WNPR

Carmen Baskauf

Producer, Where We Live

Credit Chion Wolf / WNPR

Carmen Baskauf is a producer for WNPR news-talk show Where We Live, hosted by Lucy Nalpathanchil. She has also contributed to The Colin McEnroe Show.

Carmen produces shows on a wide variety of topics for Where We Live; her favorites tend to be related to science and/or gender. Highlights include producing a full hour about menstruation, and meeting a real-live glowing axolotl in studio for a show on bioluminescence and biofluorescence.

Originally from Nashville, Tennessee, Carmen now lives in New Haven, Connecticut. She has a B.A. in History from Yale University, where she studied nationalist movements in 20th-century North Africa and the Middle East, as well as international migration and human trafficking.

In her free time, Carmen likes reading about anything having to do with evolutionary biology, dinosaurs, public health, or a combination of the three.

Ways to Connect

Michael Blann/Digital Vision / Thinkstock

Who should be able to build casinos in Connecticut?

Plans by the Mashantucket Pequot and Mohegan tribes to build a third gaming facility in East Windsor have stalled, and lawmakers in southwestern Connecticut are now pushing a bill to scrap that plan in favor of a new casino in Bridgeport.

Aequorea victoria
Sierra Blakely / Wikimedia Commons

Did you know 75 percent of animals in the ocean glow?

Andy Fleischmann - State Representative for West Hartford and Co-Chair of the CT General Assembly Education Committee.
Chion Wolf / WNPR

The state Supreme Court ruled last month that the way Connecticut funds public schools doesn’t violate the state’s constitution.

Lydia Brown / WNPR

It’s the deadliest drug crisis in our nation’s history and communities in Connecticut are coming together to talk about solutions.

This hour, we listen back to a recent opioid panel recorded at Gateway Community College in New Haven.

What’s the best way to support individuals and families battling substance abuse -- especially when one size does not fit all?

Gage Skidmore / Wikimedia Commons

Tonight, President Trump will deliver his first State of the Union address to Congress—and to America.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Xhenet Aliu is a native of Waterbury, CT, a city that once hosted a strong brass manufacturing industry.

Thor_Deichmann / Pixabay

Home DNA kits like 23andMe or Ancestry are a fun way to learn about your family and your own body. But what happens when exploring your genome uncovers disturbing information about your health?

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

What happens when a river fills with ice?

Till Westermayer / Flickr

For someone with food allergies, a taste of peanut butter or a bite of shellfish could be life-threatening.

Erowid Center

It’s been declared a national public health emergency. In the United States, the annual number of deaths from opioid overdose has surpassed the number of deaths during the height of the AIDS epidemic in the ‘90s.

But opioid users aren’t the only victims of this crisis. 

Syrian American Medical Society

Syria is in its sixth year of civil war, and hundreds of thousands of Syrians have been killed in the conflict.

This hour, we talk about the medical crisis in Syria. Doctors are among those who’ve been targeted by the Syrian government. Many have left the country.

Arthur Caranta / Flickr

They may not look like R2D2 or BB8, but in 2018, robots are an important part of our world.

This hour we talk about ​automation—new advances in “smart” technology during a period of time that’s been dubbed the “Fourth Industrial Revolution.”

Sheldahl / Wikimedia Commons

It's an important monthly cycle for half the world's population, yet even in 2017 many people aren’t comfortable talking about it.

This hour, why is menstruation so taboo, even though it’s a basic part of human biology?

Aequorea victoria
Sierra Blakely / Wikimedia Commons

Did you know 75 percent of animals in the ocean glow?

DVIDSHUB / Flickr

In recent weeks, one industry after another in the U.S. has begun to confront sexual harassment and assault.

But the military has known for years that it has a problem—by the U.S. Department of Defense’s own estimate, nearly 15,000 service members were sexually assaulted in 2016.

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