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The state's budget crisis is hitting Connecticut schools hard, and special education programs might also be feeling the pain, even though these services are protected by federal law.

Chion Wolf / WNPR

The Hartford Symphony Orchestra's music director Carolyn Kuan became a U.S. citizen on Saturday.

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

Marie Degro was the first student to arrive at Crosby High School in Waterbury from Puerto Rico in the aftermath of Hurricane Maria.

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Veronica Montalvo was born in Willimantic and has lived in Hartford, Middletown, Waterbury -- and, now, San Juan. She moved there earlier this year. And she weathered Hurricane Maria in her 300-year-old apartment building. She says the hours of howling winds were unbearable. The walls of her apartment were so wet they looked like they were crying. Part of her ceiling caved in.

And now, the aftermath.

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Connecticut’s secretary of the state says she’s wary of too much federal control of election systems. Denise Merrill says the states are currently in talks with the Department of Homeland Security over how much regulation should be imposed. 

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Some state universities and community colleges could soon welcome students displaced by Hurricane Maria. Now the system’s president has proposed offering  those students in-state tuition rates.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Residents gathered at a rally in downtown Hartford Wednesday to call attention to the ongoing humanitarian crisis in Puerto Rico. 

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With the cool weather and short days of October, thoughts often go towards pumpkins and winter squash.

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Health insurance for thousands of children in Connecticut could soon disappear.

That’s because Congress failed to meet a September 30th deadline to renew funding for the Children’s Health Insurance Program, or CHIP.

Ryan Caron King / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy says he expects changes to Connecticut's gun laws in reaction to the killings Sunday night in Las Vegas. 

Frankie Graziano / WNPR

The leveling of Puerto Rico by Hurricane Maria is personal to the employees of Durham School Services. More than half of them are Puerto Rican. The normal driving schedule at the school bus company in Waterbury is 6am to 9am and then again from 1pm to 5pm. But it’s what they do in-between and after work that is less about the routine and more about helping out back at home.

Ruben Zapata was surrounded by school buses and pallets full of bottled water, diapers, and other supplies. They unloaded a bunch already, but they still have 11 buses to go.  For them, it’s hard to keep up.

Patrick Skahill / WNPR

Medical students are turning from the two-dimensional pages of their textbooks to the three-dimensional world of hand-held models. That’s because 3-D printing is changing the way doctors learn complex procedures, a development which could make medicine more personalized.

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The state’s largest health insurer, Anthem is still in dispute with Hartford HealthCare over reimbursement for health services, but another insurer has reached a contract with the hospital system. 

Chion Wolf / WNPR

Governor Dannel Malloy's veto of the Republican budget remains unchallenged. 

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The mass shooting in Las Vegas is dominating the media news cycle. Since the tragedy Sunday night, TV news and social media have displayed a continuous stream of images and video of the chaotic scene at the Highway 91 Harvest Festival that left at least 59 dead.

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