WNPR

Lori Mack

Reporter

Lori is a reporter for WNPR.

She came to WNPR after working as News Operations Coordinator for WCBS Radio in New York City, covering stories for one of the nation's largest AM news stations. She went on to work as a reporter and afternoon news anchor with WWYZ and WATR in Waterbury, Connecticut. Lori also helped to start a morning drive show for the Fox News Radio Network in New York.

She lives in Branford with her daughter.

Ways to Connect

What happens if you cross meatloaf with pizza? You get Meatza… okay, you get food legend James Beard's "Hamburger Pizza," a dish that always delighted his party guests because his "pizza" had no dough. This dish put us in such a good mood, we decided to make up one of our own for parties. It rocks—because it includes a layer of Parmesan mashed potatoes under the tomato sauce and toppings.

We also have some holiday party wines to recommend (listed below), affordable wines for a crowd, and some bubbly for a dinner party or romantic dinner for two.

Abi Skipp/flickr creative commons

Huge question, but try asking yourself. The answer you give might surprise you.

Retirement planners, good ones anyway, have sometimes asked this kind of question of clients contemplating retirement—what do you want in retirement? The question—what do you want?—has a way of focusing the mind, erasing the blurry chatter in our heads. Suddenly, we're faced with the essential question. Want do we really want? To feel safe and secure? To love and be loved in return? Money? Connection? Friends? Power? Here's a big one—what about control?

Yukari/flickr creative commons

Today's show originally aired October 28, 2013.

Barking, fleas, Lyme disease, pet food, biting, housebreaking, shyness, pet insurance, animal rescue. Top flight advice from vet Dr. Todd Friedland. Don't miss his adventures with animals of all kinds.

Jason M Parrish/flickr creative commons

Faith's motto on The Book Show is… Life is short, but it can be ever so wide.

Join Faith and her book buddies for a call-in show recommending terrific books to read in all categories. If you're in a book club, please tell us what you've read and enjoyed.

Mark H. Anbinder/flickr creative commons

Want to make your holiday dinner or dinner party memorable and delicious? It's all about creating new flavor profiles for old standby dishes.Try our featured calorie-careful recipe for sweet and sour butternut squash, or, if you prefer, green beans with the ultimate treatment -- brown butter and toasted pecans, from an archive recipe in Fine Cooking Magazine.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

From Faith Middleton: More institutions of higher learning have shuttle busses to the nearest corporate high rises.

While it is understandable in a time of high unemployment to think about practical careers, it appears more people, including some entrepreneurial university administrators, think it's time to leave the “fluffy stuff” for hobby hour. That fluffy stuff would include literature, philosophy, languages, the arts and history—what we call the humanities. (Or, the stuff that hangs around long after we're dead.) Possibly the new rules of the road go something like this: read Michener before bed, and call it a day.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

From Faith Middleton: Wally Lamb's books beat with a human heart.

Many people, especially Wally Lamb's fans, recall that his first novel, She's Come Undone, was selected by Oprah's book club. But what I remember is the experience of riding in the New York subway, and seeing so many people bumping along, engrossed in his story. On one occasion, these subway readers, strangers to each other, started a discussion about the book—possibly the first underground book club. 

Contando Estrelas/flickr creative commons

Today's show originally aired October 22, 2013.  

Save money. Avoid long lines. Get better seats.

Check out our best travel tips conversation with Amy Farley, Travel Doctor columnist for Travel + Leisure magazine.

Rich Bowen/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: We think you deserve the very best pumpkin pie recipe to dazzle your family and guests. This is my favorite dazzler, from a 2009 Bon Appétit magazine, because this pie combines the spicy quality of pumpkin with just the right amount of caramelized brown sugar, cinnamon, and toasted walnuts. Think pumpkin pie, coffee-cake style! (And you know we love our streusel-topped morning coffee cake.)

saxcubano/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: A neuroscientist has been working on decoding the canine brain, to answer the question of what dogs are thinking and feeling. So, do they love us the way we love them? Does a rescued dog understand you have rescued it, and feel grateful in a specific sense?

Alex Proimos / Creative Commons

Time for a health checkup on Connecticut's health insurance exchange. What is working? What improvements are still needed? Tell Faith and her panel of health care experts how it worked for you. 

Abhi Sharma/flickr creative commons

Today's show originally aired September 12, 2013.

Faith's motto on The Book Show is… Life is short, but it can be ever so wide.

Join Faith and her book buddies for a call-in show recommending terrific books to read in all categories.

Kelly The Deluded/flickr creative commons

Fried Deviled Eggs
(From Southern Fried by James Villas) 
Serves 6

These melt in your mouth -- nicely seasoned traditional deviled eggs, dipped in bread crumbs, a little egg and flour, then fried in peanut oil to give them a crispy exterior.

Toshimasa Ishibashi/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: Neuroscientists are verifying that practicing mindful awareness promotes neuroplasticity in the human brain, activating the “resonance” circuit that leads to a greater sense of well-being.

Renowned mindfulness teacher Dr. Jack Kornfield explains how mindfulness works quickly to transform neural circuits, enhance inner and interpersonal attunement, and deepen the capacity for empathy and lovingkindness.

Timothy Faust/flickr creative commons

From Faith Middleton: How do we "curate" our own personalities—ditching self absorbed childish behaviors, yet maintaining a child-like sense of wonder about the world? Bruce Clements and I explore this human conundrum.

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