WNPR

Emily Sullivan

For the first time since the Cold War, Hawaiians heard a nuclear attack warning siren test.

Siren tests for natural disasters like hurricanes are routine events in Hawaii, but on Friday, the Hawaii Emergency Management Agency added a new tone signaling nuclear threat.

The death toll in what Somalis have described as their 9/11 has risen even higher.

On Oct. 20, the government said the toll had reached 358, making it Somalia's deadliest terrorist attack ever. The Zobe Rescue Committee, created by the Somali government in the wake of the attack, spoke with relatives of those at the denotation sites in efforts to establish a more accurate death toll.

Now, the committee reports that 512 people were killed, 312 were wounded, and that 62 remain missing, according to The Associated Press.

Graduate students around the country walked out of their classes, office hours, and research labs to protest the House Republican tax plan Wednesday.

"This plan is going to be disastrous for higher ed," said Jack Nicoludis, a Harvard graduate student in chemistry, who helped organize a protest on the campus. He said the bill would more than double his taxes.

President Trump's speech at South Korea's National Assembly was meant to be a show of solidarity among the United States, South Korea and other Asian nations in the face of North Korea's nuclear ambitions.

Trump started by praising South Korea for its many achievements since the end of the Korean War in the 1950s, touching on technology, music, education and engineering.

Then, he arrived at golf.

Since the day he took office, President Trump's critics have been seeking more information about his company's lease to operate a hotel inside a taxpayer-owned building on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington, D.C.

They have tried asking for records but have gotten nowhere.

Hysteria. Panic.

Those were words reporters were using on this day 30 years ago to describe the stock market crash, now remembered as Black Monday.

Oct. 19, 1987, brought the single biggest one-day percentage drop in history — and yes, that includes the 1929 crash that presaged the coming of the Great Depression.

On that frightening Monday three decades ago, the Dow Jones industrial average plunged 508 points — more than 22 percent — to just over 1,700.

Just a few years ago, many car dealers and homebuilders were worried that millennials would forever want to be urban hipsters, uninterested in buying cars or homes.

But now, as millennials get older — and richer — more of them are buying SUVs to drive to their suburban homes.

The National Association of Realtors' 2017 Home Buyer and Seller Generational Trends study found that millennials were the largest group of homebuyers for the fourth consecutive year.