WNPR

Diane Orson

Managing Editor/Host

Diane Orson is WNPR's local host for Morning Edition.  She's also a reporter and managing editor for WNPR, as well as a contributor to National Public Radio. Her stories are heard on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Weekend Edition and Here And Now.  Diane began at WBUR in Boston and came to Connecticut in 1988 as a co-producer for Open Air New England.  She shared a Peabody Award with Faith Middleton for their piece of radio nostalgia about New Haven's Shubert Theater.  Her reporting has  been recognized by the Connecticut Society for Professional Journalists and the Associated Press, including the Ellen Abrams Award for Excellence in Broadcast Journalism and the Walt Dibble Award for Overall Excellence.

Diane is also an active professional musician. She lives in Hamden with her husband and two children.

Diane Orson

Federal authorities are investigating a complaint that Yale University has failed to adequately respond to allegations of on-campus sexual harassment and misconduct. Students describe a “sexually hostile” environment at the school.

Sixteen current and former Yale University students filed the complaint under Title IX, with the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights.

21-year old Yale student Alexandra Brodsky:

As jury selection continues for the second trial in the 2007 triple murder in Cheshire, the attorney who represented the first defendant is speaking out about his client’s case.  

Attorney Thomas Ullmann says zealous legal representation in all cases is a foundation of our criminal justice system.

"Its what differentiates our system of government and the protection of individual rights from many other countries."

Advocates for Latinos will gather in Hartford on Wednesday to talk with lawmakers about issues affecting the state’s Hispanic community. As WNPR's Diane Orson reports, 2010 census figures show a big jump in Connecticut’s Latino population.   

The number of Hispanics in Connecticut increased nearly 50 percent in the last decade. State Representative Andres Ayala:

After decades of fleeing to the suburbs, Connecticut’s residents are moving back into cities.  That’s according to redistricting data gathered during the 2010 census.  

New Haven gained the most residents in the past decade. Stamford added the most new homes of any city. Hartford’s population grew by 2.6%, only the second time that city’s seen gains since 1960. And Bridgeport’s population grew by 3.4%, it’s first gain since 1950.  

Nancy Eve Cohen

Record-setting snowfall and sub-zero temperatures in the Northeast have led to increased demand for firewood this heating season. There’s also been an uptick in complaints by consumers who say they’re getting less firewood than they pay for. As part of a collaboration with Northeast stations, WNPR’s Diane Orson reports. 

Northeast environmental reporting is made possible, in part, by a grant from United Technologies.

Diane Orson

Record-setting snowfall, sub-zero temperatures and treacherous travel conditions have meant plenty of missed school days this year.  Educators are worried that lost classroom time may affect preparation for standardized tests. 

State Department of Education spokesman Tom Murphy says he’s seen school closings, late openings and early dismissals in other years, "but this is really beyond what we’ve seen ever.  And it couldn’t happen at a worse time in our high schools, when we have our end of course exams" 

Diane Orson

New Haven Mayor John DeStefano says changes to city pension plans are urgently needed to keep from bankrupting the funds.  

He says New Haven is facing a growing budget gap.

"Over four years the next year this is a total budget gap of $309 million. The largest single expenditure item contributing to that gap is the increasing city contribution to our two pension plans."

East Haven’s Police Chief says he’s done his best to comply with all requests for information in connection with a federal investigation into alleged racial profiling by the town’s police officers.  

Eastern Washington University, Flickr Creative Commons

In his State of the Union address, President Obama called on higher education to reinstate the Reserve Officer Training Corps on college campuses. Many elite colleges and universities haven't had ROTC chapters since the late 1960s. But the end of Don’t Ask Don’t Tell could open the door. Most undergraduates at Yale University think its a good idea. 

Yale student Katherine Miller says President Obama’s message is clear. The military is becoming more inclusive. And that  means she’ll be able to pursue her dream of a career in uniform. 

The Freedom of Information Commission in Hartford is to hear testimony on Tuesday from the Former Police Chief of East Haven.  He’s been subpoenaed in connection with an investigation into alleged racial profiling by East Haven police officers.

Former Police Chief Leonard Gallo is expected to testify about documents related to a U.S. Department of Justice investigation into race-based violence, harassment and intimidation by East Haven police officers against Latinos.   

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The mood was electric as supporters waited to see the president. Bridgeport Mayor Bill Finch, Gubernatorial candidate Dan Malloy, and U.S. Senate candidate Richard Blumenthal warmed up the crowd, calling on voters to get to the polls and urge everyone they know to do the same on Tuesday.

Credit Greg Verdino/Flickr Creative Commons

It’s commencement weekend for many colleges and universities in Connecticut. Among them is Wesleyan University in Middletown, where there’s been a lot of talk this year about a subject that’s often buried in a culture of silence: campus sexual assault.

In the first of a series of stories on the issue, WNPR’s Diane Orson reports on how the university judicial process handled the case of a 2010 graduating senior named Eve, who’s asked that we not use her last name.

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