WNPR

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host of "Where We Live"

Lucy is the host of WNPR's popular talk show, "Where We Live".

She stepped into this role after being a public radio reporter for 17 years. She's covered everything from education to immigration, juvenile justice and child welfare issues to veterans' affairs and the military.

Connecticut has been her home for a decade now after Lucy moved here in 2006 to become WNPR's Assignment Editor.

She's also been local host for mid-day programming and for "All Things Considered."

She contributes to National Public Radio and her stories have aired on several national NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekend All Things Considered, Here and Now, and Latino USA.  

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In September of 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She lives in Suffield with her family which includes two talented dogs, Sidney and Lily.

Ways to Connect

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Last year was a landmark year for the U.S. military and its servicemembers. For the first time, women were granted equal access to all military combat roles

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Are you a cat owner -- a self-described “cat mom” or “cat dad”? If you answered “yes” to that question, then here’s another one for you: Do you let your feline slink around outdoors? 

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The Caribbean -- its islands, its history and its people -- has had a profound influence on communities around the globe -- including Connecticut.

This hour, we talk with author Joshua Jelly-Schapiro about his new book, Island People: The Caribbean and the World

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As parents, we tell our children to look both ways before crossing the street. We remind them to use crosswalks and to obey crossing signals. But practicing what we preach -- well, that's a whole different story.

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Boxing is known as the "sweet science" and the sport once drew large crowds in our cities -- spurring on neighborhood rivalries and banding together immigrant communities.

This hour, we explore Connecticut’s boxing history and we learn of a new effort to rekindle the sport in Bridgeport.

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Recently we did a show about the science of loving where you live and we heard from plenty of Connecticut residents who really do love living here. But that sentiment is not shared by everyone. Some residents say high taxes are driving them away to places like Florida and North Carolina.

This hour, we talk about out-migration from Connecticut. We also explore the number of people who are moving into the state — what’s known as in-migration. And we want to hear from you. Are you looking to leave Connecticut once you retire? If not, why do you want to stay here?  

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They're moms and mentors; mathematicians and microbiologists.

This hour: women in STEM. We hear from a team of women scientists and engineers, and consider what's being done to foster the next wave of female STEM leaders. 

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Hate crimes and incidents of intimidation and harassment have increased across our nation, including here in Connecticut.

This hour, we speak with Connecticut's U.S. Attorney Deirdre Daly about a letter she wrote to the community urging residents to speak up and report these incidents.

PBS

For nearly four and a half decades, Sonia Manzano was Maria -- a recurring female lead on the PBS television series "Sesame Street."

Last year, Manzano retired from the show and published a memoir. It’s called Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx.

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Labor pains and lessons from the north.

As Connecticut comes to terms with recent job loss, Massachusetts emerges as a regional leader in statewide job recovery. This hour, we explore the latest job market trends and find out what Connecticut stands to learn from the Bay State. 

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Governor Dannel Malloy wants to close Connecticut’s juvenile jail in Middletown by mid-2018, but what will replace it?

This hour, we hear from the Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance about its new report that includes the perspective of delinquent youth. The youth offer their opinions on how the state can improve its juvenile justice system.

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What is the future of higher education?

This hour, we preview an upcoming Connecticut Forum with one of the forum panelists -- Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, III. The President of the University of Maryland Baltimore County tells us how his school encourages diversity and innovation.

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Friends and family gather this week for the Thanksgiving holiday. It’s a time when we celebrate with each other and give thanks. But holidays can be an especially difficult time for those who have lost a spouse or another loved one.

This hour, we take a look at loss, grief and widowhood. If you are a young widow or widower, how do you begin a new chapter of life?

Richard Longstreth

In honor of the impending weekend, we're tossing politics aside and rolling down our windows for a road trip -- a journey through the history of American architecture and our long-standing relationship with on-the-road adventure. 

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A new commander in chief will lead the nation in January and some Americans are wondering about what he will do to keep our planet healthy.

This hour, we consider how a Trump Administration could impact global efforts to tackle climate change and how health care might evolve under the new President's watch. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

One week has passed since Republican Donald Trump was elected to become the 45th president of the United States. In that time, thousands of immigrants and activists have come together to protest the new President-elect, citing, among other things, Trump's proposals on immigration. 

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Why are some people more susceptible to addiction than others? How does genetic makeup influence a person’s chances of becoming an addict? This hour, we find out how researchers at Yale University and The Jackson Laboratory are working to better understand the science of addiction. 

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Seventy-five years ago, Americans across the country put their lives on hold, leaving their homes and risking their lives to fight a brutal war by land, sea and air.

Today is Veterans Day, and while we honor Veterans of all wars on this day, this hour we hear the stories of the men and women of World War II.

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From businessman to president-elect -- it was a victory that surprised many. This hour: the rise of Republican Donald Trump. We recap Tuesday’s election results and we also hear from you.

Did you vote? What does a Trump presidency mean to you, your friends, and your family? 

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Election day is here! Crowds are gathering at polling stations across the country and the world is watching to see who’s voted in and who’s voted out.

This hour, we want to hear from voters. Did you get up early to vote at the polling center in your town? Have you encountered long lines? Are the voting machines working as they should? 

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Connecticut is in a drought. But what does that mean for the state’s water resources? This hour, we follow up on the controversy surrounding Bloomfield’s new Niagara Bottling facility.

The California-based company will be allowed to bottle millions, if not billions, of gallons of public water -- something critics warn against due to recent climate trends. Coming up, we take a closer look. 

© Council Brandon

Since the summer, thousands have stood up against the Dakota Access Pipeline -- a multi-billion dollar project, which would carry crude oil through the Dakotas, Iowa, and Illinois. 

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Since October, women across the country have been coming forward with allegations against Donald Trump. Their actions follow the release of a 2005 video recording, in which the Republican presidential nominee can be heard making vulgar remarks about women. 

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It has been 100 years since the Easter Rising in Ireland -- when Irish nationalists rebelled against the British government in Dublin and other parts of the country in 1916. The rebellion eventually led to Irish independence and civil war.

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