WNPR

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host of "Where We Live"

Lucy is the host of WNPR's popular talk show, "Where We Live".

She stepped into this role after being a public radio reporter for 17 years. She's covered everything from education to immigration, juvenile justice and child welfare issues to veterans' affairs and the military.

Connecticut has been her home for a decade now after Lucy moved here in 2006 to become WNPR's Assignment Editor.

She's also been local host for mid-day programming and for "All Things Considered."

She contributes to National Public Radio and her stories have aired on several national NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekend All Things Considered, Here and Now, and Latino USA.  

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In September of 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She lives in Suffield with her family which includes two talented dogs, Sidney and Lily.

Ways to Connect

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

One week has passed since Republican Donald Trump was elected to become the 45th president of the United States. In that time, thousands of immigrants and activists have come together to protest the new President-elect, citing, among other things, Trump's proposals on immigration. 

The U.S. Army / Creative Commons

Seventy-five years ago, Americans across the country put their lives on hold, leaving their homes and risking their lives to fight a brutal war by land, sea and air.

Today is Veterans Day, and while we honor Veterans of all wars on this day, this hour we hear the stories of the men and women of World War II.

Ninian Reid / Creative Commons

From businessman to president-elect -- it was a victory that surprised many. This hour: the rise of Republican Donald Trump. We recap Tuesday’s election results and we also hear from you.

Did you vote? What does a Trump presidency mean to you, your friends, and your family? 

Cali4beach / Creative Commons

Election day is here! Crowds are gathering at polling stations across the country and the world is watching to see who’s voted in and who’s voted out.

This hour, we want to hear from voters. Did you get up early to vote at the polling center in your town? Have you encountered long lines? Are the voting machines working as they should? 

Steve Johnson / Creative Commons

Connecticut is in a drought. But what does that mean for the state’s water resources? This hour, we follow up on the controversy surrounding Bloomfield’s new Niagara Bottling facility.

The California-based company will be allowed to bottle millions, if not billions, of gallons of public water -- something critics warn against due to recent climate trends. Coming up, we take a closer look. 

© Council Brandon

Since the summer, thousands have stood up against the Dakota Access Pipeline -- a multi-billion dollar project, which would carry crude oil through the Dakotas, Iowa, and Illinois. 

Devon Buchanan / Creative Commons

Since October, women across the country have been coming forward with allegations against Donald Trump. Their actions follow the release of a 2005 video recording, in which the Republican presidential nominee can be heard making vulgar remarks about women. 

William Murphy / Creative Commons

It has been 100 years since the Easter Rising in Ireland -- when Irish nationalists rebelled against the British government in Dublin and other parts of the country in 1916. The rebellion eventually led to Irish independence and civil war.

Jameziecakes / Creative Commons

Public school superintendents in the state’s three largest cities — Bridgeport, New Haven and Hartford — have all recently announced their resignations.

This hour, we look at superintendent turnover in Connecticut.

Phil Roeder / Creative Commons

It’s almost election day and voting demographics have changed dramatically since our last presidential election. The number of eligible Hispanic voters has jumped 17 percent since 2012 according to the Pew Research Center.

This hour, we talk about the Latino vote here in Connecticut and nationwide.

BrianSwan / Creative Commons

Connecticut is home to some of the wealthiest Americans in the country, and yet its cities are among the nation’s poorest. Some say the first step to ending this inequality is to spread the wealth from thriving suburban areas to struggling urban areas.

This hour, we talk regionalization – will Connecticut ever embrace it as the state struggles with constant deficits?

Vladimir Agafonkin / Creative Commons

August Wilson's Pulitzer Prize-winning play The Piano Lesson opens this Friday at Hartford Stage. This hour, we preview the production. We also find out how it's inspiring some Connecticut residents to open up about the importance of family legacy. 

COD Newsroom / Creative Commons

As traditional college graduates shoulder large student loan debt and companies hunt for skilled labor, technical and vocational high schools are garnering more attention. Do skills like 3D printing and precision machining really help students get jobs and higher wages?

This hour, we explore the value of career and technical education in Connecticut and nationwide.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Election Day is just around the corner, which means it’s almost time to cast your vote in Connecticut's U.S. Senate race. Last month, Republican candidate Dan Carter stopped by for an in-depth look at his campaign. 

This hour, it's Democratic incumbent Richard Blumenthal's turn to answer our questions and hear from you. As always, we take your calls, tweets, and emails.  

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Between the name-calling, finger-pointing, and off-color remarks, it's hard to imagine a political contest more uncivil than the 2016 presidential race.

But is civility as a whole in jeopardy? This hour, we take closer look with How Civility Works author Keith J. Bybee. 

Dannel Malloy / Creative Commons

The state Department of Children and Families is back in the news facing sharp criticism over multiple issues. This hour, we dig into them and we'll examine what, if anything, needs to change within DCF.

La super Lili / Creative Commons

There is no shortage of places to gamble in the northeast -- with casinos in states like New York, Rhode Island, Pennsylvania and of course Connecticut where high rollers can try their luck at Mohegan Sun or Foxwoods Resort Casino in the southeastern part of the state.

And more casinos are on their way.

This hour, we get an update on MGM Springfield and where plans stand to open a third casino in North Central Connecticut operated jointly by the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, as part of WNPR’s week-long reporting series on the opioid epidemic, we explore racial disparities within the context of America’s crack cocaine and opioid crises

zeevveez / Flickr Creative Commons

Five million Americans are living with Alzheimer’s disease -- the sixth leading cause of death in this country. There are many caregivers who provide unpaid care for their relatives with Alzheimer’s or other types of dementias -- but it’s not an easy role to fill.

This hour, we explore caregiving and how it can impact a person’s physical and emotional health -- and their finances. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Connecticut Democrat Richard Blumenthal is vying for a second term in the U.S. Senate. His challenger? Forty-nine year-old Republican state representative and military veteran, Dan Carter

DonkeyHotey / Creative Commons

Monday night was an historic night for American politics. Democrat Hillary Clinton and Republican Donald Trump went head-to-head in their first presidential debate -- and boy, did things get interesting.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Thousands of immigrants move to Connecticut each year. Who are they and why do they come here? We’re starting an occasional series on Where We Live to hear their stories.

Ricardo Henriquez quit his job as a prominent journalist in Chile and sold everything he owned before moving to Connecticut in 2001. 

DonkeyHotey / Creative Commons

It’s debate season and Monday night marks the first showdown between presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump.

This hour, we discuss what this first presidential debate means for voters in the Nutmeg State and nationwide. And we talk with PolitiFact.com founder Bill Adair on how his team wades through statements that come out of the mouths of politicians. What does fact checking mean for you this election season? 

Kenneth Lu / Creative Commons

News of General Electric's departure rang loudly across Connecticut this year, causing some to point fingers at the state's so-called “anti-business climate.” Still, that hasn't stopped some international businesses from putting down roots here. 

Victor Björkund / Creative Commons

Zero tolerance policies send a strong message to students but at what cost?

This hour, we examine how over time, these policies have led to suspensions and expulsions for minor issues -- and can have drastic effects on a student’s future.

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