WNPR

Lydia Brown

Senior Producer

Lydia Brown is Senior Producer of the daily WNPR news-talk show, Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil.  

Before she became a producer, Lydia interned for WNPR's The Colin McEnroe Show and Where We Live

She holds a B.A. in Journalism and Music from New York University.

Ways to Connect

AnneCN / Creative Commons

Tuesday’s winter storm packed a punch -- bringing some much-needed precipitation to Connecticut.

But was the wet weather enough to hoist the state out of a long-running drought? This hour, we find out and ask whether the region can expect to see consistent dry spells. 

Eastern Connecticut Ballet

Five-foot, ten-inch dancer Gloria Govrin reached unprecedented heights when she joined the New York City Ballet nearly six decades ago. This hour, we take an in-depth look at her groundbreaking career -- including her work under choreographer George Balanchine ("Mr. B") -- and learn about the unique opportunity that brought her to Connecticut. 

Creative Commons

It’s hard to read the word "mafia" and not be reminded of scenes from The Godfather or Casino.

But mafias infiltrate more than just movie plots and crime novels. Their presence is felt in states and societies across the globe.

Bart Everson / Creative Commons

Get the lead out -- at least, that's what Connecticut renters Rosie Gallant and Adam Golka hoped to do after discovering the toxin in their Woodstock home. This hour, we hear their story and find out how repeated lead exposure has impacted the health of their infant daughter. 

Lydia Brown / WNPR

The Syrian conflict -- will it ever end? This hour, we sit down with former U.S. Ambassador to Syria Robert Ford. We get his take on the country’s civil war and refugee crisis, and discuss the future of U.S. intervention under President Trump. 

Spotmatik/iStock / Thinkstock

A new report from C-HIT -- the Connecticut Health Investigative Team -- looks at how emergency rooms across the state are grappling with a rising number of child mental health patients. The number is still mounting, it says, despite efforts to confront the issue by Governor Malloy and other officials. 

MichaelDaugherty.net

Sixty-two-year-old Michael Daugherty is a well-known and well-decorated contemporary American composer -- recognized for such works as his Grammy Award-winning Metropolis Symphony and 2015 cello concerto Tales of Hemingway

The Ethel Walker School

In a world of buzzing smartphones, endless meetings and persistent deadlines, how can we be more in-tune with ourselves and more creative in our endeavors?

Luis Pérez / Creative Commons

From self-service menus to self-driving cars to... androids around the water cooler? This hour, we explore the past, present, and future of workforce automation. 

Digital Vision / Thinkstock

This hour: breakthroughs in brain science.

Coming up, we take a look inside the minds of so-called "superagers" -- older adults whose brains are not only challenging the hands of time, but also raising some big questions within the scientific community. What are some of the best tips and tricks to keep your brain young and healthy? We take a closer look. 

Martin Svedén / Flickr Creative Commons

A tree’s roots touch more than just soil. They reach into the recesses of our past; into our culture and our traditions. It's something Fiona Stafford writes about in her new book The Long, Long Life of Trees. This hour, we sit down with the author. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Twenty-five-year-old hip-hop artist John Manselle-Young is well-known on the Connecticut stage -- performing under the pseudonym Tang Sauce. Coming up, we sit down with the musician to talk about his latest projects and hear his music live on-air. 

Alex Barth / Creative Commons

Fifty-eight years; fifty states; one governor's commitment to change. This hour: statehood for Puerto Rico -- is it in the cards? We consider what lies ahead for the island under its new leader, Gov. Ricardo Rosselló.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: two musicians, two nations, one unifying sound. We sit down with Brazilian jazz artists Joe Carter and Isabella Mendes. We learn about their unique backgrounds and influences, and we listen to the music that brought them together. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A new report gives voice to some of Connecticut's youngest domestic violence victims -- children six years old and younger. This hour, we take a look at the findings from that report and consider what’s being done to improve services for children who experience trauma. 

Michael Vadon / Creative Commons

The inauguration of Republican President-elect Donald Trump -- many will attend; some will boycott; will you be watching?

This hour, we preview the day's events with a team of reporters and political experts, and we want to hear from you. 

New Haven Promise

For some, the journey to higher education can feel more like a dead end -- an opportunity stifled by rising tuition fees and the weight of student loans.

Here in Connecticut however, initiatives such as New Haven Promise and Hartford Promise are working to make college more attainable to students.

This hour, we find out how. We sit down with officials from each Promise program and we also hear from you. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Music can be a powerful, transformative tool in the quest for social change. Protest songs are the songs associated with a particular movement. 

Earlier this month, Janelle Monáe and Wondaland produced the searing protest song "Hell You Talmbout." Nearly seven minutes long, it's a tribute to a long list of black men and women lost, and has been performed alongside protesters at Black Lives Matter rallies.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Budget woes, pension costs, job recovery -- those were just a few of the themes highlighted during Governor Dannel Malloy’s State of the State address last week.

This hour, Governor Malloy joins us live in-studio as we take a deeper look at those issues and more. 

Creative Commons

It’s hard to read the word "mafia" and not be reminded of scenes from The Godfather or Casino.

But mafias infiltrate more than just movie plots and crime novels. Their presence is felt in states and societies across the globe.

Emmanuel Huybrechts / Flickr Creative Commons

Labor pains and lessons from the north.

As Connecticut comes to terms with recent job loss, Massachusetts emerges as a regional leader in statewide job recovery. This hour, we explore the latest job market trends and find out what Connecticut stands to learn from the Bay State. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: two musicians, two nations, one unifying sound. We sit down with Brazilian jazz artists Joe Carter and Isabella Mendes. We learn about their unique backgrounds and influences, and we listen to the music that brought them together. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This year marks an important milestone in our nation's history -- 35 years since the discovery of HIV/AIDS. This hour, we look back to see how far we've come in understanding, treating, and destigmatizing HIV/AIDS in America. 

PBS

For nearly four and a half decades, Sonia Manzano was Maria -- a recurring female lead on the PBS television series "Sesame Street."

Last year, Manzano retired from the show and published a memoir. It’s called Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx.

Ken Hawkins / Creative Commons

Whether it's red or white, boxed or bottled -- few beverages stimulate the senses quite like a glass of wine does. Still, the science behind how the human body "tastes" wine -- well, it's more complex than you might think. 

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