Catie Talarski

Executive Producer

Catie Talarski is Executive Producer at WNPR, focusing on original WNPR programs; working to develop new concepts, live events and content strategies, with concentration on three pillars: Talk Programming, Community Outreach, and Education.

Catie got her start in documentary radio at the Salt Institute in Portland Maine. She has produced several PRNDI award-winning programs on Where We Live, including coverage of young people leaving Connecticut and Sexual Assault on College Campuses. In honoring her award-winning 2010 episode about what makes a good neighbor, PRNDI judges wrote that Where We Live “takes a news story and spins it into universal connections for listeners. This program is an inspiring example of how talk programs can take the ordinary and make it extraordinary.”

Catie’s also documented end-of-life decisions made by young people with Cystic Fibrosis for NPR’s Hearing Voices, and dug into archival tape of artist Romare Bearden for Studio 360. For WNPR, she’s explored the underbelly of Hartford’s Park River, and the history of the women who helped save the Mark Twain House. She worked with the Public Radio Exchange to produce the hour-long specials BULLIED: Teen Stories from Generation PRX and Left Behind, Dropping Out.

Her foray into magazine writing includes an article about her Polish heritage published in SilverKris, the in-flight magazine of Singapore Airlines.

Catie was inspired by Third Coast and others to create live events to build community around radio. She launched *the ear cave* a listening session hosted by a rotating cast of local radio professionals held at a coffeehouse in Hartford. And her Radio Adventure Theater is an experimental variety show that combines live music, theater, poetry and documentary radio. You can follow Catie on Tumblr and Twitter.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu March 27, 2014

Where We Teach: A Conversation With Connecticut's Teachers

WNPR's John Dankosky moderates a discussion with teachers Liz Natale, David Bosso, Ebony Murphy-Root, and David Low.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Our teacher panel welcomed educators from across the state. We broadcasted live from the CPBN Learning Lab, the home of the Journalism and Media Academy Magnet High School Satellite Campus and the Institute for Advanced Media.

Are you a teacher? Why did you decide to enter this profession and what keeps you going back to school every day? Find our tweets from the discussion at #WhereWeTeach, and watch our video of the event below.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Wed March 26, 2014

The Wheelhouse: Legislative Deadlines, Money In Politics, and Common Core

There are six weeks left in the legislative session.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Key deadlines are coming up for some proposed legislation at the state capitol and some have already passed. On our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we talk about what bills may or may not make it out of committee.

We also discuss the role of money in this year’s statewide elections. Common Core remains in the national headlines, with Indiana actually dropping the standards.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Tue March 25, 2014

A Look Inside Connecticut's Family Court System

Credit AndreyPopov/iStock / Thinkstock

Earlier this month, The Connecticut Law Tribune reported that a number of the state’s guardian ad litem lawyers had withdrawn from their child custody cases. Their actions came in response to growing tension within the family courts, where parents and advocates have criticized the system -- and the lawyers in it -- for high fees and lack of oversight.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Mon March 24, 2014

Checking In With Senate President Don Williams and House Speaker Brendan Sharkey

Senate President Don Williams and House Speaker Brendan Sharkey
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Today, conversations with Connecticut’s top two lawmakers - Senate President Don Williams and House Speaker Brendan Sharkey - about two big issues: Freedom of Information and taxes.

Williams has announced his retirement after 20 years in the legislature after this session ends. We talk about his tenure, which included the aftermath of the scandal that sent Governor John Rowland to jail. And about his testimony over proposed legislation that would limit access to public records.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri March 21, 2014

Remembering Ireland's Great Hunger; Asylum Saxophone Quartet

Irish Peasant Children, Daniel McDonald (1847)

This week, we celebrated St. Patrick’s Day, even if we aren’t Irish.

