Chion Wolf

Producer/Announcer/Photographer

Chion Wolf is a producer, announcer, and photographer for WNPR and the Colin McEnroe Show.

She co-produces The MOuTH - a live storytelling event at the Mark Twain House & Museum in Hartford. She is also an actor and on the Board of Directors for Night Fall, Inc., a yearly Hartford-based public performance with Anne Cubberly's giant puppets, dancers, and music.

Wolf is a founding member of the Hartford-based marching band, the Hartford Hot Several, where she plays the trash can bass drum. Chion is also a certified judge with the International Chili Society, and is unapologetic about her love for onions.

Click here to visit "Wolfie's Songs" from the Colin McEnroe Show.

Click here for the WNPR Flickr page.

Click here for the WNPR Video page on YouTube.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:22 am
Wed December 25, 2013

Christmas Songs That We Love to Love and Hate

Joan Holliday (file photo).
Chion Wolf WNPR

There are some holiday songs that should banned. I'm sorry, Burl Ives, but there's really no reason for anybody to have to hear "Holly Jolly Christmas" ever again.

And Little Drummer Boy? There's almost no way to describe the sinking feeling that tune gives me. Except, well, to call it a sinking feeling. On the other hand, I don't mind Mariah Carey singing "All I Want for Christmas Is You," but my producers are pretty much coming though the glass of the control booth at me for saying that.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:34 pm
Mon December 23, 2013

Scrambling Toward Christmas With Sad Songs, Oscar Isaac, and Tight Flights

Oscar Isaac plays Llewyn Davis in the Coen Brother's new film, "Inside Llewyn Davis."
Credit Mongrel Media Press Photos

A couple of weeks ago, we did a whole show about blood pressure only to have an article in The Journal of the American Medical Association blow a lot of the current thinking about blood pressure right out of the water. We talk to UConn's hypertension expert, Dr. Billy White, about new guidelines saying people over 60 may not need to keep their blood pressure as low as previously thought. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:07 am
Fri December 20, 2013

The Nose Blows for Duck Dynasty, Netflix Adultery, and More

Jim Chapdelaine.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Here are the topics for The Nose today -- and this week we had to throw out a lot of perfectly good ones because there were so many:

We pretty much have to tackle the controversy around Duck Dynasty. One of the real life characters in the reality TV show gave an interview in which he aired his strong religious views, which included multiple denunciations of homosexuality as a sin.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:01 am
Thu December 19, 2013

Paying Homage to Pigs!

Colin meets Rosie.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Behold! The unique dilemma of the pig: There is nothing that smart that tastes that good. Is it true they're as smart as dogs? Why do some religions require people abstain from eating pork? What's it like raising pigs, and what parts of the pig are overlooked when it comes to eating them?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:28 am
Wed December 18, 2013

Daniel Menaker's Journey Through the Hallowed Halls of The New Yorker

Daniel Menaker.
Credit Daniel Menaker

If you read magazines and live on the North half of the East Coast there is a good chance that you believe that The New Yorker is the ne plus ultra of magazine writing and if you believe that there's a good chance you run around using phrases like ne plus ultra.

With The New Yorker's Olympian status goes a certain preciousness One of the reasons there's nothing else quite like The New Yorker is The New Yorker deeply believes that to be true and communicates it to us in subtle ways. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:41 am
Tue December 17, 2013

How Do We Determine the Value of Art?

A Jeff Koons red balloon flower
Credit Wikimedia Commons

A Francis Bacon triptych, "Three Studies of Lucian Freud" sells for $142.4 million.

Jeff Koons work sells for $58.4 million, making it the most expensive art by a living artist to sell at auction.

Is any art really worth this much or do a few wealthy investors artificially drive up the market to divert the rest of us from the reality of overall declining sales. If art is not worth as much as certain vested interests want us to believe, how do we determine the real worth of art?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:38 am
Mon December 16, 2013

Monday Scramble: Peter O'Toole, Jameis Wilson, and Joan Fontaine

Peter O'Toole in "Lawrence of Arabia"
Credit LAPhotographer on Flickr Creative Commons

This is the Monday Scramble, the show we assemble on very short notice to challenge ourselves and keep things fresh.

