Lydia Brown

Senior Producer

Lydia Brown is Senior Producer of the daily WNPR news-talk show, Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil.  

Before she became a producer, Lydia interned for WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show and Where We Live

She holds a B.A. in Journalism and Music from New York University.

Ways to Connect

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut is home to many historic landmarks -- among them is the former residence of American architect and icon Philip Johnson. Since it opened to the public in 2007, Johnson's Glass House has welcomed thousands of visitors from across the country and around the world. 

Ken and Nyetta / Creative Commons

This hour, we look at the impact of climate change on New England's native plant and animal species. We talk with scientists and science journalists, and we hear from you. Have you noticed anything different about the flora and fauna in your backyard? And what can historical records -- like the observations of naturalist Henry David Thoreau -- teach us about our changing environment? 

State of Connecticut

This hour, we sit down for a special one-on-one conversation with Connecticut Department of Motor Vehicles Commissioner Michael Bzdyra. It's been a long, rough year for the DMV. We discuss efforts to improve the agency and take your comments and questions for the commissioner. Have you visited your local DMV branch recently? What was your experience like? 

Loren Kerns / Creative Commons

There are many ways to experience the American landscape -- you can bike it, drive it, fly over it... even take trains across it. But there’s nothing quite as intimate or liberating as the experience you get while walking it. 

Paul Sableman / Creative Commons

This hour, community leaders, activists, and law enforcement officers discuss the recent string of deadly shootings in Baton Rouge, Minnesota, and Dallas. We consider what's driving these horrific acts of violence. Is it racism? Our nation's gun culture? Something else entirely? And how do you talk to your kids about all of this?

Mary Anne Williams

Your home is one of your biggest investments, but some Connecticut residents are seeing that investment crumble because of failing foundations. This hour, we find out what the state is doing to help those whose homes and futures are -- quite literally -- falling apart beneath them. 

Erik (HASH) Hersman / Creative Commons

The Republican and Democratic National Conventions are just around the corner. The presumptive nominees? Two of the most unpopular presidential candidates in recent history: Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Most of us know the Miranda rights -- our "right to remain silent" -- even if we've never been arrested. But do you know the full history behind them? This hour, we talk to a local public defender about the 50th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision Miranda v. Arizona.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Minor League Baseball’s Eastern League has its All-Star Game in two weeks. Fortunately, that game wasn’t scheduled to be held in Hartford where the Yard Goats baseball stadium is still not completed. 

Daniel Orth / Creative Commons

Michigan is not the only state with a water crisis on its hands. Right now, communities in New York, New Hampshire, and Vermont are grappling with their own water contamination challenges. It’s just that for these states, the problem does not stem from corrosive water or aging lead pipes, but from a toxic chemical known as PFOA. 

Office of Gov. Dannel Malloy

Controversy is growing around state Insurance Commissioner Katharine Wade. She's in charge of reviewing a $54 billion health insurance merger between Anthem and Cigna, but she's also a former employee of one of the companies in question. Should she recuse herself from the case? And what has been the role in all this of Governor Dannel Malloy, who appointed Wade last year? This hour, we take a closer look with a panel of local and national reporters. 

ngkaki/iStock / Thinkstock

Advocates say recent budget cuts will have a negative impact on those seeking mental health services in Connecticut. The state's new $19.7 billion budget -- passed by lawmakers last month -- includes significant funding cuts for statewide mental health and substance abuse treatment programs. 

Martin Garrido / Flickr Creative Commons

America's Asian population is growing faster than any other racial group in the country. According to the White House, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders will account for nearly ten percent of all U.S. residents by the year 2050. So why, then, don’t we hear more about them in our communities? 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A new law aimed at combating Connecticut’s opioid and heroin epidemic will go into effect on July 1, 2016. The legislation, Public Act 16-43, has been described as one of the most comprehensive opioid laws in the country and includes several key provisions -- among them: a seven-day limit on all first-time, non-chronic pain opioid prescriptions. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Most of us know the Miranda rights -- our "right to remain silent" -- even if we've never been arrested. But do you know the full history behind them? This hour, we talk to a local public defender about the 50th anniversary of the landmark Supreme Court decision Miranda v. Arizona.