But sadly, this holiday meant to celebrate a heritage doesn’t really go too much deeper than green beer and shamrocks in the public consciousness.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu March 20, 2014

Ukraine Crisis and Russian Relations: Chris Murphy Discusses Recent Trip to Kiev

Chris Murphy joined other U.S. Senators on a trip to Kiev, Ukraine last weekend.
Sen. Chris Murphy Twitter

For the second time in recent months, Senator Chris Murphy traveled with other U.S. senators to Kiev to meet with the new political leaders in the embattled country of Ukraine. But the conversation for many has turned from Ukraine, to the U.S. relationship with Russia. What's next for the region and has Ukraine completely lost the Crimea peninsula?

Murphy joins us in-studio to debrief on his trip and discuss the possibility of further U.S. actions against Russia.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Wed March 19, 2014

A New Haven Kind of Wheelhouse

Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse heads down to New Haven.
Credit Versageek / Wikimedia Commons

Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse will be in New Haven, where the mayor's race led to special elections that created a political game of musical chairs recently. Our panel of reporters will catch you up on all the week’s news from the Elm City and beyond.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Tue March 18, 2014

Global Warming: Attitudes Toward Our Changing World

This January was the fourth-warmest on record.
Credit NASA Goddard Photo and Video / Creative Commons

A recent Gallup poll found that, when it comes to climate change, Americans just aren't that worried. Less than 36% of those surveyed recognized global warming as an immediate threat, while most placed economic, federal spending, and healthcare issues above the need for environmental action. 

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Mon March 17, 2014

The Ongoing Debate Over Tribal Recognition

One of the big issues surrounding tribal recognition in Connecticut is the construction of more casinos.
Credit David Zeuthen / Creative Commons

Before Thomas Hooker founded the Colony of Connecticut, before Europeans even knew this land existed, the indigenous people already lived off the land. But over hundreds of years, the United States of America grew into what it is today, and the indigenous people were only granted small slices of land if they are "recognized" by the federal government.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri March 14, 2014

Celebrating The Hartford Courant's 250th Year

This year, The Hartford Courant celebrates its 250th year of publication.
Credit NS Newsflash / Creative Commons

For centuries, Connecticut has housed one of American journalism’s greatest gems: The Hartford Courant. In 1764, a New Haven printer by the name of Thomas Green founded the capital-based newspaper. Since then, The Courant has evolved into an established and highly revered news enterprise, circulating well over 100,000 copies to readers each day.

Now, thanks to years of professional writing and reporting, The Courant is celebrating its 250th year of publication, thus maintaining its status as the nation’s oldest continuously-running newspaper. 

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu March 13, 2014

Higher Learning, Higher Crime: A Look at Campus Assault and Violence

Credit Lisa Norwood / Creative Commons

It’s been estimated that roughly one in five female students experiences some form of sexual assault during the course of her college education. It’s a staggering figure that has caught the attention of activists and politicians across the United States.

Earlier this year, the Obama administration announced that it would begin efforts to stop sexual assault on campuses, creating a task force designed to improve the handling and awareness of sexual crimes at colleges and universities.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Wed March 12, 2014

The Wheelhouse Talks FOI, Peter Lanza, and Daylight Saving Time

Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse brings you news from the capitol and across the state.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

It's been a busy week in the news. In 2014 campaign news, the number of Republican candidates for governor went from six to five and then right back up to six. At the state capitol, lawmakers held two public hearings at the same time, both of which ironically had to do with Freedom of Information legislation.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Tue March 11, 2014

School Resource Officers and the Safety of Our Students

School resource officers have long been a fixture in many urban schools.
Credit rob.wall / Creative Commons

After the shootings at Sandy Hook Elementary School, something changed at many schools in Connecticut. Armed guards started appearing in places they hadn’t before: in elementary and middle schools. Districts have struggled with the questions of whether this kind of increased security is worth the cost, and whether it provides the kind of school environment they want.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Mon March 10, 2014

DCF’s Locked Facility for Girls; Sandy Relief Funds; Aid-in-Dying Legislation

Hurricane Sandy devastated parts of the East Coast in late 2012.
Credit DVIDSHUB / Creative Commons

