WNPR

Cassandra Basler

Cassandra Basler comes to WSHU by way of Columbia Journalism School in New York City. She recently graduated with a Pulitzer Traveling Fellowship, which means she has two years to report on an issue anywhere in the world (she's still figuring out where she'd like to go). She grew up just north of Detroit, Michigan, where she worked for the local public radio affiliate. She also wrote about her adventures sampling the city cuisines for the first guidebook to be published in three decades, Belle Isle to 8 Mile: An Insider's Guide to Detroit. Before that, Cassandra studied English, German and Urban Studies at University of Michigan. When she's not reporting on wealth and poverty, she's writing about food and family.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Communities along Connecticut’s southeastern shore want faster, reliable train service to Washington, D.C, New York, and Boston -- but not if it skips their local train stations. A proposed federal plan for high speed rail would do just that.

Family and friends of former New England Patriots player Aaron Hernandez gathered for a private funeral in his hometown of Bristol, Connecticut, on Monday.

Controversial feminist activist Ayaan Hirsi Ali gave a lecture that drew about 500 people to Fairfield University on International Women’s Day this week.

Jesse Costa / WBUR

Volunteer lawyers in Boston are standing by Monday in anticipation of the impact of President Donald Trump's revised executive order halting travel for immigrants from six Muslim-majority nations. The president's existing order was put on hold by federal courts. The new order was signed on Monday, and goes into effect on March 16.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Many small towns in New England are eager to welcome refugees from the war in Syria, but that doesn’t seem likely under President Donald Trump’s shifting immigration policy.

St. Johnsbury Academy in Vermont has found a way around that -- they’re offering scholarships to refugees already living in the U.S.

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