WNPR

Heather Brandon

Digital Content Manager/Editor

Heather Brandon is digital content manager and editor for WNPR. She lives in Hartford with her husband and three children. Heather previously worked as a producer for Where We LiveThe Colin McEnroe Show, and news broadcasts. She created and authored the Hartford and Springfield blog Urban Compass, which focused on local urban development, politics, and community building.

Prior to writing the blog, Heather co-owned a graphic design and website development business, and founded and edited an all-volunteer youth 'zine.

Heather grew up in Pittsburgh and relocated to New England in 1994. She has a master's degree in public policy from Trinity College, and a bachelor's degree in Growth and Structure of Cities from Bryn Mawr College. 

Ways to Connect

Photo Phiend / Creative Commons

Connecticut legislators adjourned late Wednesday without passing a state budget or Governor Dannel Malloy's criminal justice bill. 

Illustration by Mary Lou Cooke for WNPR / Photos by Robert H. Goun and Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Preliminary voter turnout numbers are high for Tuesday’s Connecticut primary, which was won by the Republican and Democratic front-runners.

Illustration by Mary Lou Cooke for WNPR / Photos by Robert H. Goun and Gage Skidmore / Creative Commons

Donald Trump has swept the five Republican presidential primaries on Tuesday, including a win in Connecticut.

Hillary Clinton won the Democratic primary in Connecticut. She also won in Maryland, Delaware, and Pennsylvania. Bernie Sanders won in Rhode Island.

Andrew Ciscel / Creative Commons

What if commuting between Connecticut and Long Island meant hopping into a car and driving through a tunnel deep below Long Island Sound? Sounds far-fetched, right?

Well, if you're New York Governor Andrew Cuomo, you might not think so. And if you're Amtrak, you might think it shouldn't be cars driving under the Sound, but trains connecting the Northeast Corridor

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy seems to be at odds with his transportation commissioner over the issue of congestion pricing. It’s a way to discourage drivers from using highways, but its place in the state’s comprehensive transportation plan is uncertain.

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