Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host/Reporter

Lucy is a WNPR Reporter and local host of All Things Considered. She's also a contributor to National Public Radio. Her stories have aired on several NPR newsmagazine shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.    

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In September of 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She lives in Middletown with her family which includes two talented dogs, Sidney and Lily.

Find this Person On

Photo by Lucy Nalpathanchil

To date, 63 men and women from Connecticut have died while serving in the Iraq and Afghanistan wars. A small group of Connecticut residents are working to create a living memorial to these service members. It will be called the Connecticut Trees of Honor, and the planned site is in Middletown's Veterans Memorial Park.

Photo by Chion Wolf

Congressman Joe Courtney has sponsored a bill that could help veterans who are in school or planning to enroll using the Post 9-11 GI bill. The legislation would change how education funding is classified from the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by JimmyWayne

Some needing legal help find that their only option is to represent themselves 

Photo Courtesy of Flickr CC by Dr Relling

There's been a dramatic increase of West Nile Virus cases nationwide in just one week. The number of people who tested positive has increased to more than 1100. The federal Centers for Disease Control says its the largest outbreak ever seen in the country with at least forty-one deaths.

Ted Andreadis is the chief medical entomologist at the Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station.  Speaking on WNPR's Where We Live, he says there have been two human cases of West Nile Virus so far in the state.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by USDA

Connecticut has a new, destructive resident that most likely is here to stay. As WNPRs Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the arrival of the Emerald Ash Borer has caused state officials to impose a quarantine in one part of Connecticut.

J Colman / Creative Commons

In June, the federal government announced a rule change that would allow some illegal immigrants to avoid deportation. As WNPRs Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the date to apply for deferred action is coming up, prompting immigrant rights groups nationwide to get ready.

Congress has yet to pass The Dream Act, a federal law that would allow children brought to this country by their parents to apply for U.S citizenship. 

Decumanus (Wikimedia Commons)

Environmental advocates and Connecticut lobstermen are calling on state and federal lawmakers to do more to restore the health of Long Island Sound. As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the state's commercial lobster industry has been hit hard by a severely depleted lobster harvest.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by xxxtoff

Millions of bison used to roam parts of the U.S. more than two centuries ago. Once close to extinction, the commercial meat market has brought back the bison to farms in many states including Connecticut. In Goshen, a five-week old calf is getting a lot of attention since the day he was born. WNPRs Lucy Nalpathanchil has the story

Employers in cities across the country are requesting visas for high skilled foreign workers. As WNPRs Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, the demand has increased in the last decade according to the Brookings Institution.

This is the first time a report has looked at the local demand for foreign workers who receive H1-B visas to legally work in the U.S.

Senior Research Analyst at the Brookings Institution, Jill Wilson says the visa is widely requested by employers across the U.S not just those in the Silicon valley or NYC.

CVLC

A Connecticut attorney testified before Congress Wednesday on ways to improve the claims process for veterans who've been sexually assaulted while in the military. 

When veterans are raped or sexually assaulted while in the service, it's called military sexual trauma or MST.

The Department of Defense estimates more than 19,000 sexual assaults happened in 2010, but it's a problem that's often under-reported.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Ira Gelb

Students from Norwalk are raising awareness about human trafficking in an unusual way. As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, they're taking their campaign to rest areas on Interstate 95.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Null Value

It may be summer break but some high school science teachers from Connecticut and as far away as Thailand are in class this week to learn more about forensic science.  According to the University of New Haven which is running the training program, there's more demand for schools to offer courses in forensics.

For more details, WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil spoke with Steven Shiner.  He's the director of training at the Henry C. Lee Institute of Forensic Science at the University of New Haven.

The school has been running the program since 2005.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Originally aired on NPR's "All Things Considered"

This month, more than a dozen homeless veterans will finally have a place to call their own thanks to the American Legion. A local Post in a small Connecticut town has been working for a decade on a unique project to create not transitional, but permanent supportive housing in their rural community. 

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Mr G's Travels

A Workforce Development Board in Connecticut has received almosts $450,000 from the U.S. Labor Department. The Workplace, Inc. will use the grants to help homeless veterans and those who've been incarcerated. 

WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil spoke to Joe Carbone, the President and CEO of The Workplace, Inc about the programs to help veterans. The Workplace, Inc is sharing in more than 20 million in grants from the U.S. Labor Department that were awarded nationwide.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Jobs With Justice

Today's announcement by the Obama Administration that it will allow certain illegal immigrants to stay in the U.S. and have the ability to work without penalty is being embraced by undocumented students in Connecticut.

Courtesy of Institute for Community Research

A woman who worked tirelessly in the community to enact social change has died.

67-year-old Marlene Berg was one of the co-founders of Institute for Community Research in Hartford. 

