Lydia Brown

Senior Producer

Lydia Brown is Senior Producer of the daily WNPR news-talk show, Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil.  

Before she became a producer, Lydia interned for WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show and Where We Live

She holds a B.A. in Journalism and Music from New York University.

Ways to Connect

DC Central Kitchen / Creative Commons

They say it's important to eat breakfast every day. But what if you eat two breakfasts?

According to a new study, students who eat two breakfasts -- one at home and one at school -- are less likely to experience unhealthy weight gain than students who skip the meal altogether

Andrew Ciscel / Creative Commons

What if commuting between Connecticut and Long Island meant hopping into a car and driving through a tunnel deep below Long Island Sound? Sounds far-fetched, right?

Well, if you're New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, you might not think so. And if you're Amtrak, you might think it shouldn't be cars driving under the Sound, but trains connecting the Northeast Corridor

Mic445 / Creative Commons

Barbara Bradley Hagerty is an award-winning journalist and former NPR correspondent. She's also the author of Life Reimagined, a new book aimed at helping readers navigate the trials and opportunities of midlife.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Iason Athanasiadis is a writer, photojournalist, and documentary filmmaker who has spent years covering the Middle East and Mediterranean Europe. He was in Hartford recently to speak to the World Affairs Council of Connecticut, and stopped by our studios to talk about journalism in conflict regions and the Syrian migrant crisis. This hour, we listen back to that conversation.

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This hour, we feature stories and sounds from the West African country of Nigeria. 

First, WSHU reporter Ebong Udoma checks in from Abuja, Nigeria, where he's helped launch a brand new multimedia project called Gotel Africa. When completed, Gotel Africa will become the continent's first-ever pan-African news service. We learn more about it. 

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This hour, our news roundtable The Wheelhouse tackles some of the biggest political stories of the week. We discuss everything from state budget cuts, to automatic voter registration, to a "legislative mystery" that's got everyone asking: Who added language to the SEEC's bill? 

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This hour -- from Maine to New Hampshire; Vermont to Massachusetts -- we learn how some of our New England neighbors are working to stem opioid addiction and overdose. 

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Few of us remember Hurricane Ike as vividly as we remember Katrina and Sandy. But for people down in Houston, Texas, the 2008 storm was a major wake-up call. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When a woman addicted to opioids gives birth, she usually leaves her baby behind to be cared for by nurses. However, one Connecticut hospital is rethinking that approach. This hour, we find out why with WNPR reporter Jeff Cohen. 

John Haley / Connecticut Historical Society

This hour, a panel of experts and historians gives us an in-depth look at the life and legacy of Beatrice Fox Auerbach, owner and CEO of Connecticut's most beloved department store, G. Fox and Co. 

Tom / Creative Commons

This hour -- from the outbreak of Zika virus to the spread of Lyme disease -- doctors and epidemiologists take our questions on some of the biggest public health stories to hit the news. We find out what we know, what we don’t know, and what the real risks are to Connecticut. 

Mike Steele / Creative Commons

In The Slave's Cause, author and scholar Manisha Sinha writes a new history of abolition -- a history more complex than the one taught in most American classrooms. This hour, Sinha takes us inside her book for a look at abolition's lesser known past.  

Stephen Voss / NPR

In 2013, the unexpected departure of NPR CEO Gary Knell left the network, once again, in desperate need of a leader. So the board tapped Jarl Mohn -- a long-time philanthropist and media executive -- to step in and take the reins.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, Kristina Newman-Scott sits down with us for the first time since becoming Connecticut's director of culture in 2015. We find out how things are going in her new position, and take your questions about local arts and culture. 

This hour -- from Holocaust survivor to iconic twentieth-century inventor -- we hear about the life and career of Hartford's own H. Joseph Gerber. His story is chronicled in the new biography, The Inventor's Dilemma.

Also, urbanist Richard Florida gives us his take on GE's move from Fairfield to Boston

Feryal Salem

The 2016 presidential race has been loaded with rhetoric about a so-called “ISIS caliphate." But what exactly is a caliphate? And what does it mean to say that ISIS has one? This hour, local Islamic scholar Dr. Feryal Salem fills us in. 

Museokeskus Vapriikki / Creative Commons

This hour, New Yorker editor David Remnick takes us for a behind-the-scenes look at his new radio show and podcast The New Yorker Radio Hour

We also chat with some of the creators of WNPR's new Radius Project. They're mapping Hartford in a new way -- we find out how. 

Beth Cortez-Neavel / Creative Commons

When was the last time you sent a letter? Not an email, but a real, tangible piece of mail? If your answer is "not recently," you’re not alone.

Except for the occasional birthday or holiday card, most of us haven’t sent -- or received -- good, old-fashioned snail mail in a very long time. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

For his latest book, Michael Robinson journeyed to the mountains of East Africa with a particular mission in mind: to search for explorer Henry Morton Stanley's so-called "white tribe." This hour, Robinson talks about his experience, and how it helped inform The Lost White Tribe: Explorers, Scientists, and the Theory that Changed a Continent

Keoni Cabral / Creative Commons

The Michigan Civil Rights Commission announced it will hold hearings to see whether discrimination played a role in the handling of Flint’s water crisis. The decision came early last week, amid allegations of environmental racism against the city’s largely black community.

This hour -- from Flint, Michigan to New Haven, Connecticut -- we learn about the environmental justice issues affecting America's low-income communities of color. 

Rick / Flickr Creative Commons

Did you know that roughly one-third of the food we produce each year is either lost or wasted? This hour, Food Foolish co-author John Mandyck tells us how reducing global food waste could help mitigate the stresses of hunger, water shortages, and climate change. 

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Sanctuary cities have become a focus in the national debate on immigration reform. But what are they? Where are they? And how do they affect communities around the country? 

Horia Varlan / Flickr Creative Commons

Here's a riddle for you: What's green and yellow, but most often red?

Give up? It's a traffic light -- you know, those things you hit on your way into the office each morning. But how do they work? And why don't they ever seem to be synced up? 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Wise Old Moon is a Hartford-based Americana band, made up of members Connor Millican, Dan Liparini, Stephen Cusano, and Sean Rubin. This hour, the quartet drops by CPBN's Chase Family Studio to showcase some music off their latest album, Don't Take Off

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When you think of drought, what place comes to mind? California? Texas? How about... Connecticut?

According to the United States Drought Monitor, more than 90 percent of our state is in a moderate drought right now -- and we’re not the only ones in the Northeast experiencing unusually dry conditions.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A new report on Connecticut's civic health was released Tuesday. This hour, we discuss its findings with Secretary of the State Denise Merrill. 

vxla / Creative Commons

Last week, Puerto Rico defaulted on millions of dollars in debt payments, spurring legal action from bond insurers. This hour, we get the latest on the island's economic crisis, including Governor Alejandro García Padilla’s pleas for Congressional intervention

Nick M / Creative Commons

This hour, we feature stories and sounds from the West African country of Nigeria. 

First, WSHU reporter Ebong Udoma checks in from Abuja, Nigeria, where he's helped launch a brand new multimedia project called Gotel Africa. When completed, Gotel Africa will become the continent's first-ever pan-African news service. We learn more about it. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's been one week since Luke Bronin was sworn in as Hartford's 67th mayor. This hour, he stops by to discuss his plans for the city. We talk about ballparks and city budgets; schools and salary increases. And we take your questions, too. What do you want to ask the mayor?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

In December, Connecticut regulators approved the $3 billion merger of Spanish firm Iberdrola and New Haven-based UIL Holdings. The news came just two weeks after the Public Utilities Regulatory Authority issued a draft decision OK-ing the deal. 

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