WNPR

Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host of "Where We Live"

Lucy is the host of WNPR's popular talk show, "Where We Live".

She stepped into this role after being a public radio reporter for 17 years. She's covered everything from education to immigration, juvenile justice and child welfare issues to veterans' affairs and the military.

Connecticut has been her home for a decade now after Lucy moved here in 2006 to become WNPR's Assignment Editor.

She's also been local host for mid-day programming and for "All Things Considered."

She contributes to National Public Radio and her stories have aired on several national NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekend All Things Considered, Here and Now, and Latino USA.  

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In September of 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She lives in Suffield with her family which includes two talented dogs, Sidney and Lily.

Ways to Connect

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

War and poverty displace millions of people around the world.

This hour, we hear from two Connecticut artists who have personal experience with the global refugee and migrant crisis.

Keoni Cabral / Creative Commons

How mental illness is treated across our nation could change under a new federal law.

This hour — the Mental Health Reform Act — what is it and what does it mean for mental health and substance abuse treatment in our state?

Emmanuel Huybrechts / Flickr Creative Commons

Labor pains and lessons from the north.

As Connecticut comes to terms with recent job loss, Massachusetts emerges as a regional leader in statewide job recovery. This hour, we explore the latest job market trends and find out what Connecticut stands to learn from the Bay State. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour: two musicians, two nations, one unifying sound. We sit down with Brazilian jazz artists Joe Carter and Isabella Mendes. We learn about their unique backgrounds and influences, and we listen to the music that brought them together. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

African Americans are a diverse group of people who live in our cities and our suburbs.

This hour, what does it mean to be black in Connecticut?

Boston Public Library / Flickr Creative Commons

Boxing is known as the "sweet science" and the sport once drew large crowds in our cities -- spurring on neighborhood rivalries and banding together immigrant communities.

This hour, we explore Connecticut’s boxing history and we learn of a new effort to rekindle the sport in Bridgeport.

Yoan Carle / Flickr Creative Commons

From self-driving cars to 3D printing to hydrokinetic energy technology, New Englanders are at the forefront of the latest cutting edge tech. 

This hour, we explore the latest gadgets and tech trends and learn about their impact locally and around the globe.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Friends and family gather this week for the holidays. It’s a time when we celebrate with each other and give thanks. But holidays can be an especially difficult time for those who have lost a spouse or another loved one.

PBS

For nearly four and a half decades, Sonia Manzano was Maria -- a recurring female lead on the PBS television series "Sesame Street."

Last year, Manzano retired from the show and published a memoir. It’s called Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx.

Ken Hawkins / Creative Commons

Whether it's red or white, boxed or bottled -- few beverages stimulate the senses quite like a glass of wine does. Still, the science behind how the human body "tastes" wine -- well, it's more complex than you might think. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

State officials, community providers and youth advocates are continuing their work to reform juvenile justice in Connecticut. The latest efforts have been focused on a plan to close the state’s juvenile jail in Middletown.

This hour, Department of Children and Families Commissioner Joette Katz and Deputy Commissioner Fernando Muñiz join us in-studio to talk about the department’s plan to shutter the Connecticut Juvenile Training School and its other responsibilities as the state’s child welfare agency. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Immigrants in Connecticut come from many different backgrounds. They’re white-collar or blue-collar workers -- they’re artists and students. We have an occasional series on Where We Live that highlights their stories.

Photo courtesy of United Congregational Church-Bridgeport

A picturesque building that’s been the home of the United Congregational Church in Bridgeport -- for 91 years -- will soon be transformed into a mosque.

This hour, we learn the story behind the Bridgeport Islamic Community Center’s plans to purchase the UCC church and the strong interfaith partnership that will make the purchase possible. 

DVIDSHUB / Creative Commons

Last year was a landmark year for the U.S. military and its servicemembers. For the first time, women were granted equal access to all military combat roles

Kevin Dooley / Creative Commons

Are you a cat owner -- a self-described “cat mom” or “cat dad”? If you answered “yes” to that question, then here’s another one for you: Do you let your feline slink around outdoors? 

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center / Creative Commons

The Caribbean -- its islands, its history and its people -- has had a profound influence on communities around the globe -- including Connecticut.

This hour, we talk with author Joshua Jelly-Schapiro about his new book, Island People: The Caribbean and the World

marnalbano / Creative Commons

As parents, we tell our children to look both ways before crossing the street. We remind them to use crosswalks and to obey crossing signals. But practicing what we preach -- well, that's a whole different story.

Boston Public Library / Creative Commons

Boxing is known as the "sweet science" and the sport once drew large crowds in our cities -- spurring on neighborhood rivalries and banding together immigrant communities.

This hour, we explore Connecticut’s boxing history and we learn of a new effort to rekindle the sport in Bridgeport.

Nicolas Raymond / Creative Commons

Recently we did a show about the science of loving where you live and we heard from plenty of Connecticut residents who really do love living here. But that sentiment is not shared by everyone. Some residents say high taxes are driving them away to places like Florida and North Carolina.

This hour, we talk about out-migration from Connecticut. We also explore the number of people who are moving into the state — what’s known as in-migration. And we want to hear from you. Are you looking to leave Connecticut once you retire? If not, why do you want to stay here?  

University of Liverpool Faculty of Health & Life Sciences / Creative Commons

They're moms and mentors; mathematicians and microbiologists.

This hour: women in STEM. We hear from a team of women scientists and engineers, and consider what's being done to foster the next wave of female STEM leaders. 

Mark / Creative Commons

Hate crimes and incidents of intimidation and harassment have increased across our nation, including here in Connecticut.

This hour, we speak with Connecticut's U.S. Attorney Deirdre Daly about a letter she wrote to the community urging residents to speak up and report these incidents.

PBS

For nearly four and a half decades, Sonia Manzano was Maria -- a recurring female lead on the PBS television series "Sesame Street."

Last year, Manzano retired from the show and published a memoir. It’s called Becoming Maria: Love and Chaos in the South Bronx.

Emmanuel Huybrechts / Creative Commons

Labor pains and lessons from the north.

As Connecticut comes to terms with recent job loss, Massachusetts emerges as a regional leader in statewide job recovery. This hour, we explore the latest job market trends and find out what Connecticut stands to learn from the Bay State. 

DonkeyHotey / Creative Commons

Governor Dannel Malloy wants to close Connecticut’s juvenile jail in Middletown by mid-2018, but what will replace it?

This hour, we hear from the Connecticut Juvenile Justice Alliance about its new report that includes the perspective of delinquent youth. The youth offer their opinions on how the state can improve its juvenile justice system.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Creative Commons

What is the future of higher education?

This hour, we preview an upcoming Connecticut Forum with one of the forum panelists -- Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, III. The President of the University of Maryland Baltimore County tells us how his school encourages diversity and innovation.

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