Jeff Kern / Creative Commons

The country grapples with the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history after a massacre at a gay nightclub in Orlando, Florida early Sunday morning left 50 people dead and wounded another 53. This tragedy brings together several big issues of the last few years: guns, gay rights, and terrorism.

Loren Kerns / Creative Commons

There are many ways to experience the American landscape -- you can bike it, drive it, fly over it... even take trains across it. But there’s nothing quite as intimate or liberating as the experience you get while walking it. 

oliver.dodd / Creative Commons

An antibiotic-resistant "superbug" gene was discovered in the United States recently, triggering a media frenzy. Across the world, newspaper and television headlines warned of "nightmare bacteria," "deadly" infections, and a looming "global health crisis." But was the response warranted? 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The State of Connecticut operates a Veterans’ Home on 92 acres in Rocky Hill. Many of its residents were once homeless or in danger of homelessness. But a lot of the buildings are outdated and in need of major improvements.

This hour, we find out what a recent consultant's report says about ways the state can better use the property to serve veterans. 

Crystal Emery

This hour, New Haven-based filmmaker Crystal Emery takes us behind the scenes of her new documentary  "Black Women in Medicine." We meet some of the women profiled in her film, and discuss recent efforts to increase diversity in the science and medical fields. 

Andrew Love / Creative Commons

Are you feeling overburdened by student loan payments or the growing stack of credit card bills on your kitchen table? If you answered "yes" to either of those questions, you're not alone (especially if you're a young American).

Thomas Hawk / WNPR

A new report commissioned by two Connecticut organizations looks at the challenges children face when their parents are in prison. This hour, we check in with one of those groups -- the Connecticut Association for Human Services -- to see what they found and how they plan on using the results to guide future policy conversations. We also hear from a college student whose father spent nearly a decade behind bars.

Waterbury Public Schools

Jahana Hayes is a history teacher at John F. Kennedy High School in Waterbury, Connecticut. She's also the 2016 National Teacher of the Year. This hour, she stops by to talk about her career, her new national title, and her recent visit to the White House

fruity monkey / Creative Commons

Paid leave has been a hot-button issue on the campaign trail and in the Connecticut legislature. Earlier this year, state lawmakers considered a bill that would have established mandatory paid family and medical leave for private employees. That bill, however, died in the Senate. 

Martin Garrido / Creative Commons

America's Asian population is growing faster than any other racial group in the country. According to the White House, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders will account for nearly ten percent of all U.S. residents by the year 2050. So why, then, don’t we hear more about them in our communities? 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's John Dankosky's final episode before Lucy Nalpathanchil takes over as the new host of Where We Live. This hour, we remember some of our favorite moments -- and mishaps -- on the show. We also meet a longtime listener and caller, whose voice will probably sound very familiar to you... it's Derrick from Windsor, Connecticut! 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Where We Live is much more than a show about place, it's a show about people -- about you, our listeners. Your stories, comments, and questions have meant so much to us over the past ten years, which is why we’re using this hour to get your feedback. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Kate Callahan has been a fixture of the Connecticut music scene for years -- and now she's got a title to prove it. Earlier this year the singer-songwriter was named Connecticut’s 16th State Troubadour

Andrew Love / Creative Commons

Are you feeling overburdened by student loan payments or the growing stack of credit card bills on your kitchen table? If you answered "yes" to either of those questions, you're not alone (especially if you're a young American).

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Consumer advocate Ralph Nader spent the better part of two decades dreaming up a museum with a highly specific, slightly bizarre theme: tort law. In late 2015, that dream became a reality with the opening of the American Museum of Tort Law in downtown Winsted, Connecticut.

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