Jeff Cohen


Jeff Cohen is a proud New Orleans native who now calls New England home. Or at least his second home.

He started in newspapers in 2001 and joined WNPR in 2010, where he is a reporter and an occasional fill-in host for All Things Considered.

In addition to covering state and Hartford city politics, Jeff covered the December 2012 Newtown shootings and the stories that followed.  Much of that work was featured on NPR.  Also in 2012, Jeff was selected by NPR and Kaiser Health News for their joint Health Care In The States project. That work resulted in several national stories, including ones on the Affordable Care Act and medical education.

Jeff was also selected by the Tow Foundation and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice as a fellow in their 2012 juvenile justice reporting project.

Before working at WNPR, Jeff worked as the city reporter for The Hartford Courant.  While at the Courant, he won a National Headliner Award for a Northeast Magazine story about the ostracized widow of the state's first casualty in Iraq; wrote about his post-Katrina, flooded out home in New Orleans; and was part of a team of reporters that broke the stories of alleged corruption at Hartford City Hall that led to the arrest of former Mayor Eddie A. Perez. 

He also worked at the Meriden Record-Journal and as a freelancer for The New York Times.

Jeff lives in Middletown with his wife, cats, and two trouble-making kids. Thanks to the kids, he's now writing children's books. The first, Eva and Sadie and the Worst Haircut Ever!, came out in June 2014.  The second, Eva and Sadie and the Best Classroom Ever!, comes out in June 2015.  He likes to make bread and wine.

Ways to Connect

Heather Brandon / WNPR

In 2013, a public affairs firm made a strong accusation in court, claiming that a state-related agency rigged a public bid when it chose to do business with the firm of Tom Ritter -- a former Democratic House Speaker in the Connecticut legislature. Now, a state court judge has again weighed in, saying the antitrust claim doesn’t have merit. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

A one-time insurance executive who defrauded the city of Hartford, the state and others of over $2 million was sentenced to 78 months in federal prison Wednesday. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin took office in January, and his honeymoon is officially over. The mayor is trying to figure out a way to balance the city’s budget. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Thursday was supposed to be the home opener for Hartford’s new minor league baseball team, the Yard Goats. 

epSos .de / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s national distracted driving awareness month again, which means police will be out on the state’s roads and highways checking to see if you’re using your phone while you're driving. But it’s a targeted effort and not all police departments participate. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford HealthCare has opened a new addiction treatment center in Cheshire as part of an effort to battle opioid addiction in as many communities as possible. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

The federal Securities and Exchange Commission sent another subpoena to the city of Hartford in January, a sign that its investigation into the city and its treasurer is continuing. 

Twitter @GoYardGoats

Hartford officials are again asking legislators to pass a state law to help to pay for its new baseball stadium.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

When Luke Bronin was running to be Hartford’s mayor, he said he wanted to spend some time looking under the hood at the city’s finances. He’s done that now, and what he's seen isn't good. In advance of his state of the city address tonight, Bronin sat down with WNPR to share his take on the city's budget. 

Keoni Cabral / Creative Commons

The project to bring a bottled water facility to Bloomfield will be up for discussion at the State Capitol Friday.  There's a public hearing on a bill that would make it harder for bottling companies to get discounts on the public water they buy. 

mikael altemark / Creative Commons

A decision by the U.S. Supreme Court last week effectively limits the amount of healthcare claims information a state can gather. But one Connecticut official says the decision may not be the blow that many people think. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Tribune Publishing has shaken up the newspaper world with an announcement that it is getting rid of its publishers and giving that job to its editors. That means more responsibility for the leader at The Hartford Courant

James Gathany / CDC/ National Climate Assessment

State public health officials keeping an eye on the Zika virus say they now have the ability to test for it in-state. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin said the city has a $9 million budget shortfall this year, one that is projected to be three times that in the budget year to come without significant cuts. The mayor is beginning by making some immediate changes at city hall to try and save money. 

scyther5/iStock / Thinkstock

Roughly 8,000 people in Connecticut failed to pay their first month's premium for insurance under the Affordable Care Act.  And that means that they won't be covered under Obamacare this year. 

Keoni Cabral / Creative Commons

Residents opposed to a new Niagara water bottling facility in Bloomfield are holding a public meeting Thursday. They say the company and the town chose to keep the public out of the loop until it was too late. And they say public records back that up. 

Connor Tarter / Creative Commons

More than 116,000 people signed up for private insurance through Obamacare in the program's third year of open enrollment. 

Hartford Yard Goats / Facebook

When the city of Hartford needed land for its $350 million stadium and downtown development project, it couldn’t come to an agreement with a certain property owner on a price. So the city took some of the land it wanted by force, and decided to pay $1.9 million for it -- an amount its owner said was "wholly inadequate."

Now, the matter is in court, and the two sides are in front of a judge arguing over how much the city should actually pay. 

Cloud4Treasurer2015 / Facebook

Hartford Treasurer Adam Cloud will take four years to pay taxpayers back roughly $10,000 -- money he was given for a raise no one remembers approving.

Trombone Shorty

Troy Andrews has been playing the trombone since he was a boy, which is how he got the nickname he still uses: Trombone Shorty. This week, the New Orleans native is coming to UConn to perform.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

With rising concern about the spread of the Zika virus, Connecticut Senator Richard Blumenthal is calling for more federal funding for research into a vaccine, and said avoiding travel to affected regions isn't enough.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

A week after announcing a three-way deal to pay for $10 million in construction overruns at Hartford's new minor league baseball stadium, Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin held a town hall meeting with residents to talk about it. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Bankruptcy proceedings for the failed television venture called the Back9Network are continuing, and a federal judge said Monday that she would approve a plan to let the Hartford-based company borrow more money. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin has begun closed-door negotiating sessions with the stakeholders in the new, $56 million minor league baseball stadium that is neither on time nor on budget.

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford city Treasurer Adam Cloud said he will give back a $20,000 raise that neither the mayor nor the city council remembers approving.