Jay Erickson

Three former prisoners at Niantic's York Correctional Institution are staging a play mixing Dante’s Inferno with real life prison stories. WNPR’s Patrick Skahill has more.

When Lynda Gardner was sent to jail for larceny in 2005, she didn't think she'd be reciting lines from Dante's Inferno.  She just thought she was in hell.

"I woke up in York and decided for the first six months I was going to kill myself," Gardner said. " I felt dead."

Patrick Skahill

So, what do you need to get into pigeon racing? Well, first - you have to have a lot of pigeons. In Bill Desmarais' case, 300 in his backyard. Then you tag the birds, load them onto a truck and ship them hundreds of miles away - where they get released all at once.

The bird that flies home fastest, wins.

Bill Desmaris explains, "We call it racing, they call it flying home."

Chion Wolf

Former Yale professor Dan Esty says he is growing into his new role as state environment and energy commissioner, despite a series of controversies over his prior ties to business. WNPR's Patrick Skahill has more.

For years, Dan Esty was a teacher. But as head of the DEEP, Esty says he's once again a student.

"I get that I'm in a different realm now. And I've got to learn to play in that domain and understand that the scrutiny that is there is much greater than I'm used to."

Photo / Chion Wolf, WNPR

There isn't too much Colin McEnroe Show producer Patrick Skahill won't do for his job, and this month that includes giving up meat, dairy and all manner of animal products for an upcoming show on veganism. Follow along as Patrick heats the tofurky and goes through hard-core donut withdrawl. Add your questions, cheers, and complaints in the comments section. 

September 8, 2011

Here's a tip - if you don't want to be the center of attention at your neice's first birthday, DON'T announce you've gone vegan.

Flickr Creative Commons, vixjohnson

"Street newspapers" are designed, written and sold by the homeless. They are small, usually no more than a few pages, and feature articles, photographs and poetry about what it's like to live in shelters or on the street. They're easy to find in cities like Portland, Oregon or Providence and as WNPR's Patrick Skahill reports, now Hartford has its own street newspaper.

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