WNPR

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host of "Where We Live"

Lucy is the host of WNPR's popular talk show, "Where We Live".

She's been a public radio reporter for nearly 20 years covering everything from education to immigration, juvenile justice and child welfare issues to veterans' affairs and the military.

Connecticut has been her home for a decade now after Lucy moved here in 2006 to become WNPR's Assignment Editor.

She's also been local host for mid-day programming and for "All Things Considered."

She contributes to National Public Radio and her stories have aired on several national NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekend All Things Considered, Here and Now, and Latino USA.  

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In September of 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She and her husband, Jason live in Suffield with their two children and a small zoo.

Ways to Connect

Tania Caruso / Flickr

Where do gender disparities exist for women and girls in our state? And how do we address them?

Bossi / Creative Commons

In the past decade, the amount of money that students owe for education has more than doubled to almost $1.4 trillion, and tuition for college has increased nearly 400 percent in the last 30 years. 

Eleanor Roosevelt (second from left) and Lorena Hickok (far right)
Franklin D. Roosevelt Library / Wikimedia Commons

Eleanor Roosevelt was a woman with a huge historical footprint—First Lady, first U.S. delegate to the United Nations General Assembly. She was dubbed “The First Lady of the World” by Harry Truman. 

But how much is known about Eleanor’s personal life beyond the politics and activism? This hour, we sit down with Connecticut author Amy Bloom. Her new book, White Houses, is a fictional novel that explores Eleanor’s real-life romantic relationship with female journalist Lorena Hickok.

"Starman" in Elon Musk's Tesla Roadster with Earth in the background
SpaceX / Flickr

SpaceX CEO Elon Musk made history in February when his Falcon Heavy rocket launched a red Tesla convertible into outer space. In the driver seat is a dummy astronaut dubbed “Starman” who’s now flying through space, orbiting the sun.

Tikeyah Whittle / WNPR

If you’re a tea drinker, then you probably know the name Cindi Bigelow. She’s the third generation president and CEO of Fairfield-based Bigelow Tea.

Vladimir Pustovit / Creative Commons

There are many questions a young woman will face as she matures. Among them: What is her timeline for building a family? And how many kids does she expect to have?

But not all women want to become mothers. 

Michael Gil / Wikimedia Commons

The nation is waking up to another devastating tragedy—this time, a school shooting in a Florida high school. Police say 17 are dead, more than a dozen others have been hospitalized. The shooter, a former student, is in custody.

Lydia Brown / WNPR

This hour: a lesson in public history. How are towns and cities across Connecticut and the Northeast engaging residents with the past?

We check in with a team of experts and historians. We look at examples of locally driven projects and initiatives, and consider their impact on community building and sense of place.

Do you feel a strong tie to your community’s history? We want to hear from you. 

Michael Blann/Digital Vision / Thinkstock

Who should be able to build casinos in Connecticut?

Plans by the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes to build a third gaming facility in East Windsor have stalled, and lawmakers in southwestern Connecticut are now pushing a bill to scrap that plan in favor of a new casino in Bridgeport.

Aequorea victoria
Sierra Blakely / Wikimedia Commons

Did you know 75 percent of animals in the ocean glow?

Andy Fleischmann - State Representative for West Hartford and Co-Chair of the CT General Assembly Education Committee.
Chion Wolf / WNPR

The state Supreme Court ruled last month that the way Connecticut funds public schools doesn’t violate the state’s constitution.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: "the search for William Grimes."

We talk to author and film producer Regina Mason about her quest to find her great-great-great-grandfather -- a New Haven resident and runaway slave. 

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

This year marks the 20th anniversary of the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center in Southeast Connecticut.

Coming up, we tour the 300,000-plus-square-foot facility. What makes its exhibitions so critical today? 

Lydia Brown / WNPR

It’s the deadliest drug crisis in our nation’s history and communities in Connecticut are coming together to talk about solutions.

This hour, we listen back to a recent opioid panel recorded at Gateway Community College in New Haven.

What’s the best way to support individuals and families battling substance abuse -- especially when one size does not fit all?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Catherine Smith is Commissioner of Connecticut's Department of Economic and Community Development. This hour, she stops by for an update on the state's economy and manufacturing workforce.

Later, we also check in with Goodwin College President Mark Scheinberg. How is his school training the next generation of manufacturing employees? We find out and we also hear from you. 

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