Lydia Brown

Producer

Lydia Brown is a producer for the daily WNPR news-talk show, Where We Live, hosted by John Dankosky.  

Before she became a producer, Lydia interned for WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show and Where We Live. She also contributed to Entrepreneur.com and reviewed concerts for Bachtrack.  

Lydia holds a B.A. in Journalism and a B.A. in Music from New York University.

Todd Mundt / Creative Commons

Access Health CT CEO Kevin Counihan is leaving Connecticut to join John Dankosky in Washington, DC. Actually, Counihan will be the CEO of HealthCare.gov and Dankosky will be back tomorrow.

The recent death of actor Robin Williams left many people shocked, and it re-started the conversation about suicide, its warning signs, and ways to get help. We revisit a show we did about the illness last year.

We also hear a moving story about depression from author Andrew Solomon, who shared it at The Connecticut Forum earlier this year.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Radio has a very long and storied history, and is influenced by -- some might say ruled by -- some long-held, traditional practices.

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Research shows that using your vacation time can have some major benefits. For one, it’s better for productivity, and -- as one study shows -- it can even be better for your health. But are Americans taking enough time off, or are we really a "no-vacation nation"? 

Neil Conway / Creative Commons

A recent poll from the the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Harvard School of Public Health found that poverty leads to stress, affecting people’s ways of thinking and their overall health. In our region, researchers and doctors have found that living in poverty can actually hinder brain development.

This hour, we learn more about the psychology of poverty and find out what’s being done to combat some of the the stresses it brings on. We also talk to one researcher who has been looking at the impact of noise pollution on the brain development of children in low-income communities.

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With all eyes on Ferguson, Missouri, many people are also taking a step back to look at their own communities. What many of us see is a problem not restricted to Ferguson. Earlier this week, we had a conversation about urban policing and the militarization of police forces. 

Chion Wolf

We continue our Where We Vote series with third party candidate for governor, Joe Visconti. He’s confident that he collected enough signatures to make it onto the November ballot - and many of those signatures came from a key demographic for him: gun owners. We’ll be joined in-studio by Visconti to talk about his candidacy and where he stands on the issues.

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The fatal shooting of 18-year-old Michael Brown sent hundreds of angry protesters into the streets of Ferguson, Missouri last week. There, chaos erupted as police and demonstrators clashed amid smoke bombs and stun grenades. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In her first book The End of the Suburbs: Where the American Dream is Moving, author Leigh Gallagher observes a growing trend in America’s housing landscape: fewer people are choosing to live in suburbs. This hour, Leigh joins us to explain some of the forces driving Americans out of suburbia, and give us a glimpse of what the post-cul-de-sac future might look like.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

According to new data from Connecticut’s health insurance exchange, Access Health CT, the state’s uninsured rate has dropped by roughly 50 percent since 2012 This decrease is due, in part, to the more than 256,000 residents who’ve signed up for health insurance and Medicaid since Access Health CT’s exchange website was launched last fall. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Maybe "Primary-Palooza" is an exaggeration, since voter turnout is abysmal, at best, in some towns. Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse recaps the results of votes cast. 

Were you one of the few, the proud, the voters? Did you join the masses of non-voters? We'd love to hear your Primary Day stories on The Wheelhouse.

Tucker Ives / WNPR

As the country looks back on the 40th anniversary of the Watergate scandal, we’ll revisit a conversation with former Nixon White House Counsel John Dean. He was credited with cooperating with investigators, and linking President Nixon to the Watergate scandal. He was also called, by the FBI, the “master manipulator of the cover up.”

Tucker Ives / WNPR

You’ve probably received a “legislative report” from your elected representatives. These mailers tout their accomplishments and some criticize political opponents. But they’re not paid for with campaign money. This “constituent outreach” is paid for with public dollars. We’ll look at the history of this practice called “franking” at the state and federal level.

Vuilnis bij Essent Milieu / Wikimedia Commons

Ever wonder what happens to all the stuff you throw away?

Chances are, you've watched it get hurled into the back of a garbage or recycling truck. But what happens after it leaves the curb? Well, the story of trash is a lot more fascinating and complex than you probably think. 

