WNPR

John Dankosky

Executive Editor, NENC

John is Executive Editor of the New England News Collaborative, an eight-station consortium of public media newsrooms. He is also the host of NEXT, a weekly program about New England, and appears weekly on The Wheelhouse, WNPR's news roundtable program.

Previously, he was Vice President of News for CPBN, and Host of Where We Live,  twice recognized by PRNDI as America’s best public radio call-in show. You can also hear him as the regular fill-in host for the PRI program Science Friday in New York. He has worked as an editor at NPR in Washington, and reported for NPR and other national outlets on a variety of subjects.

As an editor, he has won national awards for his documentary work, and regularly works with NPR and member stations on efforts to collaborate in the public media system. As an instructor, John has held a chair in journalism and communications at Central Connecticut State University and been an adjunct professor at Quinnipiac University. He is also a regular moderator for political debates and moderated conversations at The Connecticut Forum , the Mark Twain House and Museum, The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center, The World Affairs Council of Connecticut and The Litchfield Jazz Festival.

John began his radio career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh, his hometown.

Ways to Connect

C-SPAN

We're halfway through week one of Donald Trump's presidency. So far, we've experienced Sean Spicer's "abnormal" press conference, an executive order to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, separate meetings with the President of Egypt and union leaders, another executive order to advance the approval of oil pipelines, and not one tax return

Jamelle Boule / Creative Commons

The inauguration is days away. Whether you're excited or not, the transfer of power from Barack Obama to Donald Trump is an historic event.  And an expensive event, at a price tag of more than $200 million. The Department of Homeland Security says they expect 900,000, including many protestors. While past Presidents like Bill Clinton, Jimmy Carter, and George W. Bush will be in attendance, more than fifty House Democrats say they will not attend

Pete Souza / White House

Last night night, President Obama delivered his farewell address to the nation. The speech was - let’s say, juxtaposed - with news that intelligence officials have briefed both Obama and President-Elect Donald Trump about reports that Russia had gathered “salacious” and compromising material about Trump. Although, it’s unclear what exactly counts as salacious anymore. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Wednesday is the start of Connecticut’s legislative session. Lawmakers reconvene, starting squarely at a massive state budget deficit, and a crisis in pension costs that Comptroller Kevin Lembo said will “crush us” unless something is done. 

jglazer75 / Creative Commons

The electoral college voted, and Donald Trump is still President-elect. But that big news paled in comparison to two terror attacks that posed direct threats to relations between European countries, Russia, Turkey and the conflict in Syria. 

Kevin Dooley / Creative Commons

The CIA released a report that Russia intervened in the election, findings that President-elect Donald Trump says are "ridiculous." It has many Americans wondering about the role of the electoral college. Could these electors actually vote to keep Trump out of the White House? The New York Times called that chance a “moonshot.” 

Jamelle Boule / Creative Commons

President-elect Trump. Sounds weird, doesn’t it.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

We’ve been talking a lot about national politics lately on the Wheelhouse. But there’s a LOT happening here in Connecticut. 

J Colman / Creative Commons

There are some weeks in the news when it seems like everything that’s been roiling and boiling in America comes to a head - all at once. A bombing in New York city - with other devices left unexploded - and a suspect in custody. The incident has once again prompted fears among America’s Muslim community, worried about backlash. 

Mike McGuire, as seen on 14th Street NW, Washington, DC // Creative Commons

Since last week's Wheelhouse, we had one candidate learn where Aleppo is, we heard one candidate refer to a "basket of deplorables," and we learned the same candidates campaign had been hiding a pneumonia diagnosis.

It’s the 25th anniversary of Connecticut’s income tax. Opponents of that tax will tell you lots of reasons why it’s hurt the state. Proponents will tell you that it’s a necessary tool to pay for government services. But one reality has really taken hold over the last few years.

City of Hartford

Is the city if Hartford facing Bankruptcy? This hour, we explore that question, and the future of the vacant ballpark. 

Mark Nozell, Creative Commons

We’re gonna try really hard to not say one word. That word starts with a T, and rhymes with “thump.” 

Marcie Casas / Creative Commons

A state senator is being investigated in Connecticut. That doesn’t sound surprising actually. This time, it’s about adding constituents who contacted his office about constituent stuff to political fundraising lists. Even in Connecticut that’s a no-no! 

U.S. Army / Creative Commons

Just when you think you've seen and heard it all, Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump gets into a public fight with Gold Star parents and their supporters. This hour, we take a closer look at that story with a panel of political experts and reporters. We also consider the impact of gender stereotyping in politics and discuss some of the other big headlines from this week's news. 

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