WNPR

Davis Dunavin

Davis Dunavin loves telling stories, whether on the radio or around the campfire. He fell in love with sound-rich radio storytelling while working as an assistant reporter at KBIA public radio in Columbia, Missouri. Before coming back to radio, he worked in digital journalism as the editor of Newtown Patch. As a freelance reporter, his work for WSHU aired nationally on NPR. Davis is a proud graduate of the University of Missouri School of Journalism; he started in Missouri and ended up in Connecticut, which, he'd like to point out, is the same geographic trajectory taken by Mark Twain.

Environmental advocates say a planned natural gas pipeline in New England could cost ratepayers more than twice what’s currently projected. And they point to a study that says the pipeline could be unnecessary by as early as 2023.

Connecticut Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Commissioner Rob Klee says the state will continue to receive EPA grant money for its two largest projects. The announcement comes after President Donald Trump’s administration ordered the EPA to freeze its grant spending last week.

An apparently drunken Donald Trump supporter screamed racist profanity at children as they left school in Danbury, Connecticut, just after the inauguration Friday. Over the weekend a video of the incident appeared in a short video posted to Twitter.

A local Republican lawmaker in Greenwich, Connecticut, has been arrested and has garnered national attention for an alleged sexual assault.

Christopher Von Keyserling was charged with fourth degree assault after police say he pinched a female town worker’s genitals during a political argument.

Von Keyserling and the worker were at a town building in December when Von Keyserling allegedly called the worker a lazy, bloodsucking union employee and said, “I love this new world. I no longer have to be politically correct.”

One of the major symptoms of schizophrenia is hearing voices – but people who believe they’re psychic also hear voices. A team of Yale psychologists thinks there’s a connection. Their new study takes an unorthodox approach to understanding mental illness.

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