Berg had just retired from the Institute for Community Research as the Associate Director of Training this past January after working there for more than 25 years. Her colleagues remember her as a passionate activist and researcher.

"Marlene was one of the bravest people I'd ever met. She was never afraid to say anything to anyone regardless of the consequences."

Photo by Lucy Nalpathanchil

An American Legion post in Jewett City has dedicated the last decade to raising money so it could help homeless veterans. On Monday, hundreds of Griswold residents turned out to celebrate the project's completion. Post 15 renovated its building so to provide 18 apartments to veterans who need housing.

U.S Navy

On Monday, The Center for Sexual Assault Crisis Counseling and Education in Stamford hosted a viewing of "Invisible War," an award-winning documentary about sexual assault in the military. More servicemembers who have experienced this trauma are starting to file claims with the VA.

Photo Courtesy of Women's Campaign School at Yale University

Sixty-four women from around the U.S and the globe will be in New Haven next week for an intensive five day session on politics. It's put on each summer by the Women's Campaign School at Yale University. WNPRs Lucy Nalpathanchil has more

Photo by Lucy Nalpathanchil

A coffee house in Middletown is showcasing the work of artists who are also veterans. WNPR’s Lucy Nalpathanchil has more

Al Kim works the night shift as a police officer for the city for the Middletown. During the day, he often hangs out at Klekolo World Coffee a few blocks from the police department. Kim is also a photographer and some of his work hangs on the walls of the small coffee shop. He points to one of them,  It’s a picture of the Swing Bridge over the Connecticut River.

Courtesy of the Gandy Family

There are more women serving in the U.S military now than ever before.  In fact, more than 255,000 women have been deployed to Iraq and Afghanistan in the last decade. They may be your neighbor or your co-worker but their stories often aren't told.

As part of our ongoing Coming Home Series, WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil has a remembrance of a Seymour veteran who served in the U.S Air Force.

41-year old Master Sergeant Latisha Kennedy joined the Air Force right after high school.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by HebeDesign

Does being outspoken help an individual become powerful in an organization?

If you're a man, the answer is 'yes' according to a study by Victoria Brescoll, assistant Professor of Organizational Behavior at Yale School of Management.

But she found the opposite is true for powerful women. Brescoll spoke with WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil about her research.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Senate Democrats

Coach Geno Auriemma is talking about UConn's recent decision to end its broadcast partnership with CPTV. The public television station had aired women's basketball games for eighteen seasons.  WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports

Courtesy of Nick Forte

Two graduates of the University of Connecticut have teamed up to tell the stories of women who share a common experience. 

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Sanofi Pasteur

Connecticut requires almost a dozen immunizations by the time a child enters school.  As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports there's a temporary shortage of one particular vaccine.

The vaccine is called Pentacel and it's a combination vaccine that protects children from several different diseases.

Diptheria, Tetanus, Pertussis, Polio and Meningitis. Four doses are required before a child turns nineteen months old.

But if your child is due for his or her next dose of Pentacel, it may not be available.

Dr. Suzanne Campbell

Fairfield University is participating in the nationwide initiative, Joining Forces, to to help veterans. WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil spoke with the Dean of the School Of Nursing, Dr Suzanne Campbell.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Laughing Squid

The state House of Representatives began debating the bill Wednesday afternoon and it passed late Wednesday night, 96-51.

The legislation calls for only allowing residents with certain debilitating conditions to purchase medical marijuana for palliative purposes.

Erik Williams is the Executive Director of CT NORML, the National Organization to Reform Marijuana Laws. He says this year's legislation is much improved from the bill last session.

Courtesy of Flickr CC by Mass Distraction

A study in 2009 found that drug overdose was the leading cause of death for 18 to 25 year-olds in Connecticut. As WNPR's Lucy Nalpathanchil reports, a bill is working its way through the General Assembly that supporters say could help prevent drug overdoses.

If someone overdoses on heroin or vicodin, there's a medication that can counteract the effects of the overdose. It's called Narcan and under state law--doctors can only prescribe it to drug users.

This could change under a bill recently passed by the state House.

Photo by Chion Wolf

Congresswoman Rosa DeLauro is reacting strongly against a decision by the House Agriculture Committee to cut $33 billion over 10 years from the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program known as SNAP.

46 million Americans rely on the food stamp program. A majority of them live in households with incomes below the poverty line.

A Yale School of Music student is competing in an unique competition to earn a solo with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra.

Kristan Toczko is one of eight semi finalists competing in a YouTube Concerto Competition. They're featured on the PSO's website, which calls this competition the first of its kind. The public is encouraged to vote until April 30. Those votes will choose up to four finalists who will then audition in person for PSO Conductor, Manfred Honeck. The winner receives $10,000 and two solo performances with the Pittsburgh Symphony Orchestra this fall.

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