WNPR

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host of "Where We Live"

Lucy is the host of WNPR's popular talk show, "Where We Live".

She's been a public radio reporter for nearly 20 years covering everything from education to immigration, juvenile justice and child welfare issues to veterans' affairs and the military.

Connecticut has been her home for a decade now after Lucy moved here in 2006 to become WNPR's Assignment Editor.

She's also been local host for mid-day programming and for "All Things Considered."

She contributes to National Public Radio and her stories have aired on several national NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekend All Things Considered, Here and Now, and Latino USA.  

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In September of 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She and her husband, Jason live in Suffield with their two children and a small zoo.

Ways to Connect

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It's an important monthly cycle for half the world's population, yet even in 2017 many people aren’t comfortable talking about it.

This hour, why is menstruation so taboo, even though it’s a basic part of human biology?

arinahabich/iStock / Thinkstock

It’s the holiday season -- the perfect time to kick back and get lost in a new podcast... or two... or three... or four. But how do you decide what to listen to?

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Sierra Blakely / Wikimedia Commons

Did you know 75 percent of animals in the ocean glow?

Chion Wolf / WNPR

When we hear the words “autism diagnosis” it’s common to imagine a young child or adolescent.

But what about those who receive their diagnoses at a later stage of life -- in the midst of successful careers or long, happy marriages?

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In recent weeks, one industry after another in the U.S. has begun to confront sexual harassment and assault.

But the military has known for years that it has a problem—by the U.S. Department of Defense’s own estimate, nearly 15,000 service members were sexually assaulted in 2016.

David Tipling / Yale University Press

Yes we’ve gotten a few inches of snow already, but winter officially starts next week.

For animals, preparing for the season means undertaking major lifestyle changes in order to survive.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Ten months after the tragic death of Hartford teenager Matthew Tirado -- a look at what’s being done to safeguard the lives of children with disabilities.

Coming up, we hear about a recent Office of the Child Advocate investigation into the case of 17-year-old Tirado.

The report recommends improvements that apply to school districts statewide. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Board of Regents will vote on a proposal that would dramatically restructure Connecticut’s community colleges later this week.

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Sixteen years after the U.S. entered into war with Afghanistan -- a look at one woman's efforts to inform and inspire young Afghan girls.

This hour, Shabana Basij-Rasikh talks about her upbringing under the Taliban in Kabul and about her experience co-founding SOLA -- the School of Leadership, Afghanistan

Lisa McHale

This hour: the National Football League.

Just hearing those words once beckoned vivid mental images -- scenes of athletes entertaining millions with their heroic throws and jaw-clenching tackles.

In recent years, however, the NFL's image has darkened -- clouded by concerns surrounding athlete behavior and a brain disease known as CTE. 

Carmen Baskauf / WNPR

It started as a hashtag and has grown into a cultural moment.

Till Westermayer / Flickr

For someone with food allergies, a taste of peanut butter or a bite of shellfish could be life-threatening.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

WNPR’s Jeff Cohen and Ryan Caron King are back on the ground in Puerto Rico.

This hour: an update from The Island Next Door. We get the latest on local recovery efforts in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Growing up, author Regina Louise bounced around the foster care system, experiencing one unsuccessful placement after another.

Carmen Baskauf

Thursday, November 30 marks the final day of Native American Heritage Month.

Coming up, we honor the occasion with a tour of the Mashantucket Pequot Museum and Research Center -- a 300,000-plus-square-foot facility in Southeast Connecticut.

There, we wind our way through vivid displays of Native American history and culture.

What makes these exhibitions so critical today? 

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