WNPR

Lydia Brown

Senior Producer

Lydia Brown is senior producer of the daily WNPR news-talk show, Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil.  

Before she became a producer, Lydia interned for WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show and Where We Live

She holds a B.A. in Journalism and Music from New York University.

Ways to Connect

Mamma Loves / Creative Commons

Pregnancy and childbirth bring on a range of emotions -- from excitement, to exhaustion, to the stress of physical pain.

Few, however, expect these experiences to result in human tragedy -- especially not in the death of a new or soon-to-be mother

This hour: the realities of maternal health and mortality. We check in with a team of doctors and reporters, and we also hear from you.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Coming up: We find out how researchers are working to preserve the world's most endangered languages -- including a look at locally-based efforts to expand fluency of the Mohegan language.

But first: reaction to the weekend’s news out of Charlottesville.

We check in with former Virginia residents and we also hear from you.

How do you interpret this latest incident of racism and violence? Do you worry that something similar could happen here in Connecticut? 

Alice Collins Plebuch

Unearthing family history -- one saliva sample at a time.

This hour: how low-cost DNA testing helped spawn an industry and, with it, a new wave of genealogical sleuthing.

Ancestry.com, 23andMe, Family Tree DNA -- how far are you willing to go and how much are you willing to spend to better understand your roots? 

Yale University

Here's something that might make you might think twice before ordering a bucket of drumsticks: tasty as they may be, those cooked morsels of meat actually come from... dinosaurs.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Coming up, we find out how New Haven's new Elm City Party Bike is motivating some to pedal for their beer.

But first, members of the Hartford-based, '90s-inspired rock band Audio Jane join us live in WNPR’s Studio 3.

We talk about their local roots and listen to songs off their 2017 release -- an album called Naive

Maisa Tisdale

Within the shadow of P.T. Barnum lies a much quieter tale of Bridgeport prosperity -- a tale involving two nineteenth-century sisters, Mary and Eliza Freeman.

While neither achieved the same level of recognition as Barnum, both established a significant place within the history of Connecticut’s Park City. 

Tikeyah Whittle

If you’re a tea drinker, then you probably know the name Cindi Bigelow. She’s the third generation president and CEO of Fairfield-based Bigelow Tea.

Daniel X. O'Neil / Creative Commons

Justice for all? Or justice for the privileged?

This hour, we hear how one Connecticut-based incubator is helping vulnerable residents gain access to counsel. We also examine more wide-ranging efforts to narrow the country’s “justice gap.” 

SBSTNC / Creative Commons

Chuck Collins is a senior scholar at the Institute for Policy Studies. He's also an author, an editor, and a child of the so-called “one percent."

This hour, we sit down with Collins. We talk about his latest book and preview his upcoming appearance in Winsted, Connecticut. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty won re-election to the 5th District last November.

This hour, the Connecticut Democrat stops by our studios. We wade through national politics and find out what issues top her agenda on Capitol Hill. 

Yale University

Here's something that might make you might think twice before ordering a bucket of drumsticks: tasty as they may be, those cooked morsels of meat actually come from... dinosaurs.

This hour, we take a closer look at what paleontologists have learned about the prehistoric ancestors of modern-day birds

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Summer is officially here! And it looks like it's going to be a hot one.

This hour, we find out what opportunities -- and challenges -- lie ahead for Connecticut’s garden lovers. We check in with gardening expert Charlie Nardozzi, and we want to hear from you. 

Helge V. Keitel / Creative Commons

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, an estimated 56 percent of women will be employed or looking for work by the year 2024 -- that's a nearly one percent decrease from 2015.

Still, investment in female leadership has grown at some workplaces -- including Connecticut-based United Technologies Corporation.

Francois Schnell / Creative Commons

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), roughly one in five adults in the U.S. experiences a mental illness each year -- that’s approximately 20 percent of all American adults. But even as awareness increases, the stigma associated with mental illness persists.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This year Ghana celebrates its 60th year of independence. Coming up, we discuss the significance of that milestone with members of Connecticut's Ghanaian community.

Plus: a preview of this weekend's soccer friendly at East Hartford's Rentschler Field (a.k.a. "The Rent").

It's U.S.A. vs. Ghana. Will you be watching?

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