WNPR

David DesRoches

Reporter

David finds and tells stories about education and learning for WNPR f.m. and dot org. He also teaches journalism and media literacy to high school students, and he starts the year with the lesson: “Conflicts of interest: Real or perceived? Both matter.” He thinks he has a sense of humor, and he also finds writing in the third person awkward, but he does it anyway. 

He's won some awards. He's lost some, too. Winning is better, but neither really matter. What matters is the work. Here are some of his stories that matter: special education; toxic PCBs in schools; hate crime; environmental damages

When he was a kid, people told him life isn't fair. He still doesn't buy it. Consequently, he could be biased toward fairness, which manifests in different ways, such as fighting inequality and inequity. He is an activist for truth and for transparency. He tries to paraphrase smart mentors but he often paraphrases Jeffrey Lebowski instead. If you have a problem with his stories or his bias, talk to him. Call him out. If you’re right, he’ll be better for it. If you’re wrong, you at least got something off your chest. 

His true passion is music. It’s in his veins, always there. Kurt Vonnegut, a lifelong atheist, once said that “…virtually every writer I know would rather be a musician,” and that “music is the proof of the existence of God.” It turns out, a lot of journalists are musicians. If they’re not, they’re likely huge music fans. David's both. He also loves to cook, woodwork, write fiction (never for WNPR) and will probably continue writing about his trip to Ethiopia for his entire life (it was over ten years ago).

He loves being in the studio and being creative with sound. Radio is right up his alley. He enjoys telling people’s stories, holding the powerful to account, FOIA’ing and data diving, eating poorly and trying to find words to end this bio. How about an onomatopoeia? Bam. 

Ways to Connect

timlewisnm / Creative Commons

Connecticut officials praised the latest 11th grade SAT scores, saying that the state is further closing the achievement gap. But many students from the state's poorest performing districts remain far behind their high-achieving peers from other parts of the state.

ccarlstead / Creative Commons

The NAACP has published a paper that's heavily critical of charter schools. The civil rights group visited New Haven as part of a national listening tour, hearing from all sides of the charter school debate.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Enid Rey is a nationally recognized figure for her work managing and promoting the school choice program for Hartford Public Schools. It’s a lottery-based system that, among other things, tries to pull in white and Asian students from the suburbs into Hartford. But earlier this month, Rey announced her resignation after about six years at the post.

David DesRoches/WNPR

On a muggy July afternoon, Sheena Harris is teaching about the creolization of African people during the years of slavery.

Child Health and Development Institute of Connecticut

As Connecticut lawmakers decide where to cut state spending, advocates for early childhood education are concerned that the state could lose millions of dollars in long-term benefits if quality child-care remains on the chopping block.

Matthew / Creative Commons

A group of educators have proposed a plan to hire more teachers of color in Connecticut public schools.

Photo Phiend flickr.com/photos/photophiend/6045345789 / Creative Commons

Connecticut House Democrats said they've come up with a two-year budget proposal that could be ready for a vote on July 18.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

High school English class is usually a time to read books and write essays. If you draw pictures, you might get into trouble. But not in James Shivers’s English class at CREC Public Safety Academy in Enfield -- he actually asks his students to draw.

U.S. Navy

The community of Watertown, Connecticut is mourning the loss of Tan Huynh, who was among seven U.S. Navy sailors who died when their destroyer collided with a merchant ship off the coast of Japan on Saturday. 

Jacqueline Rabe-Thomas/CT Mirror

A judge has temporarily halted the state’s plan to allow more minority students into Hartford-area magnet schools. The decision came after a three-day court hearing in the ongoing Sheff vs. O’Neill case.

Jacqueline Rabe-Thomas/CT Mirror

Martha Stone is a lawyer for the plaintiffs in the Sheff v. O'Neill case, which settled over 20 years ago. She said the state's current position threatens to harm Hartford students. 

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

The long-running Sheff vs. O’Neill school desegregation case heads back to court this week. 

David DesRoches/WNPR

It's known at the "summer slide" in education circles. It's what happens during summer break when students forget what they learned during the school year. But for students on the autism spectrum, the summer slide can also mean losing hard-won social skills, and that can make it especially difficult once school starts again.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Here's how journalist Gabrielle Emanuel described having dyslexia.

"I've come, very recently, to kind of think about it as a tongue twister, but for the brain," Emanuel said on WNPR's Where We Live. 

Sam Greenhalgh / Creative Commons

Dyslexia is considered the most common learning disorder and yet it is often undiagnosed and rarely understood.

This hour, we look to better understand the dyslexic mind.

Pages