Two film icons died over the weekend, Peter O'Toole and Joan Fontaine. Attention gravitated to O'Toole because of his larger than life roles and his larger than life off-screen behavior. We'll be talking about O'Toole with one of his co-stars and with a director but we didn't want to ignore Fontaine, famous for her Oscar-winning role and for her decades-long feud with her sister, Olivia DeHaviland. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:56 am
Fri December 13, 2013

The Nose Sniffs Out the Controversy Surrounding Housework, Smarm, and More

Irene Papoulis is a lecturer in Writing and Rhetoric at Trinity College
Chion Wolf

After a two-week hiatus, The Nose, our weekly cultural panel, is back on with discussions of a controversial New York Times essay about who does housework, a contemplation of smarm versus snark, a nod to all the messiness around Nelson Mandela's funeral, and some second-guessing of Time's Person of the Year, Pope Francis or Ed Snowden.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:03 am
Thu December 12, 2013

A Swig of "Christmas on the Rocks"

Harry Bouvy is a stage, film, television, and voice over actor.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Today we're talking about the afterlife of characters from classic Christmas stories. What happened, in later years, to Ralphie from "A Christmas Story" or Susan Walker from "Miracle of 34th Street" or Charlie Brown or Clara from "The Nutcracker?"

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:23 am
Wed December 11, 2013

Singing Away the Blues

Lucy Ferriss is a writer-in-residence at Trinity College and author of several books, including the forthcoming, The Map of Honor. She also sings with CitySingers choir.
Chion Wolf

I suppose you could say that today's show is about a fairly obvious truth--singing with other people feels good. 

But, it's a little bit more complicated than that. When you go to a church and pick up a hymnal and sing what everybody else sings, it feels okay. And, a fairly complex set of activities takes place in your brain, and that's nice, but it pales in comparison to really singing with others. 

That is, getting together with other people and rehearsing and working toward a truly successful blend of voices.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
12:44 pm
Tue December 10, 2013

Tuesday Tumble: Eddie Perez, "Rent" in Trumbull, Snowy Owls and the Ivory Trade

Steven Seligman is an attorney in Hartford
Chion Wolf

The Connecticut town of Trumbull, and especially its thespian society, has become a familiar name in the theater world, but maybe for the wrong reasons. When the high school principal decided to cancel the thespian society's production of "Rent," the story went national. It has bubbled along for weeks and as of today, we may have news about a compromise that would allow it to be staged.

Meanwhile, former Hartford Mayor Eddie Perez has been awarded not one, but two new trials. We'll have an expert here to explain how that's likely to play out. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:37 am
Fri December 6, 2013

Bringing Back Boy Bands: Did They Ever Really Leave?

The Monkees made music that drove their fans wild between 1966 and 1970. They continued to make music individually and in reunion with one another for many more decades.
Credit Nico7Martin on Flickr Creative Commons

The Monkees were the first group to exhibit all or most of the qualities we now associate with the term "boy band." They were assembled through auditions. They had a set of visual styles imposed on them. They were incredibly popular with tween-aged girls. They were plagued by the accusation that there was less to them than meets the eye. That last accusation was false, by the way.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:47 am
Thu December 5, 2013

Preserving the Moon and Protecting Its Rocks

Astronaut Eugene Cernan salutes deployed U.S. flag on the lunar surface
Credit NASA Goddard Center on Flickr Creative Commons

Neil Armstrong was the first man to walk on the moon, but the first man to urinate there was Buzz Aldrin, just a little ahead of Neil. The two astronauts relieved themselves into bags within their suits, then removed those bags and left them on the lunar surface. When you gotta go, you gotta go. It was time to go. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:01 am
Wed December 4, 2013

Blood Pressure is One Measure of Future Cardiovascular Disease

Dr. Paul Thompson, Chief of Cardiology at Hartford Hospital
Chion Wolf

Long before we knew how the cardiovascular worked, ancient doctors may have recognized what we call hypertension. It seemed like maybe there was too much blood, so they treated it with leeches. 