A few weeks ago, we held a conversation about the Connecticut Department of Children and Families’ proposal to open a second locked facility for juvenile justice involved girls. It’s a project that has been at the center of intense debate across the state, as many wonder if it’s the best treatment option for at-risk youths.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri March 7, 2014

Mental Illness, Jayson Blair, and Women Composers

The Women Composers Festival of Hartford celebrates its 14th year at Hartford's Charter Oak Cultural Center.
Credit shadowslicer1 / Creative Commons

Life with bipolar disorder is not easy for anyone. For a prominent psychiatrist, it has provided a very important window into how to treat others. Dr. Kay Redfield Jamison from Johns Hopkins University joins us, author of the bestselling memoir about living with bipolar disorder, An Unquiet Mind. We talk to her in advance of her appearance at Friday night's Connecticut Forum.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu March 6, 2014

What's In A Name?

Credit kaatjevevoort / Flickr Creative Commons

Just last week, a Tennessee judge ruled that the parents of a baby boy they named “Messiah,” must change his name to Martin.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Tue March 4, 2014

Where We Teach: A Conversation With Connecticut's Teachers

WNPR's John Dankosky moderates a discussion with teachers Liz Natale, David Bosso, Ebony Murphy-Root, and David Low.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Our teacher panel welcomed educators from across the state. We broadcasted live from the CPBN Learning Lab, the home of the Journalism and Media Academy Magnet High School Satellite Campus and the Institute for Advanced Media.

Are you a teacher? Why did you decide to enter this profession and what keeps you going back to school every day? Find our tweets from the discussion at #WhereWeTeach, and watch our video of the event below.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Mon March 3, 2014

How is Connecticut's Fiscal Health?

Donald Boyd, Keith Phaneuf, Spencer Cain, and Benjamin Barnes at the MetroHartford Alliance panel discussion, "Fiscal Sustainability: Critical to Connecticut's Growth."
Credit MetroHartford Alliance

Connecticut’s state budget faces a series of problems that have been building for some time. It’s why the Office of Fiscal Analysis shows looming budget deficits in the next two fiscal years.

But we’re not alone. A study of several states shows some of the same trends: Medicaid costs growing faster than states can raise money, which means less funding for education; the federal government cutting aid to states in an effort to cut their own deficits; reliance on volatile tax structures and massive underfunding of public pensions.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu February 27, 2014

Diplomacy 101

Should American politicians have the power to appoint diplomats?
Credit 123ArtistImages/iStock / Thinkstock

Whenever we hear that a new U.S. ambassador has been nominated, it’s not unreasonable for us to assume that the nominee has been to his or her appointed country. But, as we learned from President Obama’s most recent ambassadorial appointments -- in America, at least -- that's not always the case. 

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Wed February 26, 2014

The Wheelhouse Goes From D.C. to Hartford: Politics, Investigations, and Feuds

Louisiana Gov. Bobby Jindal and Connecticut Gov. Dannel Malloy outside the White House on Monday.
Credit C-SPAN

For months, reporters have been asking Governor Dannel Malloy if he is running for re-election this year. On Sunday, he shared his future plans: He is not running for president in 2016.

Oh.

On our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse, we'll talk about Malloy's trip to Washington, D.C. for the National Governors Association meetings where he got into a well-publicized spat with Louisiana Governor Bobby Jindal.

Closer to home, another investigation is taking place at the state capitol involving the use of a printer in Florida for campaign materials.

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Pro-Life, Anti-Planned Parenthood
1:59 pm
Tue February 25, 2014

Alveda King: Abortion Is a Civil Rights Issue

Dr. Alveda King

Dr. Alveda King has taken up the civil rights mantle of her uncle, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. But her driving issue is abortion, and she has a vehemently pro-life stance. She says her uncle would agree with her. 

