Lucy Nalpathanchil

Host of "Where We Live"

Lucy is the new host of WNPR's popular talk show, "Where We Live".

She's excited to take on this role after being a public radio reporter for 17 years. She's covered everything from education to immigration, juvenile justice and child welfare issues to veterans' affairs and the military.

Connecticut has been her home for 10 years after Lucy moved here in 2006 to become WNPR's Assignment Editor.

She's also been local host for mid-day programming and for "All Things Considered."

She contributes to National Public Radio and her stories have aired on several national NPR shows including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition, Weekend All Things Considered, Here and Now, and Latino USA.  

During her time in Connecticut, Lucy has focused on immigration including New Haven's controversial ID card program, efforts for an in-state tuition law for undocumented students, and the Becoming American series: stories of immigrants and the citizenship process.  In 2011, Lucy launched the Coming Home Project to tell the stories of returning Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans in transition. To learn more about the military, Lucy was chosen to take part in a week-long training for journalists hosted by the U.S Army at Fort Leavenworth, KS and Fort Leonard Woods, MO. Getting up at 3:30 am to participate in boot camp was most memorable! 

In September of 2014, she was selected to join military reporters around the country for a conference hosted by the Medill National Security Journalism Initiative in Washington D.C.

Lucy has worked in several states as a public radio reporter after beginning her career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh. She's received awards from Pennsylvania's Golden Quill, the New York State Associated Press, the Mayor's Asian American Advisory Board in Jacksonville, Florida, the Connecticut Associated Press and the state's Society for Professional Journalists chapter.

When she's not in the newsroom, Lucy enjoys traveling, hiking, and planning her next garden. She lives in Middletown with her family which includes two talented dogs, Sidney and Lily.

Ways to Connect

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

On Friday, an interfaith coalition gathered at the Legislative Office Building in Hartford to condemn terrorism and Islamophobia after last weekend's Paris attacks. 

Aliyya Swaby / New Haven Independent

A young Syrian family is now living in New Haven after Indiana officials objected to plans for the refugees to resettle in their state. Local officials scrambled to accommodate the family of three. 

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The civil war in Syria has claimed thousands of lives and led millions of Syrians to seek refuge in other countries, including the U.S. Federal officials said just 2,100 of them have been resettled in the U.S. so far.

In Connecticut, there's been a developing grassroots effort over the last several months to help Syrian refugees.

Dominic Chavez / World Bank

More than two dozen U.S. governors are publicly opposing the resettlement of Syrian refugees in the wake of attacks in Paris last week.

But in Connecticut, Governor Dannel Malloy said the state will continue to welcome refugees who undergo a rigorous security screening. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

There's a bill in Congress that could expand a unique legal-medical partnership in Connecticut to the rest of the country. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut has received national attention for juvenile justice reforms, like its efforts to reduce the number of kids in the system. But advocates say a black eye remains.

For years, critics of the Connecticut Juvenile Training School have called on lawmakers to close the facility for delinquent boys, saying youth -- especially with a history of trauma -- aren't being helped. 

VICTOR SUWATCHARAPINUN / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you stories from veterans and those in their community.

Adaptive athlete Earl Granville joined the Pennsylvania Army National Guard with his twin brother. He was medically retired from the Army after being hit by a roadside bomb in Afghanistan in 2008.

MarineCorps NewYork / Creative Commons

Wednesday is November 11, a date originally designated by President Woodrow Wilson as Armistice Day to mark the end of World War I. After World War II, however, it was renamed Veterans Day to honor all Americans who have served. 

Victor Suwatcharapinun / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR is highlighting stories from veterans and those in their communities.

Ben Cooper lives in Colchester and was a combat medic in World War II.

Victor Suwatcharapinun / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you stories from veterans and those in their community. 

Steven Bernier served in the U.S. Navy.

VICTOR SUWATCHARAPINUN / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you stories from veterans and those in their communities.

Peter Galgano served in the Vietnam War with the U.S. Marine Corps.  

Victor Suwatcharapinun / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you stories from veterans and those in their community.

Nick Vaughan served with the U.S. Marine Corps and is an Iraq War veteran. 

VICTOR SUWATCHARAPINUN / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you stories from veterans and those in their community.

Sean Connolly has a personal connection with veterans beyond his role as the Commissioner of the Connecticut Department of Veterans Affairs

Victor Suwatcharapinun / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you stories from veterans and those in their community.

Emily Hein is a member of the Connecticut Army National Guard. She served in Afghanistan. 

Tyler Russell CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you 11 of Us, stories from veterans and those in their community.

Adrian Gray is a veteran of the U.S Navy.

Victor Suwatcharapinun / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you stories from veterans and their communities.

Gil Sanborn is one of two people in the state who serves as a civilian aide to the Secretary of the U.S Army.

The Connecticut resident began supporting service members after the attacks on 9/11.

Victor Suwatcharapinun / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you stories from veterans and those in their communities.

Michael Zacchea is a retired Marine Lt. Colonel and Iraq War veteran.   

Victor Suwatcharapinun / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you stories from veterans and those in their community.

Diane DeLuzio had two sons who joined the military. 

Connecticut Commission on Children / cga.ct.gov

Connecticut was the first state in the nation to pass a law in 2014 that aims to help get kids ready for school by also focusing on their parents.

Victor Suwatcharapinun / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you stories from veterans and those in their community.

Edward Santos deployed twice to Afghanistan with the Connecticut Army National Guard.

Victor Suwatcharapinun / CPBN

In the days leading up to Veterans Day, WNPR brings you stories from veterans and those in their communities.

Gulaid Ismail is a veteran of the Iraq War.

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

This week, state lawmakers on the Juvenile Justice Policy and Oversight Committee will meet again to discuss child welfare issues in Connecticut. One of the questions before them is whether the state should continue operating its locked facilities for juveniles in Middletown. 

Dannel Malloy flickr.com/photos/governordanmalloy/5354974717 / Creative Commons

The spotlight has been on Connecticut's Department of Children and Families in recent weeks after troubling video showed DCF staff improperly restraining youths at the state's two juvenile detention facilities. Despite the latest controversy,  Governor Dannel Malloy remains supportive of the agency's commissioner.

ct.edu

The state Board of Regents approved a program that will allow community college students to earn an associate degree while pursuing their bachelor's degree after transferring into a Connecticut state college or university.

It's called the reverse transfer program. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil / WNPR

Vietnam-era veterans who have dealt with the consequences of getting a less than honorable discharge could now receive certain benefits.

The change comes after recent decisions by military boards under the Pentagon. 

Lucy Nalpathanchil

The Department of Defense estimates nearly one in five Afghanistan and Iraq War veterans has a brain injury along with other medical problems like PTSD and chronic pain. 

Some of those veterans must rely on their wives or mothers to be their caregivers. But a nationwide study finds more than half of these 1.1 million caregivers are balancing their new roles without any support. 

Foodshare

Summer vacation has started for most school children, and that means free summer lunch programs are also beginning across the state.

Trish Buchanan

Waterbury's Acting Deputy Police Chief, Chris Corbett, was laid to rest on Tuesday. He died from a self-inflicted gun shot wound last week.

It's not uncommon: each year, more police die by suicide than are killed in the line of duty. 

Creative Commons by Nate Grigg

This month, advocates for women's rights are marking the 50th anniversary of Griswold vs. Connecticut. In Connecticut, they gathered at the State Capitol to celebrate the legacy of the landmark court decision.

Brian Turner / Creative Commons

Connecticut's second-highest court has ruled that a transgender teenager's due process rights were violated when the state's child welfare agency sought her transfer to a prison last year.

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