WNPR

Lori Mack

Reporter

Lori is a reporter for WNPR.

She came to WNPR after working as News Operations Coordinator for WCBS Radio in New York City, covering stories for one of the nation's largest AM news stations. She went on to work as a reporter and afternoon news anchor with WWYZ and WATR in Waterbury, Connecticut. Lori also helped to start a morning drive show for the Fox News Radio Network in New York.

She lives in Branford with her daughter.

Ways to Connect

Rachel/flickr creative commons

The queen of slow cooking gives us Beer-Braised Brown Sugar Brisket with Bacon; Cajun Shrimp Chowder; Artichoke Chicken Lasagna; and Thai Peanut Butter Pork Roast. Throw the ingredients in a slow-cooker in the morning, and return hours later to a house full of comforting aromas. Honestly, it's like having staff! 

D. Sharon Pruitt/flickr creative commons

With scientific research, her own chemistry background, and the traditional diets of our not-so-distant ancestors as her guide, Dee McCaffrey casts new light on an age-old wisdom: Eating foods in their closest-to-natural form is the true path to sustained weight loss and, in fact, the remedy for almost any health problem. We are so far removed from foods in their natural state that we now call them “health foods,” a sad admission that we’ve compromised our health for the sake of convenience.

Robert S. Donovan/flickr creative commons

When blogger Jennifer Reese lost her job, she began a series of food-related experiments. Economizing by making her own peanut butter, pita bread, and yogurt, she found that “doing it yourself” doesn’t always cost less or taste better. In fact, she found that the joys of making some foods from scratch—marshmallows, hot dog buns, and hummus—can be augmented by buying certain ready-made foods—butter, ketchup, and hamburger buns. Tired? Buy your mayonnaise. Inspired? Make it.

Emily Carlin/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton

We celebrate a book that reminds us of what a great read can do to light up your life. Will Schwalbe, author of The End of Your Life Book Club, found a way to write about the books he and his mother read together as her life drew to a close. It makes you want to set aside a year to read what they did, because such wise and caring people have to reflect the stories they read. This is a tribute to the power of reading in our lives, the way it opens conversation, touches the deepest parts of ourselves, entertains and enlightens us. It turns out that The End of Your Life Book Club is very much about living in the best possible way.

Robyn Lee/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton

If your schedule is rushed, have we got a cookbook for you! The Good-to-Go collection of about 300 recipes is a winner with adults and children. It's also the perfect cookbook for transitioning kids in a first apartment, or for kids in college.

Miranda Granche/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton

Yale University Preventive Medicine expert Dr. David Katz says he has a four-step approach to keep disease away. His technique involves a change in diet, exercise, no smoking, and weight-control. Master the skill-set to bring these areas in line, and we'll have longer and healthier lives. If you believe genes play the leading roll, or that environmental factors mean we're probably going to die younger than we thought, Dr. Katz says he has data to show you otherwise.

flowercarole/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton  

Here's the mission—to inspire kids to cook and eat real food with their families. And we have the recipes to help you do just that. From French toast to frittatas, chicken soup to classic burgers, banana-peach frozen yogurt to mango lassis. 

Jack Newton/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton

Traditions can be fun and make life feel better. Join our brainstorming session to become inspired to start your own traditions, from apple-picking; the holiday party; the army buddy reunion; the Vermont Mud Race; to maple syrup on the first snow; and sampling away at The Faith Middleton Show's annual Martini Competition. (Do you know how strange it is to refer to yourself in the third person?)

paddy patterson/flickr creative commons

You know me—I love easy, delicious cocktails, and I have a festive seasonal sparkler this time to get your Thanksgiving rolling. Pair together cranberry juice, vodka and champagne, and your guests will be having too much fun to notice you forgot to defrost the turkey. Serve your drinks in chilled martini glasses; simply run your glasses under water, then pop them in the freezer for an hour or two, pulling each one out as you pour from your cocktail pitcher. Then you top off each glass with a splash of champagne, or an affordable dry sparkler, like a Spanish cava.

OC Always/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton

If you want to know how to act, our show is featuring free on-air acting lessons from Long Wharf Theater's award-winning artistic director Gordon Edelstein. Use Gordon's tips to gain acting chops.

Tabitha Kaylee Hawk/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton

Disturbia, as I call it, is the land where something or someone messes with your comfort zone. What people and things have disturbed your sense of comfort? Arguably, the Republican Tea Party's extreme wing is working hard and fast to make us understand Obamacare as a disruption of a way of life. This is genius as strategy since Obamacare is aimed squarely at those who have no health insurance and want to be made comfortable.

liz west/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton

Gather around book buddies. It's time to join in the hunt for books that will make life interesting. Whether you want escape, pleasure, thrills, wisdom, information, learning, or laughs, you'll hear about all kinds of good reads on our Book Show… Mysteries, Science, History, Comedy, Biographies, Thrillers, Memoirs, Politics, Food, Travel.

Justin Smith/flickr creative commons

What makes a chili unforgettable? When the meat and the right combo of spices are cooked slowly enough to make them melt into the sauce. This is the recipe that makes that happen, and the unsweetened cocoa powder addition is masterful, adding dark, dusky flavor.

Riley Kaminer/flickr creative commons

by Faith Middleton  

I learned to use a valuable tool for self-awareness at an Omega Institute workshop led by psychologist and mindfulness trainer Dr. Tara Brach. Please join us on the show to hear Dr. Brach explain a simple technique, known as RAIN, to recognize what your emotions are in any given moment, especially when thoughts and feelings are racing by. This quick, check-in method prevents us from storing up hurt, anger and frustration, or acting it out in a damaging way. 

Judy Sirota Rosenthal

by Faith Middleton  

Life is a difficult journey, despite its beauty, and that makes us wonder if artists are ahead of the game in using their creative expression to work through challenging times. We talk with nationally recognized artist Joy Wulke, who is now living with cancer, yet continuing to plan for her future.

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