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Tue February 25, 2014

A Conversation About Minimum Wage, Education, and Civil Rights

United States Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez speaking at the AFL-CIO Convention in 2013.
Credit US Department of Labor / Creative Commons

On Monday, United States Secretary of Labor Thomas Perez came to Connecticut to discuss minimum wage increases with local business leaders, workers, and politicians. During his trip, he called us to talk about how states like Connecticut are handling a higher minimum wage. What effect could this have on employment in the United States? 

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Mon February 24, 2014

Will Connecticut See a Second Maximum Security Facility for Girls?

Where We Live guest Martha Stone.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Each year, 1.4 million of the nation’s eleven- to 17-year-olds enter the juvenile justice system. Of these boys and girls, some 71,000 are sent to incarceration facilities, where they may remain for several months in seclusion from the outside world. 

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri February 21, 2014

New Releases From Goodnight Blue Moon and Daphne Lee Martin

Goodnight Blue Moon performed songs from their new EP, <em>A Girl I Never Met</em>
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

This hour, we check back in with two musical acts that we’ve featured on the program before. Goodnight Blue Moon’s Elm City roots are evident in their music. Their new EP, A Girl I Never Met, features a song that’s based on a poem found in a Fair Haven history book. Goodnight Blue Moon join us in studio to talk about the new release and to play some music.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu February 20, 2014

Gender Balance and the Culture of Women in Science

What is causing a shortage of female scientists?
Credit Defence Images / Creative Commons

In 1962, the Nobel Prize was awarded to three scientists, James Watson, Francis Crick, and Maurice Wilkins, for their work in discovering the fundamental structure of DNA: the double helix. Today, Watson, Crick, and Wilkins maintain international prestige for their findings. 

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Wed February 19, 2014

The Wheelhouse Remembers a Felonious Governor

The Wheelhouse is broadcasting from Trumbull Street.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Once again, Connecticut’s felonious former governor is making headlines. This time, John Rowland is hiring a criminal defense attorney as officials investigate his role in the 2012 congressional campaign of Lisa Wilson-Foley.

Our weekly news roundtable The Wheelhouse discusses this and all the week’s news from our downtown Hartford location.

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Transportation
4:27 pm
Tue February 18, 2014

Why Hartford's I-84 Viaduct Is a Futureless Freeway

I-84 Viaduct
Credit I-84 Hartford Project

Hartford's Aetna Viaduct is among the top ten urban highways that deserve to be torn down, according to a new study by Congress for the New Urbanism. The yearly report, "Freeways without Futures" lists the elevated stretch of I-84 (in no particular order of futureless-ness) with such highways as I-10 in New Orleans, I-81 in Syracuse, and I-70 in St. Louis.

The criteria for being a futureless freeway?

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Tue February 18, 2014

Pre-K and Right-to-Die Bills Face the Legislature in 2014

Myra Jones-Taylor, executive director of Connecticut's Office of Early Childhood.
Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy's agenda includes universal access to pre-kindergarten. But in New York City, Mayor Bill de Blasio is proposing universal pre-kindergarten.

What's the difference?

This hour, we ask the executive director of the Office of Early Childhood, who is working on this issue.

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Fri February 14, 2014

The Art of the Oyster

Humans have been consuming oysters for thousands of years.
Credit EEPaul / Creative Commons

Oysters have been part of the human diet for thousands of years. It’s no wonder then that many of us know them as a favored menu item. But these beloved bivalves have a history that extends far beyond the dinner plate. 

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Where We Live
9:00 am
Thu February 13, 2014

War on Poverty is Far From Won

President Lyndon B. Johnson signs the Economic Opportunity Act of 1964.
Credit LBJ Library

Just over 50 years ago, President Lyndon B. Johnson delivered his State of the Union address and made a pledge to the nation. "This administration today, here and now, declares unconditional war on poverty in America," he said.

Johnson didn't live long enough to see the end of the War on Poverty...and neither have we. Poverty continues to be a big problem in the United States and right here in Connecticut.

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