WNPR

Lydia Brown

Senior Producer

Lydia Brown is senior producer of the daily WNPR news-talk show, Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil.  

Before she became a producer, Lydia interned for WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show and Where We Live

She holds a B.A. in Journalism and Music from New York University.

Ways to Connect

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Brian Dunnigan is a web designer and co-founder of the Hawthorn Watch Co. in Vernon, Connecticut.

Coming up, we discuss the inspiration behind his business and talk about Connecticut’s role in manufacturing the hands of time.

But first: mastering the skills of traditional craftsmen.

We hear how an exhibit at the Connecticut Historical Society celebrates the bond between artists and their apprentices.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When we hear the words “autism diagnosis” it’s common to imagine a young child or adolescent.

But what about those who receive their diagnoses at a later stage of life -- in the midst of successful careers or long, happy marriages?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: following reports of abuse by staff at Connecticut’s maximum-security psychiatric unit -- news of an order separating Whiting Forensic from Connecticut Valley Hospital. 

Coming up, we discuss the significance of the split -- including what it means for the safety and oversight of patients.

Vladimir Pustovit / Creative Commons

There are many questions a young woman will face as she matures. Among them: What is her timeline for building a family? And how many kids does she expect to have?

But not all women want to become mothers. 

Jason D. Neely

This hour: the origin of the Connecticut Valley Railroad. Author and historian Max R. Miller takes “along the valley line” -- sharing stories from the railroad’s past.

But first: on the heels of last month’s devastating Amtrak derailment in Washington state -- a look at what lies ahead for the nation’s aging transportation infrastructure

Justin Brockie / Creative Commons

Across New England, freezing temps and blizzard conditions marked an unforgiving start to 2018.

This hour, we consider the factors underlying this extreme winter weather -- including the role of global climate change. 

Lisa McHale

This hour: the National Football League.

Just hearing those words once beckoned vivid mental images -- scenes of athletes entertaining millions with their heroic throws and jaw-clenching tackles.

In recent years, however, the NFL's image has darkened -- clouded by concerns surrounding athlete behavior and a brain disease known as CTE. 

Fort George G. Meade Public Affairs Office Follow / Creative Commons

Make room, troops. Recently, the Boy Scouts of America unveiled a major decision -- starting this year, the organization will begin admitting girls. Yes, that’s right. Girls.

While the news has been met with applause by some, others have expressed more critical views -- including the Girl Scouts. This hour, we find out why. 

PBS

For nearly four and a half decades, Sonia Manzano was Maria -- a recurring female lead on the PBS television series "Sesame Street."

Last year, Manzano retired from the show and published a memoir. It’s called Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Long Island Sound has a new guardian of sorts. Earlier this year, biologist Bill Lucey was named soundkeeper of the Northeast estuary.

This hour, the Connecticut native stops by our studios.

We learn more about his role and talk about efforts to improve life in and around the Sound.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: the myths and realities of end-of-life treatment in the U.S.

Coming up, we learn about a recent Kaiser Health News investigation and explore the history of hospice in Connecticut.

Do you know someone who has received or is currently undergoing hospice care? How has that experience affected you, your friends, your family? 

arinahabich/iStock / Thinkstock

It’s the holiday season -- the perfect time to kick back and get lost in a new podcast... or two... or three... or four. But how do you decide what to listen to?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When we hear the words “autism diagnosis” it’s common to imagine a young child or adolescent.

But what about those who receive their diagnoses at a later stage of life -- in the midst of successful careers or long, happy marriages?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Ten months after the tragic death of Hartford teenager Matthew Tirado -- a look at what’s being done to safeguard the lives of children with disabilities.

Coming up, we hear about a recent Office of the Child Advocate investigation into the case of 17-year-old Tirado.

The report recommends improvements that apply to school districts statewide. 

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