Even today, high blood pressure is a little bit mysterious. The way it's typically measured may be the wrong way. And, it's not caused by one single factor so no single drug treats all the things that cause high blood pressure. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
3:32 pm
Mon December 2, 2013

Colin Quinn Takes On The Constitution

Colin Quinn in his new show, "Unconstitutional".
Credit Mike Lavoie.

There aren't that many jokes in the US Constitution. Either that, or there are too many, and they're all on us. Comedian Colin Quinn says most of you have never even read it. Who's gonna read something four pages long in this day and age?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:50 am
Mon December 2, 2013

The Scramble: Metro-North, the "Globalization of Indifference," and Kurt Weill

Kurt Weill is a German composer who emigrated to the United States in 1935, at the age of 35, to escape persecution in Nazi-led Germany. He is considered one of the most important composers of the 20th century.
Credit Kevin Dooley / Creative Commons

Metro-North has had a tough year. Yesterday's derailment in the Bronx follows the May derailment in Bridgeport that injured more than 70 people, the death of a rail worker repairing tracks in West Haven one week later, the July derailment of a freight train that occurred about 1,700 feet from Sunday's derailment, and a nearly two-week power outage in September that severely disrupted rail traffic.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
3:59 pm
Tue November 26, 2013

Will the Real Norman Rockwell Please Stand Up?

Norman Rockwell.
Credit Wikimedia Commons

Norman Rockwell. It's the day before Thanksgiving. Who else are we gonna talk about? Deborah Solomon (the same one who invented the "Questions for" format in the New York Times magazine) will spend the whole show talking about her new comprehensive biography of Rockwell.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:27 am
Tue November 26, 2013

The Dark Side of Zen

Golden Palace Kinkaku-ji, Zen Buddhist Temple, Kyoto, Japan
Credit Carles Tomas Marti on Flickr Creative Commons

Here in the West, Zen Buddhism is often where you go when you've concluded the religion you grew up with is marred by venality, hypocrisy, misogyny, patriarchal structure, and an insufficient commitment to peace and love. 

Buddhism seems to have less hierarchy and more commitment to pure enlightenment and oneness. So, what do Buddhists do when Buddhism falls down on the job?

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:18 am
Mon November 25, 2013

Catching Fire, Culture, Condoms, and the Law

Can Bill Gates inspire inventors to make a condom that's stronger, thinner, and more sensitive?
Credit Robert Elyov on Flickr Creative Commons

Why should sex feel bad? It shouldn't, and Bill Gates is offering $100,000 to the inventor of a condom that puts the pleasure back in sex. And, it isn't just about pleasure. Scientists at the University of Manchester's National Graphene Institute say a "redesigned condom that overcomes inconvenience, fumbling, or perceived loss of pleasure would be a powerful weapon in the fight against poverty."

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:36 am
Fri November 22, 2013

The Nose Pays Tribute to Melodrama

Irene Papoulis teaches in the Allan K. Smith Center for Writing and Rhetoric at Trinity College
Chion Wolf

Today, on The Nose, well we can't entirely ignore the 50th anniversary of the Kennedy assassination, but the subject is so vast we can only break off one little part. We're going to focus on an essay by Adam Gopnik and published in The New Yorker a couple of weeks ago. Gopnik probes the question of exactly what changed as a result of the crime and its murky aftermath. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
5:27 pm
Thu November 21, 2013

The Agony and Utility of Ecstasy

C. Michael White is a Professor and Department Head at UConn’s School of Pharmacy.
Chion Wolf WNPR

"Molly" is the nickname for MDMA, or Ecstasy, and it's short for "Molecule", meaning you're getting the "real thing", chemically speaking. Except you almost never do. On this show, we'll talk about the dangers of Molly, the medical uses of MDMA, and the curious romance between the drug and the form of music known as EDM, Electronic Dance Music.

