WNPR

Jeff Cohen

Reporter

Jeff Cohen is a proud New Orleans native who now calls New England home. Or at least his second home.

He started in newspapers in 2001 and joined WNPR in 2010, where he is a reporter and an occasional fill-in host for All Things Considered.

In addition to covering state and Hartford city politics, Jeff covered the December 2012 Newtown shootings and the stories that followed.  Much of that work was featured on NPR.  Also in 2012, Jeff was selected by NPR and Kaiser Health News for their joint Health Care In The States project. That work resulted in several national stories, including ones on the Affordable Care Act and medical education.

Jeff was also selected by the Tow Foundation and the John Jay College of Criminal Justice as a fellow in their 2012 juvenile justice reporting project.

Before working at WNPR, Jeff worked as the city reporter for The Hartford Courant.  While at the Courant, he won a National Headliner Award for a Northeast Magazine story about the ostracized widow of the state's first casualty in Iraq; wrote about his post-Katrina, flooded out home in New Orleans; and was part of a team of reporters that broke the stories of alleged corruption at Hartford City Hall that led to the arrest of former Mayor Eddie A. Perez. 

He also worked at the Meriden Record-Journal and as a freelancer for The New York Times.

Jeff lives in Middletown with his wife, cats, and two trouble-making kids. Thanks to the kids, he's now writing children's books. The first, Eva and Sadie and the Worst Haircut Ever!, came out in June 2014.  The second, Eva and Sadie and the Best Classroom Ever!, comes out in June 2015.  He likes to make bread and wine.

Ways to Connect

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Tuesday is the day that Hartford’s new minor league Dunkin' Donuts Park is technically supposed to be done. On Monday, I took a tour. 

Heather Brandon illustration / WNPR

When it comes to understanding heroin and opioid deaths, data matters. But across the country, medical examiners and coroners vary widely in just how much information they provide on death certificates.

Steve Lyon / Creative Commons

A new study of recent police data finds significant racial disparities in traffic stops in some Connecticut police departments. In this third in a series of stories, WNPR has this report on the analysis that was released this week. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

The state of Connecticut is releasing new data this week on police traffic stops and racial disparities. In advance of that release, WNPR is taking a closer look at the interactions between police and the people they pull over.

In this second story in a series, we visited a police department that has taken a hard look at its numbers and made some changes.

Chris Yarzab / Flickr/Creative Commons

The state of Connecticut is releasing new data this week on police traffic stops and racial disparities. In advance of that release, WNPR is taking a closer look at the interactions between police and the people they pull over.

In this first story of a series, we speak with a man who is suing the Bridgeport police for an allegedly unlawful search. 

Centerplan Companies

The developers of the new minor league baseball stadium in downtown Hartford said they’ll be mostly finished with construction in two weeks, but the city's representative said that's unlikely. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Beth Ostrowski spends most of her day in her car.

Ines Hegedus-Garcia / Creative Commons

The city of Hartford and Trinity College have resolved a legal dispute over whether the school should be allowed to use artificial turf for new athletic fields. The move avoids a fight between a new administration and one of the city's biggest stakeholders.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR (file photo)

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin wants to close next year’s budget deficit by laying off 40 city employees, demanding millions in union concessions, draining every last dollar from the city’s rainy day fund, and not raising the tax rate. 

Heather Brandon / WNPR

In 2013, a public affairs firm made a strong accusation in court, claiming that a state-related agency rigged a public bid when it chose to do business with the firm of Tom Ritter -- a former Democratic House Speaker in the Connecticut legislature. Now, a state court judge has again weighed in, saying the antitrust claim doesn’t have merit. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

A one-time insurance executive who defrauded the city of Hartford, the state and others of over $2 million was sentenced to 78 months in federal prison Wednesday. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin took office in January, and his honeymoon is officially over. The mayor is trying to figure out a way to balance the city’s budget. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Thursday was supposed to be the home opener for Hartford’s new minor league baseball team, the Yard Goats. 

epSos .de / Flickr Creative Commons

It’s national distracted driving awareness month again, which means police will be out on the state’s roads and highways checking to see if you’re using your phone while you're driving. But it’s a targeted effort and not all police departments participate. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

Hartford HealthCare has opened a new addiction treatment center in Cheshire as part of an effort to battle opioid addiction in as many communities as possible. 

Jeff Cohen / WNPR

The federal Securities and Exchange Commission sent another subpoena to the city of Hartford in January, a sign that its investigation into the city and its treasurer is continuing. 

Twitter @GoYardGoats

Hartford officials are again asking legislators to pass a state law to help to pay for its new baseball stadium.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

When Luke Bronin was running to be Hartford’s mayor, he said he wanted to spend some time looking under the hood at the city’s finances. He’s done that now, and what he's seen isn't good. In advance of his state of the city address tonight, Bronin sat down with WNPR to share his take on the city's budget. 

Keoni Cabral / Creative Commons

The project to bring a bottled water facility to Bloomfield will be up for discussion at the State Capitol Friday.  There's a public hearing on a bill that would make it harder for bottling companies to get discounts on the public water they buy. 

mikael altemark / Creative Commons

A decision by the U.S. Supreme Court last week effectively limits the amount of healthcare claims information a state can gather. But one Connecticut official says the decision may not be the blow that many people think. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Tribune Publishing has shaken up the newspaper world with an announcement that it is getting rid of its publishers and giving that job to its editors. That means more responsibility for the leader at The Hartford Courant

James Gathany / CDC/ National Climate Assessment

State public health officials keeping an eye on the Zika virus say they now have the ability to test for it in-state. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Hartford Mayor Luke Bronin said the city has a $9 million budget shortfall this year, one that is projected to be three times that in the budget year to come without significant cuts. The mayor is beginning by making some immediate changes at city hall to try and save money. 

scyther5/iStock / Thinkstock

Roughly 8,000 people in Connecticut failed to pay their first month's premium for insurance under the Affordable Care Act.  And that means that they won't be covered under Obamacare this year. 

Keoni Cabral / Creative Commons

Residents opposed to a new Niagara water bottling facility in Bloomfield are holding a public meeting Thursday. They say the company and the town chose to keep the public out of the loop until it was too late. And they say public records back that up. 

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