WNPR

Davis Dunavin

Davis Dunavin loves telling stories, whether on the radio or around the campfire. He fell in love with sound-rich radio storytelling while working as an assistant reporter at KBIA public radio in Columbia, Missouri. Before coming back to radio, he worked in digital journalism as the editor of Newtown Patch. As a freelance reporter, his work for WSHU aired nationally on NPR. Davis is a proud graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism; he started in Missouri and ended up in Connecticut, which, he'd like to point out, is the same geographic trajectory taken by Mark Twain.

The electric car company Tesla has convinced a handful of prime states, including Massachusetts and New York, to exempt it from laws that require car companies to sell through dealerships.

A new report by the Connecticut Coalition To End Homelessness says homelessness in the state is at an all-time low, with fewer than 4,000 homeless people in Connecticut since counts started in 2007.

Every year the Coalition does what’s called a point-in-time count, where they count all homeless people in the state on a given night.

A top federal prosecutor says the federal government has a lot more power to protect victims of cybercrime since the 2014 hack of Sony Entertainment, according to Assistant Attorney General John Carlin, who spoke to IT professionals at a cybersecurity conference in Stamford, Conn., on Monday.

A bill before the U.S. House of Representatives would designate Connecticut's lower Farmington River as “wild and scenic,” which means it would get federal funding and protection. Last week the U.S. Senate voted in favor of it, something advocates have wanted them to do for nearly ten years.

Ohio Governor John Kasich was in Connecticut again Friday, trying to reassure his supporters that he still has a chance to win the presidential nomination at the Republican convention in Cleveland.

UN Secretary-General Ban Ki-Moon spoke at Yale University on Tuesday. He called on universities and the international community to do more to protect ancient historic sites in the Middle East and north Africa from extremist groups, like ISIS.

Ban cited Palmyra in Syria and Timbuktu in northern Mali. Both areas have ancient historic sites. Both have been ravaged by extremist groups in the last few years. He also mentioned Bamyan in Afghanistan, where the Taliban destroyed two giant Buddha statues in 2001.

The Center for Family Justice officially opened on Monday in Bridgeport, Conn. It’s the first Family Justice Center model in the state, a specialized facility where victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse can go for a range of services, including free counseling from attorneys and police, all in one location.

Just over 200 years after Jesus died, in 240 A.D., someone made a wall-painting of a woman in a house in the ancient city of Dura Europos, now in modern Syria.

Almost seventeen centuries later, in the 1920s, Yale archeologists found the painting while excavating Dura. 

If you need romantic advice on Valentine’s Day, you might want to ask the longest-married couple in the United States. John and Ann Betar have been married for 83 years. He’s 104, she’s 100. 

In 2014, the state of Connecticut quarantined nine residents due to fears of Ebola. They’d just come back from Liberia, one of the countries at the center of the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, but they didn’t have Ebola. Eight of the nine are now suing the state in a lawsuit filed by students at Yale Law School.

U.S. Senator Chris Murphy of Connecticut said he’ll propose a bill that would pay to remove lead from homes and businesses.

Murphy says a tax credit would lower the chances of lead poisoning in Connecticut. In the northeast, lead was commonly used in for paint and pipes in houses built before 1950. The Connecticut Department of Public Health says about 15 percent of buildings in the state might still have lead in their paint or pipes.

The city of Bridgeport, Connecticut said it will make its financial information available to the public through a new website. The site, scheduled to be launched in the spring, will carry real-time information on the city’s revenue and its expenses.

This summer GE will move its corporate headquarters to Boston from Fairfield, where it’s been since 1974. But GE’s presence in Connecticut goes back almost 100 years. When GE bought one of its first factories in Connecticut in 1920, it wasn’t because of taxes or quality of life. It was because of the Russian Revolution.

The multi-national corporation General Electric announced they’ll move their global headquarters to Boston, Massachusetts, this summer. They’ll be leaving Fairfield, Connecticut, where they’d been based for more than 40 years. The local damage will go beyond the loss of 800 jobs.

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