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You Shall Not Pass!
4:19 pm
Wed November 20, 2013

Hartford Resident Sues to Reopen Flower Street

Joshua LaPorte, CT State Senator John Fonfara, Christopher Brown, and Attorney Ken Krayeske.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Christopher Brown is a cyclist in Hartford, and he's suing the Connecticut Department of Transportation for closing Flower Street. Brown described the street as "a crucial North/South route for safe bike and pedestrian travel between Capitol and Farmington Avenues." 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:45 am
Tue November 19, 2013

Harmonica Heroes Take Over WNPR

Don DeStefano's harmonica case.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Are there countries where harmonica players are BIG stars? Why don't more women play it? How many different musical styles can you squeeze out of one of these things? Guests include a lot of the pros: Howard Levy, Don DeStefano and Chris DePino whose odd career arc has taken him from railroad conductor to chairman of the Connecticut Republican Party to professional harmonica player. Also, Wolfie gets an on-air harmonica lesson from these gods of the harp.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
9:57 am
Mon November 18, 2013

Dealey Plaza, Same-Day Voter Registration, and Chess

Dealey Plaza in Dallas, the site of the assassination of President John F. Kennedy
Credit Stu Seeger on Flickr Creative Commons

Why do we visit historical sites? Commentator Mike Pesca wants to talk  about the value of seeing a place, especially one like Dallas' Dealey Plaza about which arguments have raged for decades. Mike says there's a difference between watching a NOVA special and walking through the place with your own eyes open.

Paul Bass, from the New Haven Independent, will bring us up to speed on three stories, including one from the weekend about a stretch limo that transported women to and from a drug and alcohol treatment center so they could vote on Election Day.  You can link to it here.

And, we'll connect with Susan Polgar, the chess Grandmaster who broke the game's gender barrier. She's in Chennai, India, covering the match between Carlsen and Anand, the first chess championship in decades to cross-over and ignite the players. 

You can leave your comments below, email us at colin@wnpr.org, or tweet us @wnprcolin.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
11:01 am
Fri November 15, 2013

The Nose is (Really) Not Racist

Elizabeth Keifer is a Professor of English at Tunxis Community College
Chion Wolf

Here's the plan for The Nose today. We'll begin with a widely discussed column by Richard Cohen of The Washington Post who took an odd detour from a discussion of Chris Christie's national electoral profile and suggested that conventionally-minded people have to repress a gag reflex when confronted with the sight of an inter-racial couple, specifically the new first family of New York City. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
6:00 am
Thu November 14, 2013

Are We Born Moral?

Shanell Smith is an ordained minister and assistant professor of New Testament and Christian Origins at Hartford Seminary
Chion Wolf

In 1965, the Yale psychologist Stanley Milgram, spread stamped and addressed but un-mailed letters around public locations in New Haven. Most of the letters were picked up and mailed by strangers who could not possibly derive any material reward for doing the right thing. The strangers also lived out their values based on the address.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:54 am
Wed November 13, 2013

A Tribute to the Proud and Peaceful Pigeon

Pigeons have been both reviled and revered for over 5,000 years
Credit zigazou76

B.F. Skinner thought pigeons were so smart they could be used to guide missiles during WWII. He proposed a system in which pigeons would essentially pilot the missile. Skinner said pigeons could be trained to peck at a screen to adjust the trajectory of a missile toward its target. Project pigeon was funded but never used. It's one of the many reasons I could talk about pigeons all day. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:02 am
Tue November 12, 2013

When Will CBS Do More Than Apologize?

Credit Planeta on Flickr Creative Commons

Once again we start the week with a show that we planned on the fly based on stories that grabbed us over the weekend. 

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:35 am
Fri November 8, 2013

The Nose Tackles Racism, Past and Present

Tracy Wu-Fastenberg is the Director of Development at The Mark Twain House and Museum.
Chion Wolf WNPR

As my friend Alex Beam said today, 12 Years a Slave has a way of taking things that were abstractions and making them real. It's one thing to talk about abolition, another to see the essential need for it. Even a figure like John Brown, says Alex, looks different when you see the true carnage of slavery.

We're talking about this astonishing new Steve McQueen movie today on The Nose and we'll find it pretty easy I predict.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:46 am
Thu November 7, 2013

Can The Humanities Be Saved?

Credit Wikimedia Commons

This show originally aired on July 2nd, 2013. When considering what show we wanted to re-run, we found this recent article from the New York Times, As Interest Fades in the Humanities, Colleges Worry. The debate is still being discussed and on this show, it gets heated!

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