Beijing Correspondent Louisa Lim is currently attending the University of Michigan as a Knight-Wallace Fellow. She will return to her regular role in 2014.

Based in Beijing, NPR foreign correspondent Louisa Lim finds China a hugely diverse, vibrant, fascinating place. "Everywhere you look and everyone you talk to has a fascinating story," she notes, adding that she's "spoiled with choices" of stories to cover. In her reports, Lim takes "NPR listeners to places they never knew existed. I want to give them an idea of how China is changing and what that might mean for them."

Juvenile Justice
6:01 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Transgender Teen Outlines Years of Abuse While in DCF Custody

Credit Brian Turner / Creative Commons

A temporary restraining order has been filed in federal court on behalf of a transgender juvenile being detained at Connecticut's women's prison. It includes an affidavit from the 16-year-old alleging multiple accounts of physical and sexual abuse while she was in DCF custody.

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Connecticut First
5:38 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Bill Protecting Public's Right to Record Police Officers; Metro North Survey

Lawmakers are considering a proposal that would further protect the public’s right to record police officers. The bill has been pushed through the Judiciary Committee, which approved it two weeks ago. They’re awaiting waiting again for the Senate and House to act. Current law already allows people to record police from a safe distance, but the bill would take it a step further by allowing people to sue officers who interfere with the recording of their actions.

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Racial Profiling
5:26 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Retired MLB Player Racially Profiled in His Hartford Driveway

Doug Glanville played Major League Baseball for 11 seasons, most with the Philadelphia Phillies.
Credit Garrett Craig / Creative Commons

Doug Glanville is a lot more than a former Major League Baseball player. He graduated from an Ivy League school with a degree in engineering. He contributes to the New York Times and is a regular ESPN commentator.

In a recent piece for The Atlantic, Glanville wrote about how none of those accomplishments mattered when he was racially profiled by a West Hartford police officer in his own driveway...in Hartford. 

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Cybersecurity
4:36 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

Connecticut and Utilities Prepare Defenses Against Cyberattacks

Credit Flickr user Chris Hunkeler/ Creative Commons

Governor Dannel Malloy has released a plan to protect Connecticut's utilities against cyber attacks. Connecticut's electric, natural gas, major water companies and the regional distribution systems have already been penetrated in the past.

When asked just how many cyber attacks have happened, Arthur House, chairman of the Public Utilities Regulatory Authority, said he can't go into much detail.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
2:52 pm
Mon April 14, 2014

The Boston Marathon Bombing and the Road to Resilience

Credit miz_ginevra / Flickr Creative Commons

Consider America from 1985 to 2000. You wouldn't say nothing happened in those 15 years but America was a fairly calm place to be most of the time.

Now consider the period that came next. It began with a presidential election so riddled with such uncertainties that the effort to confirm the result dragged on for days and went to the Supreme Court.

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The Faith Middleton Show
11:23 am
Mon April 14, 2014

The Science of Skinny

Credit D. Sharon Pruitt/flickr creative commons

Today's show has aired on twelve previous dates, most recently on February 10 and 15, 2014.  

With scientific research, her own chemistry background, and the traditional diets of our not-so-distant ancestors as her guide, Dee McCaffrey casts new light on an age-old wisdom: Eating foods in their closest-to-natural form is the true path to sustained weight loss and, in fact, the remedy for almost any health problem. We are so far removed from foods in their natural state that we now call them “health foods,” a sad admission that we’ve compromised our health for the sake of convenience.

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The Colin McEnroe Show
10:32 am
Mon April 14, 2014

The Scramble: Mad Men, Blood Moons, and Racism

Rand Richards Cooper is an author, essayist, and freelance writer.
Chion Wolf WNPR

Our SuperGuest on today's Scramble is Jen Doll, who has three topics that she wants to discuss:

The first is the return of Mad Men, a show in its final season and perhaps more than any other TV show, a driver of the phenomenon that utilizes the talents of many, many cultural commentators to analyze and debate the underlying themes in each episode. If you visited a site like Slate or Salon on certain Monday mornings, you might make the mistake of thinking this was a publication mainly, or entirely about, Mad Men.

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Autism Spectrum Disorders
10:02 am
Mon April 14, 2014

Early Childhood Autism Treatment Is Key, But Diagnosis Is Difficult

A young boy with autism with a line of toys he sorted before falling asleep.
Credit Andwhatsnext / Creative Commons

Most children with autism are well past their fourth birthday by the time they’re diagnosed with the condition, according to new government data.

Their parents and teachers may have raised red flags earlier, but it takes months or years to confirm suspicions with a formal diagnosis. And therapy rarely starts without one.

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Where We Live
8:52 am
Mon April 14, 2014

The Success and Failure of Design; a Conversation with Medea Benjamin

According to design writer Alice Rawsthorn, design is one of the most powerful forces in our lives.
Credit bradhoc / Creative Commons

This hour, we take a look at design and the impact it has on our lives. Longtime design critic and author Alice Rawsthorn joins us along with Dr. Henry Petroski of Duke University to talk about the good design that helps us, and bad design that hinders us in our daily routines.

Later, we talk to CodePink co-founder Medea Benjamin about her work as a political activist and author. Her latest book is called Drone Warfare: Killing by Remote Control.

GUESTS:

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