WNPR

Alden Bourne

Before joining New England Public Radio, Alden was a producer for the CBS NEWS program 60 Minutes. In that role, he covered  topics ranging from art, music and medicine to business, education, and politics. Working with correspondent Morley Safer, he reported from locations across the United States as well as from India, Costa Rica, Italy, and Iraq.  

Alden attended Boston College and received a B.S. in Economics. He later took a year away from CBS to participate in the Knight-Wallace Journalism Fellowship at the University of Michigan.

Alden was part of the 60 Minutes team that won a duPont-Columbia University Award for “60 Minutes: Punishing Saddam,” a report on the impact of U.N. sanctions on the children of Iraq. He was also honored for excellence in coverage of race and ethnicity by the Columbia University School of Journalism  for “Vice Versa,” a story on a white-only scholarship program at an historically black college in Alabama. Alden has been on staff at NEPR since May 2016.  

The proposal, under review by the Hartford City Council, comes after complaints about the Hartford Women's Center, which opened earlier this year.

Last week, state lawmakers decided to allow some people with criminal records to work in casinos. The head of MGM Springfield said the company is "very excited" by the change. 

A western Massachusetts business owner faces a boycott of his stores after attending an event with President Trump last week. But he says he's being unfairly targeted.

Since it opened in June, the new Amazing World of Dr. Seuss Museum has attracted thousands of visitors to Springfield. It features murals and statues of some of the author's most famous characters, like Horton the Elephant and the Cat in the Hat.

A proposed memorial honoring World War II veterans is causing controversy. The dispute focuses on just who should be honored.

The memorial is designed to be an exact copy of one that was removed in 1959 to make way for a new highway. It honored black veterans who served in World War II, but only covers those who enlisted or were drafted through 1943.

It's been a little over two months since the Worcester police introduced officers on horseback. There are four horses and seven officers in the new mounted unit.

They've been patrolling parks, the Worcester Common and across the city. Police Chief Steven Sargent said they're also sent out to a neighborhood after a report of a shooting.

The state of Massachusetts planned to require more internet retailers to collect sales tax starting July 1st. But the initiative has been pulled just days before it would take effect.

Under the Baker administration plan, internet retailers with sales of $500,000 and 100 transaction per year in Massachusetts would have to charge the tax.

But the state rescinded the plan after two lawsuits were filed. The Department of Revenue said it will reintroduce the tax through a new regulation this fall.

The credit rating for Massachusetts is now on par with most New England states. That's after a major credit rating agency downgraded the state's bonds.

At a recent FCC auction, the broadcast frequency for WGBY in Springfield sold for $57 million.

The station will move to a different channel. The license for the current frequency is owned by WGBH in Boston, and the money will go into its endowment, with annual disbursements to WGBY.

"We will probably increase local content, education services -- things that we've been doing for a long time, but things that we haven't been able to enhance and grow because of financial reasons," said Lynn Page, the station's acting general manager.