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For 50 years, the White Memorial Conservation Center in Litchfield has provided a hands-on look at the natural diversity of northwestern Connecticut. With workshops, educational programs -- even its own Nature Museum -- the center has been teaching visitors about the various species and habitats found on the surrounding land. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

We’re less than a week away from the Republican primary and the airwaves are filling up with more and more ads. But turnout is expected to be very low. Today is also the deadline for third party candidates Joe Visconti and Jonathan Pelto to submit their petitions to get on the November ballot.

Neil Conway / Creative Commons

After spending years, sometimes decades behind bars, inmates leave prison with little direction for moving forward. They face difficulties obtaining employment, education, and housing. Although Connecticut is a national leader on re-entry programs, a recent study finds nearly 80 percent of inmates released in 2005 were re-arrested within five years.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A new “bill of rights” has gone into effect for Connecticut’s electricity consumers. The bill is aimed at creating greater transparency in the marketing practices of third-party electric suppliers -- after many consumers complained that their electricity bills were increasing without warning.

Chion Wolff.

Mario Pavone and Jimmy Greene are both veterans of Connecticut's jazz scene -- having grown up here, decades apart -- and both deciding to make the state their home.

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It’s an hour for the birds! We are joined by bird lovers and experts to discuss the state of the bird population in our state and to answer your burning bird questions. We also check in with our environmental reporter Patrick Skahill about his recent bird-related reporting.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut is generally a “blue” state, but the latest New York Times/CBS poll paints it a different color in the race for governor. But the poll itself was a different color too. On our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we’ll discuss the divided state of Connecticut with our team of reporters and analysts, including Bill Curry who says his Democratic party has lost its soul.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Restraint and seclusion is a legal, albeit controversial, practice in our nation's public schools. Students -- often those with disabilities -- can be restrained and secluded against their will. This can result, and has resulted on many occasions, in injury to the student. Nationwide, there are 20 known cases of death because of restraint or seclusion in the past two decades.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The 2012 race for Connecticut’s Fifth Congressional District seat was filled with campaign-related shenanigans. The person who came out on top was Elizabeth Esty.

She’s running for re-election this year in the “Fightin’ Fifth,” and she joins us for our Where We Vote series to talk politics, foreign relations, immigration, and more.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

New Jersey Governor Chris Christie is making headlines once again.

Just a few weeks ago, he vetoed a bill that would have restricted the size of gun magazines from 15 rounds to 10. The decision angered a number of gun control advocates, including some Sandy Hook parents.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The recent FUSE scandal has raised questions about charter school oversight. Is this type of problem representative of the overall charter school system? We take a look at just how effective these schools are and how much oversight they have. We're joined by experts and we want to hear from you, especially if you have experience in the charter school system.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy takes a strong stance on housing immigrant children in this state. We’ll talk about this story and more on our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse. Also, the Hartford Courant’s Dan Haar has been walking and reporting from Connecticut’s Rt. 44. He’ll take a load off to share some tales from the road. Chubby Checker (yes, that Chubby Checker) is also coming to town for a political fundraiser.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Radio has a very long and storied history, and is influenced by -- some might say ruled by -- some long-held, traditional practices.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Amy Goodman’s radio, TV, and Web program Democracy Now! has a wide following among people who think the mainstream media doesn’t let us hear enough voices from those who protest against powerful interests. This week, she visits the Mark Twain House and Museum to discuss her new book The Silenced Majority: Stories of Uprisings, Occupations, Resistance and Hope.

This hour, we preview that event, with a conversation about the state of the news media today. We also listen back to a conversation with a Hartford-based guitarist who celebrates the music of her home country, Puerto Rico, while also exploring the classical repertoire.

Horia Varlan / Creative Commons

Back in March, a team of Harvard scientists claimed to have found the first direct evidence of gravity waves from the Big Bang. Within a matter of hours, their story had made its way around the Internet, spreading across blogs, news sites, and social media.

Catie Talarski

There are currently some 57 turtle species living in the United States and Canada, 12 of which can be found right here in Connecticut -- including some sea turtles!

Chances are, you’ve probably seen a few of them poking around a nearby pond or basking on some sunlit rocks. Perhaps you’ve even rescued a few from the peril of oncoming traffic.

But there’s a lot more to these terrestrial critters than meets the eye.

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