WNPR

Catie Talarski

Executive Producer

Catie Talarski is Executive Producer at WNPR, focusing on original WNPR programs; working to develop new concepts, live events and content strategies, with concentration on three pillars: Talk Programming, Community Outreach, and Education.

Catie got her start in documentary radio at the Salt Institute in Portland Maine. She has produced several PRNDI award-winning programs on Where We Live, including coverage of young people leaving Connecticut and Sexual Assault on College Campuses. In honoring her award-winning 2010 episode about what makes a good neighbor, PRNDI judges wrote that Where We Live “takes a news story and spins it into universal connections for listeners. This program is an inspiring example of how talk programs can take the ordinary and make it extraordinary.”

Catie’s also documented end-of-life decisions made by young people with Cystic Fibrosis for NPR’s Hearing Voices, and dug into archival tape of artist Romare Bearden for Studio 360. For WNPR, she’s explored the underbelly of Hartford’s Park River, and the history of the women who helped save the Mark Twain House. She worked with the Public Radio Exchange to produce the hour-long specials BULLIED: Teen Stories from Generation PRX and Left Behind, Dropping Out.

Her foray into magazine writing includes an article about her Polish heritage published in SilverKris, the in-flight magazine of Singapore Airlines.

Catie was inspired by Third Coast and others to create live events to build community around radio. She launched *the ear cave* a listening session hosted by a rotating cast of local radio professionals held at a coffeehouse in Hartford. And her Radio Adventure Theater is an experimental variety show that combines live music, theater, poetry and documentary radio. You can follow Catie on Twitter.

Ways to Connect

Victor Björkund/ Creative Commons

It's been 20 years since Connecticut's landmark Sheff v. O'Neill ruling, which said that segregation in Hartford schools was unconstitutional. This hour, we dive into an investigation by The Hartford Courant about how some neighborhood schools are still struggling, and how Sheff didn't solve the challenge of school integration. 

Middlebury College

A recent Gallup poll of college students found that a majority of students think that colleges shouldn’t restrict speech on campus just because some political views are controversial or unpopular. But lately, disruptive protests of controversial speakers have again brought the issue of free speech front and center. 

Fighting For The Vote

Mar 8, 2017
FBI/wikimedia

Fifty-two years ago this week, 600 peaceful protesters gathered in Selma, Alabama for what would become known as The Bloody Sunday March. Their goal was to draw attention to the importance of protecting the vote, not just for African Americans, but all Americans. 

Wikimedia

When we think of feminism, most people think of liberals and the Democratic party. But the Republicans were actually the first party to endorse the Equal Rights Amendment. And at that time, the GOP was more supportive of women’s right to vote than the Democratic party. 

David Maiolo / Creative Commons

This hour, we dissect President Trump's joint address to Congress -- what he's themed "the renewal of the American spirit."

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Welcome to the Wheelhouse -- WNPR’s Weekly News Roundtable -- as we celebrate our first week as “The Enemy of the American People!” 

It’s true that trust and confidence in the media has faltered over the years, as has confidence in every branch of government. But the “failing” New York Times, as President Trump calls the paper, has actually seen a gigantic surge in its readership.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

It's been an interesting week for Connecticut U.S. Senators. President Donald Trump said Richard Blumenthal misrepresented a conversation with Supreme Court nominee Neil Gorsuch. In a tweet, Trump called out the Senator for an incident in 2010: "Sen. Richard Blumenthal, who never fought in Vietnam when he said for years he had (major lie)."

Adam Gault/Photodisc / Thinkstock

It's budget day! It's the day Governor Dannel Malloy unveils his budget proposal to the state. And what can we expect? Well, cities and towns may be on the hook for more money going towards teachers' pensions; the elimination of a $200 property tax credit; changes to the Education Cost Sharing formula; a transportation lockbox? 

Beverly & Pack, Creative Commons / Flickr Creative Commons

It's cold, snowy winter times like this that make us question why we choose to live in a place where snow, sleet, and wind define one-third of the year.  It's a great excuse to complain, but does it also make us stronger and better people?

Harriet Jones / WNPR

The theme of the past week may well be "protest." Thousands came out to local airports across the country to protest Donald Trump's immigration executive order. Democrats, including Connecticut's own senator Chris Murphy, are speaking out against Trump's executive orders and cabinet nominations.

C-SPAN

We're halfway through week one of Donald Trump's presidency. So far, we've experienced Sean Spicer's "abnormal" press conference, an executive order to withdraw from the Trans-Pacific Partnership, separate meetings with the President of Egypt and union leaders, another executive order to advance the approval of oil pipelines, and not one tax return

Jamelle Boule / Creative Commons

The inauguration is days away. Whether you're excited or not, the transfer of power from Barack Obama to Donald Trump is an historic event.  And an expensive event, at a price tag of more than $200 million. The Department of Homeland Security says they expect 900,000, including many protestors. While past Presidents like Bill Clinton, Jimmy Carter, and George W. Bush will be in attendance, more than fifty House Democrats say they will not attend

Pete Souza / White House

Last night night, President Obama delivered his farewell address to the nation. The speech was - let’s say, juxtaposed - with news that intelligence officials have briefed both Obama and President-Elect Donald Trump about reports that Russia had gathered “salacious” and compromising material about Trump. Although, it’s unclear what exactly counts as salacious anymore. 

Mike Grauer Jr. / Flickr Creative Commons

  Vin Baker was an Olympic basketball player and four-time NBA All Star. The journey from University of Hartford to professional basketball got him rich quick, but it was a lifestyle he couldn't keep up with.

Baker's struggle with alcoholism is well-documented, as is the fact he blew through $100 million. He lost his home and restaurant.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Wednesday is the start of Connecticut’s legislative session. Lawmakers reconvene, starting squarely at a massive state budget deficit, and a crisis in pension costs that Comptroller Kevin Lembo said will “crush us” unless something is done. 

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