WNPR

John Dankosky

Executive Editor, NENC

John is Executive Editor of the New England News Collaborative, an eight-station consortium of public media newsrooms. He is also the host of NEXT, a weekly program about New England, and appears weekly on The Wheelhouse, WNPR's news roundtable program.

Previously, he was Vice President of News for CPBN, and Host of Where We Live,  twice recognized by PRNDI as America’s best public radio call-in show. You can also hear him as the regular fill-in host for the PRI program Science Friday in New York. He has worked as an editor at NPR in Washington, and reported for NPR and other national outlets on a variety of subjects.

As an editor, he has won national awards for his documentary work, and regularly works with NPR and member stations on efforts to collaborate in the public media system. As an instructor, John has held a chair in journalism and communications at Central Connecticut State University and been an adjunct professor at Quinnipiac University. He is also a regular moderator for political debates and moderated conversations at The Connecticut Forum , the Mark Twain House and Museum, The Harriet Beecher Stowe Center, The World Affairs Council of Connecticut and The Litchfield Jazz Festival.

John began his radio career at WDUQ in Pittsburgh, his hometown.

Ways to Connect

Cali4beach / Creative Commons

Last night saw the unlikeliest of upsets in Alabama. Democrat Doug Jones, propelled by a big turnout from the state's urban and suburban voters, very narrowly defeated Republican Roy Moore in a special election that could have big consequences in Washington - and even in Connecticut. 

Leave out for a minute any analysis of what this means as a referendum on Trumpian politics, or the race for congress in 2018, this win by Jones could mean that Republicans’ tax bill is in jeopardy. 

Olin Gilbert, creative commons

Allegations against Alabama Republican Roy Moore -- who is accused of sexual misconduct with minors -- don't seem to be stopping his bid for the U.S. Senate. On Tuesday, President Trump openly endorsed him, saying we should believe Moore because "he said it didn't happen." 

Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Attorney General - and former Senator - Jeff Sessions has spent more time on Capitol Hill than he’d like over the last few months, again facing tough questioning about what he did and didn’t know about contacts between Russia and the Trump campaign he was a part of. 

ABC News

Two famous Connecticut families have their names enshrined on buildings and roads. Both are back in the news for different reasons this week. 

Mamata.mulay / Creative Commons

We’ve been searching for months to find the right words to describe what’s it’s been like watching state lawmakers and the governor try to come together on a budget deal for the state. Senator Martin Looney, Democrat from New Haven has likened it to the process of having a prolonged tooth abscess that's finally being extracted. "A combination of exhaustion, pain, and relief," he said. 

Medill DC / Creative Commons

Republicans in Washington finally got closer to the goal they’ve had for about seven years - the repeal and replacement of Obamacare. Well, at least the repeal part.

Photo Phiend flickr.com/photos/photophiend/6045345789 / Creative Commons

All along, we knew it was all about the emails. We just didn't know it was going to be these emails. 

Carmen Baskauf, WNPR

Last year’s election was exhausting, for a lot of reasons. Not the least of which was the endless stream of narratives trying to explain the motivation of voters who, to be frank, seemed pretty pissed off. 

scyther5/iStock / Thinkstock

A special election in Georgia has been called the "most expensive, highest profile, most hyped special election" for a member of the U.S. House of Representatives. So with the Republican win, does it really tell us anything about the state of the electorate during the Trump administration? 

Michelle Lee / Creative Commons

There’s always a lot of last-minute action at the state capitol when the legislative session’s about to end. But in the middle of a budgetary crisis - that action has ramped up.

Jamelle Boule / Creative Commons

We started this week with revelations that President Trump -- while meeting with Russian officials in the White House -- spilled classified information from a Middle East ally, which we now know to be Israel. This was seen by Israel watchers as a breach of trust, which could endanger its intelligence personnel and increase a threat from Iran,  a close ally to Russia. 

Paul Morigi / Brookings Institution

On Tuesday night, President Trump fired FBI Director James Comey. The reason given? Comey's handling of the Hillary Clinton email scandal. Comey's job was praised by then-candidate Trump, and widely credited with helping to tip the election Trump's way. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Connecticut Governor Dannel Malloy will not seek re-election. The two-term Democratic governor announced his decision at a news conference Thursday afternoon at the Capitol in Hartford.

Secretary of State Rex Tillerson's meeting with his Russian counterpart, Sergey Lavrov, started with a warning to the U.S. - don't strike the Syrian regime again. 

Back home, the consensus among Connecticut's delegation in Washington is that President Trump should have informed Congress before sending missiles into Syria. 

creative commons

A leading economist said that Connecticut’s economy is in a “state of emergency.” This hour, we try to figure out if that's better - or worse - than Ben Barnes's "Permanent State of Fiscal Crisis."

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