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Michel Martin

Michel Martin is curious about many things. "I wonder what it's like to leave everything and everyone you know for the promise of a better life, to run for President, to be a professional athlete, to parent children of a different race," she notes. "I am fascinated by people who live lives different from my own. And at the same time, I feel connected to all of these lives being a journalist, a woman of color, a wife and mother."

As weekend host of All Things Considered, Martin draws on her deep reporting and interviewing experience to dig in to the week's news. Outside the studio, she is hosting "Michel Martin: Going There," an ambitious live event series in collaboration with Member Stations.

Martin came to NPR in 2006 and launched Tell Me More, a one-hour daily NPR news and talk show that aired on NPR stations nationwide from 2007-2014 and dipped into thousands of important conversations taking place in the corridors of power, but also in houses of worship, and barber shops and beauty shops, at PTA meetings, town halls, and at the kitchen table.

She has spent more than 25 years as a journalist — first in print with major newspapers and then in television. Tell Me More marked her debut as a full-time public radio show host. "What makes public radio special is that it's got both intimacy and reach all at once. For the cost of a phone call, I can take you around the world. But I'm right there with you in your car, in your living room or kitchen or office, in your iPod. Radio itself is an incredible tool and when you combine that with the global resources of NPR plus the commitment to quality, responsibility and civility, it's an unbeatable combination."

Martin has also served as contributor and substitute host for NPR newsmagazines and talk shows, including Talk of the Nation and News & Notes.

Martin joined NPR from ABC News, where she worked since 1992. She served as correspondent for Nightline from 1996 to 2006, reporting on such subjects as the congressional budget battles, the U.S. embassy bombings in Africa, racial profiling and the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. At ABC, she also contributed to numerous programs and specials, including the network's award-winning coverage of September 11, a documentary on the Anita Hill-Clarence Thomas controversy, a critically acclaimed AIDS special and reports for the ongoing series "America in Black and White." Martin reported for the ABC newsmagazine Day One, winning an Emmy for her coverage of the international campaign to ban the use of landmines, and was a regular panelist on This Week with George Stephanopoulos. She also hosted the 13-episode series Life 360, an innovative program partnership between Oregon Public Broadcasting and Nightline incorporating documentary film, performance and personal narrative; it aired on public television stations across the country.

Before joining ABC, Martin covered state and local politics for the Washington Post and national politics and policy at the Wall Street Journal, where she was White House correspondent. She has also been a regular panelist on the PBS series Washington Week and a contributor to NOW with Bill Moyers.

Martin has been honored by numerous organizations, including the Candace Award for Communications from The National Coalition of 100 Black Women, the Joan Barone Award for Excellence in Washington-based National Affairs/Public Policy Broadcasting from the Radio and Television Correspondents' Association and a 2002 Silver Gavel Award, given by the American Bar Association. Along with her Emmy award, she received three additional Emmy nominations, including one with WNYC's Robert Krulwich, at the time an ABC contributor as well, for an ABC News program examining children's racial attitudes.

A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Martin graduated cum laude from Radcliffe College at Harvard University in 1980 and earned a Master of Arts from the Wesley Theological Seminary in 2016.

Copyright 2016 KQED Public Media. To see more, visit KQED Public Media . MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: We have a report now from Oakland, Calif., where firefighters and other first responders are continuing to search through the scene of a devastating fire there Friday night. So far, the remains of at least 33 people have been recovered, seven of those have been identified. Member station KQED's Sandhya Dirks is at the scene in Oakland. Sandhya, thanks so much for speaking with us. SANDHYA DIRKS,...

Copyright 2016 American Homefront Project. To see more, visit American Homefront Project . MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: There is still one race from last month's election that has yet to be decided - the governor of North Carolina. The incumbent, Republican Pat McCrory, trails his Democratic challenger, Roy Cooper, by 10,000 votes. But McCrory has refused to concede. This weekend, there is going to be a recount in one of the state's biggest counties. We're joined now by Jeff Tiberii of member station...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Now we'd like to take a minute to consider how Castro influenced the country in one particular way - its music. To do that, we're joined by NPR contributor Betto Arcos. Betto, thanks so much for joining us. BETTO ARCOS, BYLINE: My pleasure to be with you, Michel. MARTIN: So let's get to the late '60s and early '70s after Castro had been in power not for very long. What did the music sound like then? What was...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Finally, today, I want to thank Linda Wertheimer for filling in for me yesterday so I could attend funeral services for my friend, the PBS journalist Gwen Ifill, who died on Monday at the age of 61. Even now, almost a week later, it's hard to believe she's gone. And she's been a part of most of the significant personal and professional events of my life. We first met when we both covered the Maryland state...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Finally, if you've been listening this weekend, then you know we turned over yesterday's entire hour to reflections from people with whom we've been speaking over the course of the election year. This included people who identify as Republican and Democrat and neither, people who supported Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton or neither. We wanted to hear what they had to say about the election and what they see going...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: More on international reaction now. Over the past several years, U.S.-Russia relations have deteriorated. But President-elect Trump and President Vladimir Putin say they are hoping to forge stronger ties. And that worries some of Russia's neighbors. Baltic states Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia are all NATO members, and they are nervous about Trump's criticisms of NATO, especially as Russia seeks to weaken that...

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Now to a major event in Washington, D.C., today - the opening of the National Museum of African American History and Culture. It opened today on the National Mall. President Obama was just one of the thousands of people who attended the grand opening ceremony. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) BARACK OBAMA: ...That African-American history is not somehow separate from our larger American story. It's not the...

Copyright 2016 Minnesota Public Radio. To see more, visit Minnesota Public Radio .

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: An earthquake rattled northern Oklahoma early Saturday morning with a magnitude 5.6, one of the strongest in the state's history. So far no fatalities have been reported, but people felt the quake as far away as St. Louis, Mo., Dallas, Texas, and even Memphis, Tenn. Now, Oklahoma has experienced a number of earthquakes this year, some of which have been linked to the underground disposal of wastewater from oil...

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. MICHEL MARTIN, HOST: Finally, today, we'd like to mark the 53rd anniversary of a March on Washington. On this date in 1963, a crowd of at least 250,000 people gathered on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., to hear what would become one of the best known and, for many, one of the best loved speeches in American history. (SOUNDBITE OF ARCHIVED RECORDING) MARTIN LUTHER KING JR: I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up,...

It's still summer and school's still out for most people, so it's understandable if you're not thinking about the flu. But we all will be soon. Your pharmacist, your doctor, your boss, maybe even your colleagues — they'll all be pushing you to get that annual flu shot, as well they should. Flu is serious business; it causes thousands of hospitalizations each year. There is no exact number of how many people die from the flu every year. It comes in different strains, and people don't always...

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LIVE AT 8 PM EASTERN: In 1966, Martin Luther King Jr. traveled to Chicago with a mission to expand the Civil Rights Movement from the South to the North. King led what became known as the Chicago Freedom Movement, focusing on racial discrimination in housing as well as discriminatory practices by employers. Fifty years later, does King's work still impact the communities he worked to protect and create a better future for? I'm in Chicago, leading a discussion that reflects on King's time in...

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