Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host of "Where We Live"

Lucy is the host of WNPR's popular talk show, "Where We Live".

She stepped into this role after being a public radio reporter for 17 years. She's covered everything from education to immigration, juvenile justice and child welfare issues to veterans' affairs and the military.

Connecticut has been her home for a decade now after Lucy moved here in 2006 to become WNPR's Assignment Editor.

She's also been local host for mid-day programming and for "All Things Considered."

She contributes to National Public Radio and her stories have aired on several national NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekend All Things Considered, Here and Now, and Latino USA.  

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In September of 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She lives in Suffield with her family which includes two talented dogs, Sidney and Lily.

Ways to Connect

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Immigration reform is a hot topic this presidential election year. Often, the question of who’s living here illegally centers on the many immigrants who cross the country's southern border. But the federal government deports people from countries across the globe. That includes a Connecticut woman who in three months must leave the country and her family. 

CT Senate Democrats / Creative Commons

On Thursday, Governor Dannel Malloy said Connecticut has ended veteran homelessness in the state. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Residents who need help paying for child care can apply for state assistance but homeless families often don't meet the guidelines to be eligible for the program.

CT Senate Democrats/Creative Commons

Should Connecticut require paid family and medical leave? The state Department of Labor will report back to lawmakers this legislative session on how the state could implement the proposed law. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

With another legislative session about to begin, Governor Dannel Malloy has announced new proposals under his Second Chance Society initiative. One of his ideas will change how the state defines a juvenile delinquent.

Rep. Esty's office

Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty says progress is being made in Afghanistan. She recently returned from a visit there and to Kuwait as part of a bipartisan delegation. 

Cyclonebiskit / Creative Commons

Connecticut has received a $54 million federal grant to improve shoreline infrastructure and make portions of the state more resilient.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

A court monitor said the state is failing to meet critical measurements because of a lack of funding.

The U.S. Army via Flickr / Creative Commons

Almost two years ago, advocates filed a class action lawsuit against the Department of Defense seeking records for how often veterans with "other than honorable" or "bad" discharges applied for discharge upgrades due to their PTSD diagnoses. Now the DOD will be turning over that information.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut Congresswoman Elizabeth Esty, who represents an area of the state that includes Newtown, will be in attendance Tuesday night during President Barack Obama's final State of the Union address. 

Appearing on WNPR's Where We Live, Esty praised the president's executive actions announced last week.

Connecticut VA Healthcare System

The federal Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) is investigating the death of a patient who was found in a public bathroom at the West Haven VA hospital last month. 

Lori Mack / WNPR

Immigration activists held a rally on Wednesday in New Haven against plans by federal officials to round up Central Americans who have recently crossed the border illegally. 

Stephen Dunn / WNPR

The debate over who should be allowed into the U.S. continues to dominate headlines, most recently at last week's Republican presidential debate. All of the GOP candidates said they oppose the Obama administration's plans to permit 10,000 more Syrian refugees into the country. Syrians living in Connecticut are following the rhetoric closely. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Naval Submarine Base New London has a new leader. U.S. Navy Captain Paul Whitescarver, formerly of Norfolk, Virginia, is the SUBASE's new commanding officer.

Cpl. Damany S. Coleman lejeune.marines.mil / Creative Commons

Several veterans groups have filed a Freedom of Information request seeking records about a Veterans Affairs (VA) program that decides disability compensation claims related to toxic water exposure. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Pentagon has announced it will send additional Special Operations forces to Iraq and Syria to help defeat the so-called Islamic State. The news shouldn't be a surprise according to Connecticut's U.S. Senator Chris Murphy, but he said it is concerning.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

On Friday, an interfaith coalition gathered at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford to condemn terrorism and Islamophobia after last weekend's Paris attacks. 

Aliyya Swaby / New Haven Independent

A young Syrian family is now living in New Haven after Indiana officials objected to plans for the refugees to resettle in their state. Local officials scrambled to accommodate the family of three. 


The civil war in Syria has claimed thousands of lives and led millions of Syrians to seek refuge in other countries, including the U.S. Federal officials said just 2,100 of them have been resettled in the U.S. so far.

In Connecticut, there's been a developing grassroots effort over the last several months to help Syrian refugees.

Dominic Chavez / World Bank

More than two dozen U.S. governors are publicly opposing the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the wake of attacks in Paris last week.

But in Connecticut, Governor Dannel Malloy said the state will continue to welcome refugees who undergo a rigorous security screening. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

There's a bill in Congress that could expand a unique legal-medical partnership in Connecticut to the rest of the country. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut has received national attention for juvenile justice reforms, like its efforts to reduce the number of kids in the system. But advocates say a black eye remains.

For years, critics of the Connecticut Juvenile Training School have called on lawmakers to close the facility for delinquent boys, saying youth -- especially with a history of trauma -- aren't being helped. 


In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you stories from veterans and those in their community.

Adaptive athlete Earl Granville joined the Pennsylvania Army National Guard with his twin brother. He was medically retired from the Army after being hit by a roadside bomb in Afghanistan in 2008.

MarineCorps NewYork / Creative Commons

Wednesday is November 11, a date originally designated by President Woodrow Wilson as Armistice Day to mark the end of World War I. After World War II, however, it was renamed Veterans Day to honor all Americans who have served. 

Victor Suwatcharapinun / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR is highlighting stories from veterans and those in their communities.

Ben Cooper lives in Colchester and was a combat medic in World War II.