WNPR

Harriet Jones

Reporter/Editor

Harriet Jones reports on all aspects of the business world for WNPR. She's covered such diverse issues as the threat to close Connecticut's submarine base, the sub prime mortgage crisis and the impact of casinos on the state.

In 2011, she created WNPR's Small Business Project as a way to tell stories about the companies that make up 90 percent of our economy, but often get overlooked in the media.

She is the winner of an Edward R. Murrow award for her reporting on Connecticut's 2010 floods.

Harriet joined WNPR in October 2000 as Morning Edition producer and reporter. Born in Scotland, she worked for the BBC for much of her early career.

She was news director at Scotland's largest commercial radio station, ScotFM, and was lucky enough to cover that country's two biggest political events in 300 years - the referendum which delivered a new parliament, and the subsequent elections.

She has also taught broadcasting for the BBC at some of their international schools in Eastern Europe, delivering courses to journalists in Romania, Albania and Bosnia.

Harriet lives in Stonington with her husband, Bob Statchen, and their three children.

Harriet Jones / WNPR

In a small church in one corner of Connecticut, a massive musical project has been underway this summer.

moodboard / Thinkstock

Governor Dannel Malloy’s latest executive order restores $40 million in funding to nonprofit providers of state services. 

neetalparekh via flickr.com / Creative Commons

Connecticut saw jobs growth slow significantly in July, according to the latest figures from the state Department of Labor. Preliminary monthly totals show the state lost 600 jobs in July, and its unemployment rate remained unchanged at five percent. 

Siri Stafford/Digital Vision / Thinkstock

Connecticut’s sales tax-free week goes ahead from this Sunday, despite the state’s continuing fiscal crisis. The Department of Revenue Services has estimated it will forgo about $4 million in sales tax during the course of the week.

UTC

Although it’s hard to tell who quit and who was fired, United Technologies’s CEO Greg Hayes did issue a statement Wednesday saying he was leaving President Donald Trump’s manufacturing council. 

ep_jhu / Creative Commons

Connecticut’s Wheeler Clinic is piloting a new outreach program aimed at cutting the rate of opioid addiction among teenage girls. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Rallies sprang up around Connecticut on Sunday in solidarity with the anti-Nazi protestors in Charlottesville, Virginia. Gatherings were held in West Hartford, Middletown, Waterbury, Deep River, New London, Torrington.Wilimantic, New Haven, Danbury, and Bridgeport. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Aetna CEO Mark Bertolini has a message for Washington, as the uncertainty over health care reform continues. 

Harriet Jones / WNPR

Barbara Deindorfer lives in North Stonington, Connecticut. The 52-year-old cares for her older brother John, who has severe intellectual disabilities. She became the full-time caretaker for her brother two years ago, when her mother died. 

David Wilson / Creative Commons

Connecticut seems no closer to a budget deal despite the adoption of a new labor concessions package. Meanwhile, the state’s towns and cities are still having to pay their bills.

CSIS / Creative Commons

The Commandant of the Coast Guard has spoken out in defense of transgender service members in the wake of President Donald Trump’s announcement that he would not allow transgender people to serve. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Connecticut Senate has given final legislative approval to a state employee concession deal, aimed at reducing the projected $5 billion state budget deficit by $1.5 billion over the next two years. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The Commissioner of Connecticut’s Department of Transportation says in the wake of the controversy over a proposed new rail bypass, he’s focusing on repairing the existing system to improve service. 

MMCT

Governor Dannel Malloy has signed into law a measure that would allow the state’s two federally recognized tribes to build and run a third casino. But the legislation looks certain to attract legal action.

Connecticut Senate Republicans / Creative Commons

After weeks of voting, unionized state employees have overwhelmingly approved a labor concessions package that's expected to provide $1.5 billion in savings for the over the next two years. 

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