WNPR

Jeff Tyson

Producer

Jeff Tyson is a producer for WNPR’s talk show Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil. He has produced shows on New England's opioid addiction crisis, the evolution of farming, rising waters along Connecticut's coast, and even a show on the history of boxing in the Nutmeg State.

Prior to joining WNPR, Jeff was a global development reporter for Devex in Washington, DC, covering the World Bank, education, global health and more. He has produced for NPR’s Weekend Edition, Morning Edition and Tell Me More with Michel Martin.

As a journalist, Jeff has gone door to door with Mormon missionaries in Harlem, profiled the young CEO launching Teach For Ghana and investigated whether the World Bank's Inspection Panel is working the way it should. He holds a master’s degree in journalism from Columbia University and a bachelor’s degree in International Relations and French from the University of Rochester.

You can reach Jeff at jtyson@wnpr.org and follow him on Twitter @jtyson21.

frankieleon / Creative Commons

Drug overdose deaths in Connecticut have surpassed the national average for several years now.

This hour, we talk with a former heroin addict about how he got into recovery — and his advice for others struggling with addiction. 

Jon Callas / Creative Commons

Hartford has long been known as the insurance capital of the world, but will that change now that insurance giant, Aetna, is moving its headquarters out of the state?

This hour, we examine the past and future of insurance in Connecticut — and beyond.

Dana Moos / Creative Commons

America’s national parks are experiencing record crowds — and some nature enthusiasts worry about what that means for the protected land. Is the sheer amount of people taking away the rustic experience these parks offer? 

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

Lawmakers in Hartford still have no state budget in place — and that’s creating widespread fiscal uncertainty for cities and towns across Connecticut.

This hour, we hear from municipal leaders about how they’re responding. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Hate drives people to do unspeakable things but how often do these stories end in forgiveness and friendship?

This hour, Ted Hakey Jr. and Zahir Mannan join us. The two men met after Hakey shot his rifle into Mannan’s place of worship — the Ahmaddiya Baitul Amman Mosque in Meriden in 2015.

Frédérique Voisin-Demery / Creative Commons

Many of us take it for granted that much of our food comes from seeds. But did you know 94% of our seed varieties have disappeared in the last century?

This hour, we talk with the co-director of the documentary SEED: The Untold Story. We find out how we lost a wealth of seed diversity and we learn about seed savers who are working to bring that diversity back.

NIAID / Creative Commons

It’s mosquito season and the Zika virus still remains a threat in many parts of the world — including here in the U.S.

This hour, we hear the latest on efforts to develop a Zika vaccine and we find out what researchers have learned since last summer about how the virus causes microcephaly in newborns. 

Sweet Chili Arts / Creative Commons

Environmental groups have drawn attention to sustainability and conservation, but insiders say movement leadership is overwhelmingly white.

This hour, we examine a lack of diversity in environmental activism and find out who’s working to change this.

Photo Courtesy Martin Podskoch / Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection

In the midst of the Great Depression more than 80 years ago, President Franklin D. Roosevelt created the Civilian Conservation Corps — giving jobs to young men to support their families, while conserving the country’s wild lands and upgrading our state parks.

This hour, we learn about the CCC’s impact in Connecticut and we hear from one “CCC boy” who is now 102 years old.

Muzeum Lubelskie w Lublinie / Courtesty of Stacey Fitzgerald

During World War II the Nazis experimented on Polish women among others at Ravensbrück concentration camp outside of Berlin. After the war, socialite and Connecticut resident Caroline Ferriday helped bring dozens of these women to the U.S. for medical treatment. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Oz Griebel has been at the helm of the MetroHartford Alliance — since 2001 — promoting economic development in the Greater Hartford region.

This hour, we sit down with Griebel — after his announcement he’ll step down from his role as President and CEO at the end of this year. We talk about the region, the state, and his hopes for the future.

NASA Goddard Space Flight Center / Creative Commons

President Trump announced last month the U.S. would withdraw from the Paris Climate Agreement — despite attention on the wide ramifications of climate change including its effects on where people can live.

This hour, we talk about why the phenomenon of “climate migration” has a global reach.

Francois Schnell / Creative Commons

According to the National Alliance on Mental Illness (NAMI), roughly one in five adults in the U.S. experiences a mental illness each year -- that’s approximately 20 percent of all American adults. But even as awareness increases, the stigma associated with mental illness persists.

Norman B. Leventhal Map Center / Creative Commons

Long before our modern highways, there was an extensive network of Native American trails up and down the East Coast.

This hour, we hear about efforts to map these old trails and find out how they’re helping archaeologists and others learn about the past. 

Mamata.mulay / Creative Commons

We’re inching closer to the end of the fiscal year and Connecticut lawmakers at the state capitol still haven’t been able to reach a budget agreement. Meanwhile at the nation’s capitol, Senate Republicans are postponing a vote on their controversial health care bill.

This hour: a tale of gridlock in Hartford and Washington. 

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